Now reading - Page 176 - Politics Forum.org | PoFo

Wandering the information superhighway, he came upon the last refuge of civilization, PoFo, the only forum on the internet ...

Discuss literary and artistic creations, or post your own poetry, essays etc.
Forum rules: No one line posts please.
User avatar
By Potemkin
#14984985
Wellsy wrote:Heard it said that it was Russia that first kicked off with “big novels”.

Nah, that was Fielding, Sterne, Balzac, Stendhal et al. The Russians excelled first as poets before they excelled as novelists. The West tends only to be familiar with Russian novelists, whereas Russians themselves revere their poets far more than their novelists. After all, Tolstoy, Dostoyevsky and Turgenev got most of their ideas from Pushkin, Lermontov and Nekrasov. Lol.

Curious to art and culture in Rusdia now that also seen it said how poetry was popular across all parts of society. Something amazing if true when compared to my experience of modern australia and usa

That is true, and there are specific historical reasons for it. In the West, human values could reside in our institutions, which (from the 17th century onwards) were increasingly liberal and humane. Russia, on the other hand, had no tradition of liberalism and no institutions in which human values could be hallowed or safeguarded. Tsarism was a brutal autocracy, under which not even the Russian aristocracy had any power or any freedom of opinion. Even religion could not safeguard human values, since Peter the Great had reduced the Orthodox Church to a subservient branch of the state apparatus. Where else could human values live in Russia, then, if not in the only refuge left to them - in poetry? The poets became the conscience of Russia under Tsarism and, later, under the Soviet system too. Pushkin and Lermontov were killed by the Tsarist system, and died as martyrs to uphold human values in the face of an inhuman political system. Mandelstam self-consciously followed the same path under the Soviet system. Russian poets have historically regarded themselves as prophets and martyrs, who must be willing to die to bear witness to the truth. This explains the high regard in which poets have traditionally been held in Russian society, in contrast to the West, in which writing poetry is regarded as a fucking joke. As Mandelstam's widow Nadezhda put it, "Here, they kill people for it." That's how seriously Russians take poetry - they are willing to kill and to die for it.
User avatar
By Wellsy
#14985079
Heisenberg wrote:I mostly can't understand why Jezal doesn't get slapped more.

Yeah he is a pretty pathetic whinge and only becomes slightly more endearing the further along he goes for less whinging but still not entirely likable as a character.

Inquisitor glokta Whinges a lot but part of that is he is in constant pain and not just a pathetic response to circumstance.

Potemkin wrote:Nah, that was Fielding, Sterne, Balzac, Stendhal et al. The Russians excelled first as poets before they excelled as novelists. The West tends only to be familiar with Russian novelists, whereas Russians themselves revere their poets far more than their novelists. After all, Tolstoy, Dostoyevsky and Turgenev got most of their ideas from Pushkin, Lermontov and Nekrasov. Lol.

I stand corrected

That is true, and there are specific historical reasons for it. In the West, human values could reside in our institutions, which (from the 17th century onwards) were increasingly liberal and humane. Russia, on the other hand, had no tradition of liberalism and no institutions in which human values could be hallowed or safeguarded. Tsarism was a brutal autocracy, under which not even the Russian aristocracy had any power or any freedom of opinion. Even religion could not safeguard human values, since Peter the Great had reduced the Orthodox Church to a subservient branch of the state apparatus. Where else could human values live in Russia, then, if not in the only refuge left to them - in poetry? The poets became the conscience of Russia under Tsarism and, later, under the Soviet system too. Pushkin and Lermontov were killed by the Tsarist system, and died as martyrs to uphold human values in the face of an inhuman political system. Mandelstam self-consciously followed the same path under the Soviet system. Russian poets have historically regarded themselves as prophets and martyrs, who must be willing to die to bear witness to the truth. This explains the high regard in which poets have traditionally been held in Russian society, in contrast to the West, in which writing poetry is regarded as a fucking joke. As Mandelstam's widow Nadezhda put it, "Here, they kill people for it." That's how seriously Russians take poetry - they are willing to kill and to die for it.

Shiiiiit, some serious art from some hard repression.
User avatar
By Potemkin
#14985082
Wellsy wrote:Shiiiiit, some serious art from some hard repression.

Yup, and of course when the repression (largely) stopped, so did the serious art. Being a poet in Russia no longer means what it once did. Some poets have never managed to adjust to their lowly status in the New Russia. They have been robbed of their halo of martyrdom, and they now cut rather pathetic figures. :lol:
User avatar
By khawarezm
#14986660
I am currently reading Steve Jobs biography. Usually I prefer autobiographies over biographies, so this is an exceptional case in the modern era of my life.

I liked how chapter 13 introduced the concept of divergence which is relevant to GUIs and icons in the context of computers, and to light in the context of America.
  • 1
  • 172
  • 173
  • 174
  • 175
  • 176
Pro and Anti EU - The Arguments

I think Steve_American point is about like the EU[…]

Why I am a Materialist Christian

@Victoribus Spolia , Just wanted to note, make[…]

https://youtu.be/typ2pl2L47k His best movie so far[…]

Making water potable is simple, even a Muslim cou[…]