Genocide in Myanmar and no one cares. - Page 5 - Politics Forum.org | PoFo

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#14773316
@Ter

We had a South Sudanese woman over for Xmas day otherwise she would have been on her own. She is a refugee living in Kenya, daughter of a professor and is studying Human Rights Law at the university with my wife. She had some interesting stuff to say about the conflict. You have the arab Sudanese in the north and black african Sudanese in the south.
There are five Turkish judges also doing a Masters in Human Rights Law, as well. Education is the key in stemming the number of atrocities and human rights abuses against civilians around the world.
#14773317
Ter, Israel gets the attention it does because we fund its crimes and basically, it's the only state in the world that acts the way it does (and gets away with it).

As for coverage on this issue, it's hardly reported in the West. I've not seen it on any TV or newspapers here so far and the few people I do hear about it from, are people living near the region or working on human rights stuff, via Twitter. Otherwise, it's not getting much attention, but why you complain about what little attention it does get, is a bit baffling, considering people are being raped, murdered, abused etc. And if you have complaints/worries of other issues not being covered, you are of course free to share that information in a new topic.
#14773319
It is kinda fun when people have nothing but disrespect and incredulity for Amnesty International and other "bleeding heart" organizations, ignore all of their reports, then wonder why no one is pointing out these human rights violations.
#14774091
It's the same old story. People don't like/want refugees and that includes Bangladesh. The cost of housing and keeping the Rohingy would be covered by international aid organisations. I can't see what the problem is.

The Bangladeshi government should immediately drop its plan to transfer Rohingya refugees to an uninhabited, undeveloped coastal island, Human Rights Watch said today. Relocating the refugees from the Cox’s Bazar area to Thengar Char island would deprive them of their rights to freedom of movement, livelihood, food and education, in violation of Bangladesh’s obligations under international human rights law.

Between 300,000 and 500,000 Rohingya Muslim refugees, most of them unregistered by the authorities, are in Bangladesh after fleeing persecution in Burma dating back to the 1990s. Since October 2016, nearly 69,000 Rohingya from Rakhine State in Burma have entered Bangladesh to escape attacks by Burmese security forces, including unlawful killings, sexual violence and wholesale destruction of villages.

“The Bangladesh government is making the ridiculous claim that relocating Rohingya refugees to an island with absolutely no facilities that is deluged at high tide and submerged during the monsoon season will improve their living conditions,” said Brad Adams, Asia director. “This proposal is both cruel and unworkable and should be abandoned.”

The plan to move long-term refugees to Thengar Char was first suggested in 2015, but was shelved after widespread condemnation.

A 2015 letter from the Bangladeshi government on the appropriate location to relocate the refugees stated that it must “minimize conflicts between Bangladeshis and Rohingya.” Thengar Chor was apparently chosen because of its distance from inhabited areas – it is 30 kilometers from the populated Hatiya island and a long journey from existing Rohingya camps.

The government revived the plan in early February 2017 following the new influx of Rohingya refugees. Officials contended that the new arrivals pose a law and order and a public health problem, but have produced no evidence to support this claim. In addition, the government has issued warnings against new arrivals mixing with the general population and established committees to increase security around the camps to prevent refugees from exiting the camps or “intermingling” with Bangladeshi citizens.

A cabinet order, passed on January 26, 2017, is unclear as to whether all Rohingya in Bangladesh would be transferred or only new arrivals. However, State Minister for Foreign Affairs Mohammad Shahriar Alom has said that, “The Rohingya will live [in Thengar Char] temporarily and our desire is that the Myanmar [Burma] government will take them back as soon as possible.”

Journalists who have visited Thengar Char island, which emerged from river silt deposited in the Bay of Bengal just a decade ago, describe it as empty and featureless, subject to cyclones and flooding. During monsoon season, the island is submerged; anyone living on the island will have to be evacuated, and any infrastructure would be damaged. The government announced that it will build embankments around the island to stave off the constant flooding, but similar islands along the coast have long faced flooding and frequent evacuations despite government interventions. One government official from the area, speaking anonymously to the BBC, said that sending people to live there was “a terrible idea,” noting that the island is "only accessible during winter and is a haven for pirates."

Instead of dumping Rohingya on a flooded island, the government should be seeking immediate donor support to improve existing conditions for the refugees.

Aid agencies, including the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), which administers the refugee camps, expressed alarm over the revival of this plan, and said that any relocation of the refugees to Thengar Char must be voluntary, and be done through a consultative process after a feasibility study has been completed.

Human Rights Watch regards Rohingya people who flee from Burma to Bangladesh to be prima facie refugees for four reasons. First, the Burmese government has effectively denied its Rohingya minority citizenship, failing to protect them and itself perpetrating rampant and systemic violation of their human rights, including restrictions on movement; limitations on access to health care, livelihood, shelter, and education; arbitrary arrests and detention; and forced labor. Second, because of Burma’s discriminatory citizenship policies, it also refuses to cooperate in the repatriation of Rohingya, itself a denial of the human right of any person to return to their country, and the basis for a sur place claim to refugee status. Third, Bangladesh is not a party to the 1951 Refugee Convention, and has neither registered Rohingya as refugees since the early 1990s, nor allowed them to lodge asylum claims, thereby abdicating its responsibility to determine their status. Finally, a person does not become a refugee because of recognition, but is recognized because they meet the refugee definition, so refugees in Bangladesh do not forfeit their rights as refugees simply because the authorities have not recognized their status.

“The Bangladeshi government needs to treat the persecuted Rohingya humanely, but they shouldn’t have to go it alone,” Adams said. “Instead of dumping Rohingya on a flooded island, the government should be seeking immediate donor support to improve existing conditions for the refugees.”


© Reuters/Mohammad Ponir Hossain
HRW
#14774093
anarchist23 wrote:It's the same old story. People don't like/want refugees and that includes Bangladesh. The cost of housing and keeping the Rohingy would be covered by international aid organisations. I can't see what the problem is.

To start with, Bangladesh is already overpopulated.
Secondly, there is the geopolitical angle : having an adjacent province of Burma with lots of Muslims is convenient to let people emigrate to that place (there is a lot of room there). I think the Burmese indigenous population is aware of this. The same thing is happening from Bangladesh into Assam in India. Hence India is building a wall between the two countries,

And thirdly, like I said earlier, the Bangladesh Government wants to avoid the refugees integrating in the local population because they are indistinguishable.
#14774096
The Rohinga have been denied access to education so many are illiterate and innumerate, which makes them unpopular candidates for immigration.
#14774099
Ter wrote:To start with, Bangladesh is already overpopulated.
Secondly, there is the geopolitical angle : having an adjacent province of Burma with lots of Muslims is convenient to let people emigrate to that place (there is a lot of room there). I think the Burmese indigenous population is aware of this. The same thing is happening from Bangladesh into Assam in India. Hence India is building a wall between the two countries. And thirdly, like I said earlier, the Bangladesh Government wants to avoid the refugees integrating in the local population because they are indistinguishable.


Everyone has excuses for not allowing refugees into their country, as in the west. Rohingya will have to be resettled, even if it is temporary. They can't stay in Myanmar as they get brutalised by the locals, police and the army. At least the whole world is watching. As with this short video.

#14774119
The Rohinga have been denied access to education so many are illiterate and innumerate, which makes them unpopular candidates for immigration.


Yes I understand what you mean. I was not criticising your post.
It's not the Rohingyas fault that they are uneducated and that there are always some reason/reasons to not let refugees settle in ones country including the UK.
#14774123
anarchist23 wrote:Yes I understand what you mean. I was not criticising your post.
It's not the Rohingyas fault that they are uneducated and that there are always some reason/reasons to not let refugees settle in ones country including the UK.


Unless a country can demonstrate they have solved their own internal problems, then I fail to see the wisdom of complicating those internal problems by inviting in people with more problems. :?: What should your priorities be?
#14774137
Ter wrote:We could deploy them in the garments industry, they could make the rich Bangladeshis richer and provide you guys with cheap T-shirts and sweaters.


That's what people don't understand. Refugees (if they are allowed to work) and immigrants usually don't mind doing shit jobs that the locals don't want to do, they work hard and pay taxes. (Which pay part of me pension. lol) In Britain the NHS, for example, would collapse without immigrants working for it.

One Degree wrote: Unless a country can demonstrate they have solved their own internal problems, then I fail to see the wisdom of complicating those internal problems by inviting in people with more problems. :?: What should your priorities be?


If the UN are housing, feeding and caring for the refugees, I can't see the problem. We can't sit back and allow genocide, rape and murder to occur especially if we are able to mitigate the suffering. (all 65 million of them)
#14774439
anarchist23 wrote:Yes I understand what you mean. I was not criticising your post.
It's not the Rohingyas fault that they are uneducated and that there are always some reason/reasons to not let refugees settle in ones country including the UK.

Fair enough.

I'm pretty pessimistic about the plight of the Rohinga and previously predicted that they would become a stateless people similar to Europe's Roma. There's been some mild pressure (private words) from Malaysia and Indonesia but I doubt they'd be willing to take the Rohinga's in since that would set a precedent that could be exploited by Arab and African migrants who pass through S.E.A on their quest to reach Australia.
#14774818
Even the former S-G of the UN has repeated that there is no evidence for 'genocide'. This is mostly 'Muslim-are-repressed-victims' mythology, as propagated by NGOs and Left-liberal media outlets. The fact that Malaysia is 'championing' the cause of the Rohingya is also hilarious, given the manner in which they treat Rohingya refugees. Similarly, look at Bangladesh. How do they treat the Rohingya? Or the Petro-Arabs?

The OIC is one of those loud-mouthed "We're victims" clubs, yet they're the most cancerous lot of human rights infringers on this planet.
#14774820
More good news. This is the island where the Rohingya are to be settled. It's not perfect but the Rohingya will be safe from the population of Myanmar. Although not safe from the weather and tides. Again the power of international pressure.

#14774854
Government orders work begin at proposed Rohingya island

Image

The government estimates 400,000 Rohingya refugees are living in Bangladesh, including nearly 70,000 who have arrived since October fleeing violence in Myanmar's western Rakhine state

Bangladesh government has ordered construction to start at a desolate island where it wants to relocate tens of thousands of Rohingya refugees, an official said Thursday, despite warnings the site is uninhabitable.

Government is seeking international support for its plan to relocate the Rohingya to Thengar Char in the Bay of Bengal, an idea that caused outcry when first mooted in 2015. Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina deployed an aide to the remote island Wednesday, who ordered construction begin on a jetty, helipad and visitor facilities, the government official overseeing administration of Thengar Char told AFP.

“He asked that those structures were built promptly, so visitors could have easier access to the island,” said Rezaul Karim, the official who accompanied the prime minister’s aide to Thengar Char, told AFP. “He asked that construction be completed within the next 15 days.”

Karim could not provide a timeline for when the proposed relocation would begin.
Image

The government estimates 400,000 Rohingya refugees are living in Bangladesh, including nearly 70,000 who have arrived since October fleeing violence in Myanmar’s western Rakhine state.

Most of those who fled to Bangladesh live in squalid conditions in refugee camps in Cox’s Bazar district, which borders Rakhine state and is home to the country’s biggest tourist resort.

Last month, government established a committee comprised of state officials in coastal districts to oversee the plan, and ordered authorities to help identify and relocate undocumented Myanmar nationals to the island.

Dhaka has urged the international community to back the proposal, describing it as “temporary” and claiming the Rohingya would have better access to humanitarian assistance.

The proposal has been slammed by rights groups, who have urged Bangladesh to drop its plan to populate the undeveloped 6,000-acre island with refugees.

“The Bangladesh government is making the ridiculous claim that relocating Rohingya refugees to an island with absolutely no facilities that is deluged at high tide and submerged during the monsoon season will improve their living conditions,” said Brad Adams, Asia director at Human Rights Watch, in a statement late Wednesday.

“This proposal is both cruel and unworkable and should be abandoned.”


http://www.dhakatribune.com/bangladesh/ ... ya-island/
#14774919
I don't think "left" is calling for any sort of western "military" intervention but some sort of arm twisting which in this case, I don't see happening any time soon.
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