Genocide in Myanmar and no one cares. - Page 3 - Politics Forum.org | PoFo

Wandering the information superhighway, he came upon the last refuge of civilization, PoFo, the only forum on the internet ...

Talk about what you've seen in the news today.

Moderator: PoFo Today's News Mods

#14752864
@anarchist23
If you have read the OP it says that there is systematic oppression of the Royhinga and that there is little publicity at the moment.
Sorry I did not read it. I just could not bring myself to care.
#14752878
Myanmar has hundreds of ethnic groups with a history of co-existence, I wonder what got this one group singled out? Death is always a serious thing but I don't see these numbers as supporting evidence of a genocide.
#14752886
Myanmar: A New Muslim Insurgency in Rakhine State

Recent attacks by an émigré-led force of trained Rohingya fighters mark a dangerous turn. To remove a main root of the violence – Rohingya despair – the government must reverse longstanding discrimination against the Muslim minority, moderate its military tactics, and reach out to Myanmar’s Muslim allies.

Executive Summary

The deadly attacks on Border Guard Police (BGP) bases in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State on 9 October 2016 and the days following, and a serious escalation on 12 November when a senior army officer was killed, signify the emergence of a new Muslim insurgency there. The current violence is qualitatively different from anything in recent decades, seriously threatens the prospects of stability and development in the state and has serious implications for Myanmar as a whole. The government faces a huge challenge in calibrating and integrating its political, policy and security responses to ensure that violence does not escalate and intercommunal tensions are kept under control. It requires also taking due account of the grievances and fears of Rakhine Buddhists.

Failure to get this right would carry enormous risks. While the government has a clear duty to maintain security and take action against the attackers, it needs, if its response is to be effective, to make more judicious use of force and focus on a political and policy approach that addresses the sense of hopelessness and despair underlying the anger of many Muslims in Rakhine State. Complicating this is that Aung San Suu Kyi has some influence, but under the constitution no direct control over the military.

The insurgent group, which refers to itself as Harakah al-Yaqin (Faith Movement, HaY), is led by a committee of Rohingya émigrés in Saudi Arabia and is commanded on the ground by Rohingya with international training and experience in modern guerrilla war tactics. It benefits from the legitimacy provided by local and international fatwas (religious judicial opinions) in support of its cause and enjoys considerable sympathy and backing from Muslims in northern Rakhine State, including several hundred locally trained recruits.

The emergence of this well-organised, apparently well-funded group is a game-changer in the Myanmar government’s efforts to address the complex challenges in Rakhine State, which include longstanding discrimination against its Muslim population, denial of rights and lack of citizenship. The current use of disproportionate military force in response to the attacks, which fails to adequately distinguish militants from civilians, together with denial of humanitarian assistance to an extremely vulnerable population and the lack of an overarching political strategy that would offer them some hope for the future, is unlikely to dislodge the group and risks generating a spiral of violence and potential mass displacement.

HaY would not have been able to establish itself and make detailed preparations without the buy-in of some local leaders and communities. Yet, this has never been a radicalised population, and the majority of the community, its elders and religious leaders have previously eschewed violence as counterproductive. The fact that more people are now embracing violence reflects deep policy failures over many years rather than any sort of inevitability.

It is important for the government’s response to start from an appreciation of why a violent reaction from some Muslims in Rakhine State has emerged. The population has seen its rights progressively eroded, its gradual marginalisation from social and political life, and rights abuses. This has become particularly acute since the 2012 anti-Muslim violence in Rakhine. Disenfranchisement prior to the 2015 elections severed the last link with politics and means of influence. At the same time, the disruption of maritime migration routes to Malaysia closed a vital escape valve, particularly for young men whose only tangible hope for the future was dashed. An increasing sense of despair has driven more people to consider a violent response, but it is not too late for the government to reverse the trend.

It requires recognising first that these people have lived in the area for generations and will continue to do so. Ways must be found to give them a place in the nation’s life. A heavy-handed security response that fails to respect fundamental principles of proportionality and distinction is not only in violation of international norms; it is also deeply counterproductive. It will likely create further despair and animosity, increasing support for HaY and further entrenching violence. International experience strongly suggests that an aggressive military response, particularly if not embedded in a broader policy framework, will be ineffective against the armed group and has the potential to considerably aggravate matters.

So far, though there are indications of some training and solidarity, HaY does not appear to have a transnational jihadist or terrorist agenda. But there are risks that if the government mishandles the situation, including by continued use of disproportionate force that has driven tens of thousands from their homes or across the border to Bangladesh, it could create conditions for further radicalising sections of the Rohingya population that transnational jihadists could exploit to pursue their own agendas in the country. To avoid that requires subordinating the security response and integrating it into a well-crafted, overarching political strategy – building stronger, more positive relations between Muslim communities and the Myanmar state and closer cooperation and intelligence sharing with regional countries.

Yangon/Brussels, 15 December 2016

https://www.crisisgroup.org/asia/south- ... hine-state

The Muslim minority in Myanmar has also in the past shown ambitions to break away from the Myanmar state.
The neighbouring country Bangladesh refuses to let the fleeing fellow Muslims into the country. One can only surmise why, although I hav a good idea about those reasons.
The so-called Rohiyngas are in fact originally from Bangladesh, albeit some from long ago.
Obviously the Myanmar authorities see those Muslims as a fifth column, a threat to the unity of the state, and would like them to go away.
#14752887
Hong Wu wrote:Myanmar has hundreds of ethnic groups with a history of co-existence, I wonder what got this one group singled out?


lol. No, just no.
#14754776
Border guards stop 340 Rohingyas from entering Bangladesh

Image


Border Guard Bangladesh (BGB) has intercepted 34 boats carrying at least 340 Rohingyas at border points near Cox's Bazar and pushed them back in to Myanmar.

The Muslim ethnic community had been trying to flee persecution in the Rakhina state of Myanmar.

“They were turned back from Fuler Dale, Jadimura and Kanjormarha points of Naf River (on the border between Bangladesh and Myanmar) early on Sunday,” said Teknaf-based BGB Battalion’s Major Abu Russel Siddiqui.

“The boats tried to intrude into Bangladesh’s territorial water by crossing the zero point. BGB patrols compelled them to go back to Myanmar,” he said.

Each of the boat carried around 10 people, added the BGB official.

An army crackdown on the Rohingya Muslims in Rakhine started after nine police officers were killed by ‘insurgents’ on the border along Myanmar on Oct 9.

Dodging the 'strict vigilance' by BGB, many of the persecuted community have already managed to sneak in to Bangladesh and taken shelter here.

Major Russel claimed that more than 459 boats carrying Rohingyas have been turned back since Dec 1.

Bangladesh has been under considerable pressure to accept the Rohingyas on humanitarian grounds.

But Dhaka says that the Rohingya problem should be settled by international pressure on Myanmar and Bangladesh, as an over-populated country, has no space for huge numbers of migrants from across the border.

http://bdnews24.com/bangladesh/2016/12/ ... bangladesh

Nobody lets them in, not Malaysia, not Bangladesh.
Nobody wants them.
#14755454
Are those evil Buddhists at it again? Those Buddhists just can't stop genociding people. Buddhists are known for violence, you only have to think of Bruce Lee. But that Muslims should again be the innocent victims so soon after they were viciously attacked by the Yazhidis.

I don''t think its that people don't care, its just that Muslims are the innocent victims of Islamphobic haters in so many places in the world that its difficult to keep up.
#14756787
It's safe to say I personally couldn't care less. We can set aside the fact for a moment that Al-Jazeera is a mouthpiece of the Qatari government which is sponsoring the most virulent Islamist paramilitary groups from the Levant to the Horn of Africa and not a trustworthy source for anything involving the relation of Sunni Muslims to the government of the country they're located in. Beyond that, even if every report was true, this is not even "genocide" in the traditional sense of the term by any means, but sporadic acts of ethnoreligious cleansing designed to alter the demography of a restive province over time. It's very much in line with the multi-decade low-intensity civil conflict we've witnessed in many areas across Myanmar outside Arakan. This is nothing new. Whether taking place under a strict military government (junta) or a hybrid state as exists now with the military retaining huge influence while some additional democratic features have been grafted on top of the system to assuage the public and the ruling class interested in actively ending the long period of isolation, copying some of China's economic success and attracting FDI - Under either form of government their core domestic outlook has remained the same, and that is one which places primary interest in stability and cohesion.

Further, historically Myanmar was for the longest time a Buddhist country and it is preferable that Buddhism retains its predominance there and that children of the Dharmic faiths in South and Southeast Asia can not be further dispossessed of their inheritance on their and their co-religionists' own land by the disciples of a proselytizing creed and the political and armed militancy it spawns. Anything they have to do to keep the Buddhist character of their country is something I support, and if they're wise they'll keep it under wraps with a shiny and presentable bow as much as possible so as to avoid making overseas busybodies unable to stomach their dinner with the evening news.
#14756993
anarchist23 wrote:https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=6A3kHImkK6s


Genocide in Myanmar and no one cares because the Rohingya are Muslims.



Al Jazeera




No one should care what countries do to its own people, unless it some how interferes with your nations interests.
#14771861
This is an update from United Nations Human Rights.

Our new report concludes that the widespread violations against the Rohingya population in Myanmar indicate the very likely commission of crimes against humanity. “The killing of people as they prayed, fished to feed their families or slept in their homes, the brutal beating of children as young as two and an elderly woman aged 80 – the perpetrators of these violations, and those who ordered them, must be held accountable,” said UN Human Rights Chief Zeid said. “The Government of Myanmar must immediately halt these grave human rights violations against its own people, instead of continuing to deny they have occurred, and accepts the responsibility to ensure that victims have access to justice, reparations and safety.”


https://www.facebook.com/unitednationsh ... ED&fref=nf
#14771872
This is an update from United Nations Human Rights.


No one cares what they think anymore. They are simply a mouthpiece for the liberal globalist agenda and should be viewed as any other propaganda outlet.
#14771883
I am completely opposed to Western interference in the internal affairs of other countries.

What can we actually do? I support giving aid and other forms of support, but unless we invade Myanmar, the situation is not going to change. Western officials can visit Yangon and kindly ask the leadership to be nice to the Rohingya and all they will do is agree while doing absolutely nothing. Sanctions will just make the lives of the ordinary Myanmar citizens miserable.

There are not many options to pursue.
#14771894
One Degree wrote:No one cares what they think anymore. They are simply a mouthpiece for the liberal globalist agenda and should be viewed as any other propaganda outlet.


The international criminal court is catching up with these fuckers. One by One. Mark my words. You can't escape from Human Rights obligations. You should read a book on this subject instead of expressing your ignorance.
#14771897
Myanmar wants nothing to do with those Rohyingas and considers them illegal immigrants from Bangladesh. Some of them might have come some generations ago, but they are linguistically, ethnically and religiously identical to Bangladeshis.
There have been some independence movements among those Rohyingas earlier in the 20th Century and also now they are known to have elements within extreme Islamist organisations in the Gulf.

The situation is indeed dire for them. The Myanmar Authorities do not allow journalists and NGOs in the province and they are making life for the Rohyingas impossible. They want them out of the country, they consider them foreign agents that will only cause more problems in the future.

Neighbour Bangladesh does not want them to cross the border and come back. 70,000 have already sneaked in the last couple of months and there were already 200,000 living in camps near the border.

Bangladesh now wants to move them to an uninhabited island in the Delta and send them back as soon as possible where they came from. Myanmar is stalling that plan.

The outrage is mainly from Muslim countries like Malaysia and the Organisation of Islamic countries. And of course the Human Rights Organisation of the UN, whose chief is also a Muslim. (and anarchist23 from Pofo).

Nobody else gives a damn about them. Maybe they should be relocated to some fellow Muslim country ? Indonesia ? Malaysia ? Saudi Arabia ?

Meanwhile, China and especially Singapore do not care about politics or human rights and have been establishing themselves in the country long before the military allowed some democracy back. Right now European business people are flocking to Yangon to set up garment factories (run by Chinese, for the European market).
#14771899
The international criminal court is catching up with these fuckers. One by One. Mark my words. You can't escape from Human Rights obligations. You should read a book on this subject instead of expressing your ignorance.


Yes, I need to read another book on why one set of morals is correct for the entire world and why it is necessary to add to the list every year. I believe the UN now says we have the human right to the internet. Do you not find it surprising all of these 'rights' are based upon Western philosophy and there is nothing globally human about them. Ignorance is believing you know what is right for everyone.

Edit:
Article 1 Right to Equality
Article 2 Freedom from Discrimination
Article 3 Right to Life, Liberty, Personal Security
Article 4 Freedom from Slavery
Article 5 Freedom from Torture and Degrading Treatment
Article 6 Right to Recognition as a Person before the Law
Article 7 Right to Equality before the Law
Article 8 Right to Remedy by Competent Tribunal
Article 9 Freedom from Arbitrary Arrest and Exile
Article 10 Right to Fair Public Hearing
Article 11 Right to be Considered Innocent until Proven Guilty
Article 12 Freedom from Interference with Privacy, Family, Home and Correspondence
Article 13 Right to Free Movement in and out of the Country
Article 14 Right to Asylum in other Countries from Persecution
Article 15 Right to a Nationality and the Freedom to Change It
Article 16 Right to Marriage and Family
Article 17 Right to Own Property
Article 18 Freedom of Belief and Religion
Article 19 Freedom of Opinion and Information
Article 20 Right of Peaceful Assembly and Association
Article 21 Right to Participate in Government and in Free Elections
Article 22 Right to Social Security
Article 23 Right to Desirable Work and to Join Trade Unions
Article 24 Right to Rest and Leisure
Article 25 Right to Adequate Living Standard
Article 26 Right to Education
Article 27 Right to Participate in the Cultural Life of Community
Article 28 Right to a Social Order that Articulates this Document
Article 29 Community Duties Essential to Free and Full Development
Article 30 Freedom from State or Personal Interference in the above Rights


Strange how similar this looks to the concept of western democracy. :lol:
#14771909
One Degree wrote:Yes, I need to read another book on why one set of morals is correct for the entire world and why it is necessary to add to the list every year. I believe the UN now says we have the human right to the internet. Do you not find it surprising all of these 'rights' are based upon Western philosophy and there is nothing globally human about them. Ignorance is believing you know what is right for everyone.

Edit:
Strange how similar this looks to the concept of western democracy. :lol:



I believe the UN now says we have the human right to the internet.


Wake up and read a book. Your statement is bullshit.
Humans have fundamental rights in International Law. Prohibition of torture, of genocide, of crimes against humanity, of war crimes, of apartheid, of slavery. This is applied globally.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 9
Is It Okay To Be White?

@Pants-of-dog , I listen to actual Hawaiian lead[…]

Exactly. The Republicans would never put a celebri[…]

"Human Rights" lies

Most of EU public opinion doesn't care that they a[…]

First they are spreadig antisemitism, then they ar[…]