Saudi Arabia issues mass arrests of senior princes, including billionaire Waleed bin Talal - Page 3 - Politics Forum.org | PoFo

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#14860326
Patrickov wrote:Surely sound like a Trump or Duterte to me. I worry, though, that his comments would enrage some and thus endanger his position.


As I said in my post, Zaytung is the Turkish equivalent of The Onion or Private Eye. It means it is a satirical journal, i.e its content is not necessarily correct in literal sense.

That being said, I still think Zaytung's assessment about the nature of the situation in SA is the most informative and correct one I have ever read so far. :roll:
#14860351
@anasawad

Its hard to tell who's next, however I hold the opinion that the Hashimites of Hijaz will be having many problems soon and will probably have many of their leaders along with their allies in the royal family being killed off or jailed in the upcoming period, as it happens that this new city is planned to be on lands which they own much of it.


Would it be bad for me to say that I want Hejaz to secede from Saudi Arabia and declare independence? Because I certainly wouldn't want to be a part of a country like SA.
#14860537
anasawad wrote:@ness31
You do realize that gulf state ruling royalties have done so before to kill off other branches of the royal family to take their wealth and share in the family wealth, using it to navigate harsh economic circumstances or simply just have extra money.
This has been the story of the gulf monarchies for more than a century now.
And this time is no different. A new heir to the throne with many plans and projects in mind, yet no sufficient funding to do it. He's going to privatize most of the government shares in Aramco, and most estimates says its not enough to complete the Saudi 2030 plans. (it needs over 2 trillion dollar in funding)
So, they're cutting off subsidies from many sectors. Privatizing much of the government businesses. And now it seems eliminating unnecessary royalties who consume 10s and 100s of millions of dollars from state funds and have tons of properties and assets them selves. Also some of them are billionaires who also happened to be rivals.


ADD:
Not to mention the fact that Saudi Arabia is planning to build a new mega city in the northwest of the country, and eliminating rival members of the royal family is necessary for the the throne to hold full control over it and have the full benefit of it.

Its hard to tell who's next, however I hold the opinion that the Hashimites of Hijaz will be having many problems soon and will probably have many of their leaders along with their allies in the royal family being killed off or jailed in the upcoming period, as it happens that this new city is planned to be on lands which they own much of it.


Hi Anasawad :) I do understand the concept of a family feud, ‘Arab style’ :p and thanks to you I now know more about the Hashemites. I was reading up on the mega city you speak of and remember it sounding a lot like the PoFo username Noemon. It should be exciting but will probably resemble another one of those ultra modern gulf city places. It’s like they all have the same town planner :hmm: Is it worth all the possible bloodshed you speak of?

It’s also well publicised that the young Prince seeks to reform some of the older methods of doing business in SA and easing up on social restrictions. Good luck to him :)

And while I have you here Anasawad, I want to ask you, what do you think I meant when I wrote this post?

ness31 wrote:I guess it’s a coincidence that all the women in Iran wear indistinguishable garb and that the same happens with the men in SA. Total. Coincidence.


Because I suspect you think I’m mocking or judging the dress of these two nations, when in actual fact I am pointing out quite plainly and with no malice, that the men of SA and the women of Iran both have dress codes that allow them to blend in and make the individual unidentifiable. It was a response to the Zaytung article. It seems like a minor point, but I don’t think it is. That’s all :)
#14860706
@ness31
Its called Neom, It means new future and it'll be an industrial tech city.

My post was a response to this post of yours
Don’t forget, Saudi Arabia give Sophia citizenship. Again, Total. Coincidence.



that the men of SA and the women of Iran both have dress codes that allow them to blend in and make the individual unidentifiable.

Men in Saudi Arabia don't have an official dress code, simply there is a traditional white dress but not all wear it.
Women in Iran don't have a united dress code, and the religious dress code isn't in all provinces.
However in more conservative provinces and districts, women tend to wear the black dress for religious occasions and mosque visitation, other than that they wear all sort of things.
#14861666
It wont. Saudi Arabia needs someone to do their bidding to get any hand in Lebanon.
The Sunnis in Lebanon are already angry that Harriri is being held against his well, and pretty much all Sunni public figures are angry about it and believe his resignation is not legit.
The President did not accept the resignation until now so its not really official yet.
Hezbollah and AMAL movement haven't commented on anything yet, as they along with the Christian parties are keeping media silence to not risk escalating any sectarian tensions on the issue and are waiting for Hariri to come back to Lebanon.

Will there be a war in Lebanon ? No. Will there be terrorist attacks supported by Saudi Arabia ? Yes, those already happen and are stopped literally on daily basis due to the massive security build up in the country.
#14861668
anasawad wrote:@ness31
Its called Neom, It means new future and it'll be an industrial tech city.

My post was a response to this post of yours




Men in Saudi Arabia don't have an official dress code, simply there is a traditional white dress but not all wear it.
Women in Iran don't have a united dress code, and the religious dress code isn't in all provinces.
However in more conservative provinces and districts, women tend to wear the black dress for religious occasions and mosque visitation, other than that they wear all sort of things
.


The amount of lies you spill here are truly amazing, bet you don't even blink writing the bold knowing well it's a LIE. Women don't have a dress code in iran? I would pay you to walk through the city in short, a skirt or a dress. Would you be alive to come back and tells us how was strolling around town " wearing all sorts of things" ??
#14861678
@Politiks
No, they don't. You can check the legal code or constitution for it.
Note that the constitution doesn't talk about these things, and each province have its own legal code defined by its courts. You know, basic structural politics that anyone who ever bothered reading about the Iranian system would know.
Some provinces (those with clerical governments) have a modesty code (not the same as a dress code) which enforces women to wear a hijab. Other provinces don't have that.
No province in Iran however have a unified dress code. (only in religious places there is a dress code)
Unless ofcourse you don't know what a dress code is.

And yes, I can say women in most can wear pretty much anything.
My sister, who lives in Iran, lives in Semnan province where there is a reformist government and no modesty code, so she doesn't have to wear a hijab and can wear pretty much anything she likes, yes that includes dresses and skirts and whatever. She works in Tehran, where there is a clerical government elected and there is a modesty code (not a dress code), she has to wear a head scarf there but not necessirly covering her entire head or hair and nor does it have to be of any certain color and she, like the majority of women in provinces with clerical government, wears it like a fashion item.
You can easily check this information BTW, it takes a single look at any domestic Iranian media channels to get a very good idea about the laws in each province.
Like weed for example, where in the east its legal and in the west you go to jail for it. It kinda comes with having expanded rights for local governments.

Now why don't you go fuck yourself and try checking facts before you poison the air with your bullshit ?
#14861691
@ness31
Examples of both:
Modesty code: You have to wear head scarf, regardless of what type or color or etc. Or you have to dress around a certain level of modesty in general.
(This does exist in provinces where clerics are elected to provincial governments in Iran, however there are many provinces where the elected governments do not hold such. It generally depends on which party or movement the given province elects to manage their province and decide their laws.)

Dress code: You have to wear this exact type of dresses with this color, look,etc. A unified dress code.
This does not exist anywhere with the exception of in Mosques and Shrines, also exists in Churches, Synagogues and Temples. i.e religious places.
#14861698
Well as far as I’m concerned, if I was obligated to wear a hat everywhere I went in public I’d call it a dress code - a unified one at that. Particularly since there isn’t anything practically immodest about hair. Don’t start on the finer Islamic points of why they wear one, I know the reasoning behind it and frankly it’s just an excuse.

Regardless of whether there’s a cleric in a provence or not, and even though you can technically wear any colour of the rainbow in Iran, the women still go out in publicin long black super hero capes and the men never wear shorts. I don’t know how to explain it. They’re smart people who know how to work as a unit. Embrace it Anasawad. Be proud, but don’t deny it.

And don’t tell me to do research just because I hold a different view to you :) You’ve said it to me a couple times and I’ve politely turned my cheek. After all, you cannot possibly know the depths of my research and I can’t possibly verify that you’re Iranian :lol:
#14861704
@ness31
The fact that there are lots of people who follow conservative Islam in Iran and wear things they believe are religiously required does not mean its mandates by law.
The black cape is not required by law anywhere, yet many wear it specially in conservative provinces.
Hijab is not required to be worn in all provinces, yet you'll find women who wear it in provinces where its not obliged to be worn.

The argument isn't whether people wear such things or not, the argument you and politik are making is that its the law to wear it.
And in that you're wrong, its not the law to wear such things outside religious places and the modesty code as said exists in some places but not in others.
Infact, you don't need to go into the legal code of every province to know that, you can easily follow the arguments happening in the parliament where the clerics routinely try to enforce these laws on everyone by including it in the constitution and always keep failing to do that.
The enforcement of Islamic laws specially on public behavior, clothes and drugs is literally over half of what the parliament keep discussing because the clerics keep trying to get what they want.

the women still go out in publicin long black super hero capes

Not really no, as said while some places are more conservative than others in these regards, you can see women wearing all types of things (as in not all wear the black cape). You can easily find pictures on this.

the men never wear shorts.

I doubt you'll find lots of men wearing shorts anywhere in the middle east. This again doesn't mean its a law not to wear shorts.
So you're argument that its a law is again wrong.

Don’t start on the finer Islamic points of why they wear one, I know the reasoning behind it and frankly it’s just an excuse.

Technically speaking, Islam doesn't really include the head wear rule. Its more of a tradition thing that the Imams in old times codified into rules because the head scarf was a symbol of modesty and class for women and so they thought Islam wants modesty and this modesty. Not literally like this but metaphorically speaking, there was lots of debates on the topic between major Imams before it became codified in reality.


And don’t tell me to do research just because I hold a different view to you :) You’ve said it to me a couple times and I’ve politely turned my cheek. After all, you cannot possibly know the depths of my research

When you're arguing about something in the legal code or about the constitutional structure in a certain government, there isn't really multiple right answers because the system is already codified.
Iran is a federal system with an expanded role for local governments, the role of provincial governments is so large that their elections get more coverage than the presidential elections.
And yet every single time, westerners just ignore this and consider them irrelevant.
Which pretty much distorts the entire argument, and this is why there is a clear lack of understanding of Iranian politics and the inner workings of Iran.

and I can’t possibly verify that you’re Iranian :lol:

I'm a Lebanese Iranian actually. And if you want to verify, we can meet up. :p
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