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By late
#15145964
I just started Rise and Fall of American Growth, and it's terrific.

It's also huge, over 700 pages. If you read in bed, holding the book up, the damn thing could give you a concussion if you fall asleep while reading.

The copy I have is a library book, if I want to finish it, and I do, I am going to have to buy a copy. I'll start a thread to review it at some point. I don't buy a lot of books on economics, last one was Price of Inequality several years ago. IOW, this is something special, even if you don't agree with the thesis. Which, at the moment, I do not.

If you want a better understanding of how the world works, you won't find better without going to college for it.
By ness31
#15145969
No. She is not a lousy writer.
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By Potemkin
#15145971
ness31 wrote:No. She is not a lousy writer.

Image
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By QatzelOk
#15145976
Potemkin wrote:Image

The cartoon format is perfect for Rand.

A two-dimensional worldview that is essentialized to hell in order to fit into small, pre-defined square panels. :lol:
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By QatzelOk
#15145977
late wrote:I just started Rise and Fall of American Growth, and it's terrific.


I'm not sure how far along you are in the book, but here is a brief summary:

Princeton wrote:The Rise and Fall of American Growth challenges the view that economic growth will continue unabated, and demonstrates that the life-altering scale of innovations between 1870 and 1970 cannot be repeated.


Does the author make any reference to all the genocides between 1755 and 1870 that made "American growth" possible and inevitable?

Does Gordon celebrate these genocides, ignore them, or criticize them in any way?
By late
#15145991
QatzelOk wrote:
Does the author make any reference to all the genocides between 1755 and 1870 that made "American growth" possible and inevitable?

Does Gordon celebrate these genocides, ignore them, or criticize them in any way?



Sigh, he starts in 1870.
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By QatzelOk
#15145992
late wrote:Sigh, he starts in 1870.

So the story "was born yesterday?" :lol:
By late
#15145994
QatzelOk wrote:
So the story "was born yesterday?" :lol:



As long you define 150 years ago as born yesterday...
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By Potemkin
#15145998
QatzelOk wrote:So the story "was born yesterday?" :lol:

All Americans were "born yesterday", @QatzelOk. As Henry Ford famously (and loudly) asserted, "History is bunk!" :)
By ness31
#15146027
I didn’t understand the cartoon ☹️

Who’s Bob the Angry flower? Is he a Triffid or something?

And why is Rand two dimensional? I suspect she’s using that style as a literary tool to make her points.
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By QatzelOk
#15146031
late wrote:Sigh, he starts in 1870.

So that means that Gordon has written a "how to be a rich country" book that, before buying it, the reader must genocide a hundred nations if he expects the "formula" inside the book to work.

Maybe the bookstore can add a sticker to the plastic on the dust jacket that says: "Genocide BEFORE buying."
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By Potemkin
#15146034
ness31 wrote:I didn’t understand the cartoon ☹️

Who’s Bob the Angry flower? Is he a Triffid or something?

Bob is a flower. As to whether or not he's a Triffid, I really can't say. But he's very angry, about pretty much everything. :)
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By Lightman
#15148705
Anyone ever read Octavia Butler's Lilith's Brood trilogy? I'm about halfway through the third book of the trilogy.
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By Godstud
#15148708
@Lightman Nope. What's it about?

I am "reading" a sci-fi novel, Speaker For The Dead(follow-up book to Ender's Game), by Orson Scott Card. I just finished Ender's Game. The movie was more like a short story version. So much was excluded.

Ender's Game was excellent and Speaker For The Dead is turning out to be just as good.

I have the audiobook version of both, but the author even says that this was the best medium for his books, as he was, originally, a play-wright.

At the same time I am reading Sharpe's Trafalgar by Bernard Cornwell. :D
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By Lightman
#15148712
Spoilers, obviously: basically, after a nuclear war, an alien species rescues the remnants of humanity. The species' thing is genetically intermixing with other species. Broadly, the series is about humanity's reaction to this forced breeding program.
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By Godstud
#15148714
Aha, another sci-fi series that I can find. Cool.

I like sci-fi series that deal with social issues or even human ones. You have a much greater connection with the book if there's an emotional and intellectual impact.
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By Drlee
#15148729
Welcome back @Lightman !!!!
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By AFAIK
#15152096
In The Dragon's Shadow by Sebastian Strangio

A good summary of the relationship between China and SE Asia and I'd recommend following the author if you're interested in this region of the world.
http://www.sebastianstrangio.com/
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By Godstud
#15152099
I just finished Speaker for the Dead (audiobook),by Orson Scott Card and Sharpe's Prey, by Bernard Cornwell. Great books.

I've started War Lord, by Bernard Cornwell. :D
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By Heisenberg
#15152128
Working my way through Stalin's Englishman, a biography of Guy Burgess. It was a Christmas present from my girlfriend, who explained that "the title sounded like you" as I opened it. :lol:
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