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User avatar
By Beren
#14860411
mikema63 wrote:http://thehill.com/homenews/house/359079-paul-ryan-praying-is-the-right-thing-to-do-after-mass-shootings-because-it

What a load of horseshit. :lol:

And who is he praying to? The Koch brothers or Ayn Rand?

He clearly believes hypocrisy works.
By Rich
#14860470
Potemkin wrote:Hmm? No, it's utter nonsense. It's just Rich being Rich again. He has a rather... creative approach to the interpretation of facts.

And what exactly are your facts Potemkin? Give me some facts about Mohammad. If you can I'll be impressed. Perhaps you can follow it up by giving us some facts about Romulus and Remus.
#14860486
Rich wrote:Jews treated Non Jews as filth, who are to dirty to share a meal with. The early Muslims were Jews, who gradually evolved into what we now know as Muslims. Mohaammad's Meccan origin story is a myth designed to hide Islam's Jewish and cosmopolitan origins.

Ignoring your fantasy about the origins of Islam, what you write doesn't even make sense. How are origins in a sect you claim shunned everyone else "cosmopolitan"? Is it just that you automatically associate the word "cosmopolitan" with Jews, and think that therefore it must be something people are ashamed of?
User avatar
By Godstud
#14860525
The real problem:

More Guns Do Not Stop More Crimes, Evidence Shows
More firearms do not keep people safe, hard numbers show. Why do so many Americans believe the opposite?

Most of this research—and there have been several dozen peer-reviewed studies—punctures the idea that guns stop violence. In a 2015 study using data from the FBI and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, for example, researchers at Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard University reported that firearm assaults were 6.8 times more common in the states with the most guns versus those with the least. Also in 2015 a combined analysis of 15 different studies found that people who had access to firearms at home were nearly twice as likely to be murdered as people who did not.
This evidence has been slow to accumulate because of restrictions placed by Congress on one of the country's biggest injury research funders, the CDC. Since the mid-1990s the agency has been effectively blocked from supporting gun violence research. And the NRA and many gun owners have emphasized a small handful of studies that point the other way.

https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... 48162411=1

Texas has Open Carry/Concealed Carry. That failed to stop this. That the shooter was shot AFTER he did it, is pretty much a good demonstration of why this doesn't work.

Also:
Image
By Rich
#14860574
Prosthetic Conscience wrote:Ignoring your fantasy about the origins of Islam, what you write doesn't even make sense. How are origins in a sect you claim shunned everyone else "cosmopolitan"? Is it just that you automatically associate the word "cosmopolitan" with Jews, and think that therefore it must be something people are ashamed of?

When the Arabs captured Jerusalem in 637, they set up worship on the Temple mount. The exact nature of the their religion is not clear and was not clear to observers at the time. The indications suggest that the Arabs prayed towards Jerusalem. The Arabs may well have come from the South, but they may have come from the East as well. The origins of the Koran and the first Arab invaders relationship to the Koran, whether it had been written in 637 again are not clear.

What we can say with reasonable confidence is that the earliest Arabs followed some form of Judaism, but exactly how far it had diverged from the rest of Judaism is again not clear. Its possible that there was some kind of alliance of Jews and Arabs. But later Arabs did become ashamed of their Jewish origins and sought to cover up by the invention of the Meccan origin story. Christianity went through a somewhat similar process of distancing itself from Judaism, rewriting and reinventing its origin stories multiple times. Christianity also used the trope of desert purity counter posed to cosmopolitan corruption.
User avatar
By skinster
#14860579
Your language is a little unclear, Rich, do you have a link I could look at?
User avatar
By ingliz
#14860713
@noir

Why are you monomaniacally chuntering on about Jews and Muslims? According to all accounts, the Texas shooter was a rabidly atheistic White man who hated his mother-in-law.


:?:
#14860915
This past Sunday morning, Devin Patrick Kelley walked into a small country church in the rural south Texas town of Sutherland Springs and shot nearly every single person in the building — brutally slaughtering 26 innocent men, women, and children, and critically injuring at least 20 others.

Armed with an AR-15-style semi-automatic assault rifle, Kelley sprayed the congregation with at least 450 bullets, reloaded, then continued, reloaded, then continued some more, then reloaded again, and continued shooting. He went through 15 magazines of ammunition.

It immediately became the deadliest church shooting in the history of the United States and one of the deadliest mass shootings in our nation’s history.

The attack came just a few weeks after another man, Stephen Paddock, armed with a nearly unstoppable arsenal of semi-automatic weapons, shot an unthinkable 546 people in Las Vegas — and killed 58 of them.

Soon after that shooting, I wrote a column stating that white privilege in America is so strong that even Paddock, the deadliest single mass shooter in American history, was getting preferential treatment in death.

It’s happening again in Texas, but this time it might be worse. Kelley shot and killed multiple children. He shot and killed a pregnant woman. He killed senior citizens. The man had absolutely no regard for human life when he strapped on black tactical gear, loaded up rounds and rounds of ammunition, and walked straight into that church and rained down horror on that close-knit congregation.

We had warning signs galore. Kelley beat his first wife. While in the military, he assaulted his infant stepson so badly that he fractured the boy’s skull, having hit the child with what the Air Force said was “a force likely to produce death or grievous bodily harm.” The chief prosecutor in the case said that Kelley openly admitted to the abuses.

He served only 12 months in a military prison for what he did. To give that perspective, the rapper Meek Mill was just sentenced to two to four years in prison for violating his parole when he was ticketing for riding a dirt bike. I have a friend in prison right now serving several years for selling small amounts of weed to his friends. But Kelley fractured a child’s skull and got out in a year.

After he was released, white privilege continued to protect him in case after case.

Police were called on Kelley multiple times for abusing women. In 2013, he was investigated for rape and sexual assault. After moving to Colorado, police were again called — this time for cruelty to animals, after Kelley was seen punching his dog in the head; he was cited for a misdemeanor.

For the past six months, I’ve spent nearly every waking moment of my life either in the Bronx or studying the New York City borough. I’ve taken a deep dive into neighborhoods where families and children never get a second chance. If you break the law, you go to jail, then you go to prison, normally for a very long time. If you are even suspected of breaking the law, it doesn’t matter if you are a child or a grown man, you go to Rikers, where you may wait for months or even years just to see a judge. In the Bronx, mostly black and brown kids can spend years in jail or prison for crimes they never committed.

White privilege not only protected Devin Kelley in life, it is protecting his name and his actions even in death.

Somehow, these harsh circumstances of the American justice system were never really brought upon Kelley. He lives in a universe altogether different than black and brown families in the Bronx – one in which he gets a perpetual pass, or light sentences, for violence and intimidation.

All the way back in 2012, when he fractured his stepson’s skull, he was supposed to never be able to purchase a firearm again. But the Air Force claims they basically forgot to file the federal paperwork that would’ve flagged Kelley in the system — ultimately allowing him to purchase the assault rifle and ammunition used in his rampage on Sunday.

It was that same white privilege that allowed Kelley to post pictures of his AR-15 on Facebook, bragging about how awesome it was, without even a hint of fear of the ramifications of such a post on social media. The U.S. had already taught Kelley that he could pretty much say or do whatever the hell he felt like doing, and not have the full force of the law visited upon him.

Had any Muslim man in America, particularly a Muslim man with a history of violence, posted pictures of himself on social media with an AR-15, best believe the feds would be knocking on his door.

Like Paddock, white privilege not only protected Kelley in life, it is protecting his name and his actions even in death.

Last week in New York, when a man was arrested in Manhattan for deliberately driving a rented Home Depot pickup truck over unsuspecting pedestrians, killing eight of them, President Donald Trump called the man, Sayfullo Saipov, a “degenerate animal.”

Trump also called on the government to completely terminate an immigration plan that allowed Saipov to enter the country in the first place. He then called Saipov a terrorist. And then Trump said Saipov should get the death penalty.

Day after day, Trump railed against this man — not because of some utilitarian calculous that he caused more harm than Kelley, because he didn’t. From all indications, Saipov also didn’t have a history of violent crime that we know of. Yet he was derided for days on end by Trump. Trump called for “extreme vetting” of all immigrants, the cancellation of government programs, and more — all because of what Saipov did.

Yet when Trump was asked if another type of “extreme vetting” — on those who wish to purchase assault weapons — could’ve stopped the Texas attack or future attacks like it, he flatly said no: It would’ve made “no difference” whatsoever, Trump said.

Kelley, not Saipov, was the man whose history should have indicated to authorities that he posed a risk. He was brutal and cruel everywhere he called home — and yet nothing was done. And yet it is Kelley that the president of the United States treats with kid gloves.

Extreme vetting absolutely could’ve made this attack more difficult to pull off. Had Kelley been banned from purchasing weapons the way he was supposed to be banned, it would’ve presented a significant obstacle on his path. Had the justice system taken his repeated violent acts seriously, it could’ve set into motion government and other actions to prevent Kelley from hurting people. A ban on assault rifles could’ve made it much more difficult for Kelley to get the gun he used.

Yet here we are — more horror and violence — in a country determined to protect the white men causing it, in life and in death.This past Sunday morning, Devin Patrick Kelley walked into a small country church in the rural south Texas town of Sutherland Springs and shot nearly every single person in the building — brutally slaughtering 26 innocent men, women, and children, and critically injuring at least 20 others.

Armed with an AR-15-style semi-automatic assault rifle, Kelley sprayed the congregation with at least 450 bullets, reloaded, then continued, reloaded, then continued some more, then reloaded again, and continued shooting. He went through 15 magazines of ammunition.

It immediately became the deadliest church shooting in the history of the United States and one of the deadliest mass shootings in our nation’s history.

The attack came just a few weeks after another man, Stephen Paddock, armed with a nearly unstoppable arsenal of semi-automatic weapons, shot an unthinkable 546 people in Las Vegas — and killed 58 of them.

Soon after that shooting, I wrote a column stating that white privilege in America is so strong that even Paddock, the deadliest single mass shooter in American history, was getting preferential treatment in death. Virtually any nonwhite shooter would have seen their story and their communities treated in a less preferential way.

It’s happening again in Texas, but this time it might be worse. Kelley shot and killed multiple children. He shot and killed a pregnant woman. He killed senior citizens. The man had absolutely no regard for human life when he strapped on black tactical gear, loaded up rounds and rounds of ammunition, and walked straight into that church and rained down horror on that close-knit congregation.

We had warning signs galore. Kelley beat his first wife. While in the military, he assaulted his infant stepson so badly that he fractured the boy’s skull, having hit the child with what the Air Force said was “a force likely to produce death or grievous bodily harm.” The chief prosecutor in the case said that Kelley openly admitted to the abuses.

He served only 12 months in a military prison for what he did. To give that perspective, the rapper Meek Mill was just sentenced to two to four years in prison for violating his parole when he was ticketing for riding a dirt bike. I have a friend in prison right now serving several years for selling small amounts of weed to his friends. But Kelley fractured a child’s skull and got out in a year.

After he was released, white privilege continued to protect him in case after case.

Police were called on Kelley multiple times for abusing women. In 2013, he was investigated for rape and sexual assault. After moving to Colorado, police were again called — this time for cruelty to animals, after Kelley was seen punching his dog in the head; he was cited for a misdemeanor.

Kelley was given break after break. We need to examine how that happens.
A law enforcement official walks past the First Baptist Church of Sutherland Springs, the scene of a mass shooting, Sunday, Nov. 5, 2017, in Sutherland Springs, Texas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

For the past six months, I’ve spent nearly every waking moment of my life either in the Bronx or studying the New York City borough. I’ve taken a deep dive into neighborhoods where families and children never get a second chance. If you break the law, you go to jail, then you go to prison, normally for a very long time. If you are even suspected of breaking the law, it doesn’t matter if you are a child or a grown man, you go to Rikers, where you may wait for months or even years just to see a judge. In the Bronx, mostly black and brown kids can spend years in jail or prison for crimes they never committed.

White privilege not only protected Devin Kelley in life, it is protecting his name and his actions even in death.

Somehow, these harsh circumstances of the American justice system were never really brought upon Kelley. He lives in a universe altogether different than black and brown families in the Bronx – one in which he gets a perpetual pass, or light sentences, for violence and intimidation.

All the way back in 2012, when he fractured his stepson’s skull, he was supposed to never be able to purchase a firearm again. But the Air Force claims they basically forgot to file the federal paperwork that would’ve flagged Kelley in the system — ultimately allowing him to purchase the assault rifle and ammunition used in his rampage on Sunday.

It was that same white privilege that allowed Kelley to post pictures of his AR-15 on Facebook, bragging about how awesome it was, without even a hint of fear of the ramifications of such a post on social media. The U.S. had already taught Kelley that he could pretty much say or do whatever the hell he felt like doing, and not have the full force of the law visited upon him.

Had any Muslim man in America, particularly a Muslim man with a history of violence, posted pictures of himself on social media with an AR-15, best believe the feds would be knocking on his door.

Like Paddock, white privilege not only protected Kelley in life, it is protecting his name and his actions even in death.

Last week in New York, when a man was arrested in Manhattan for deliberately driving a rented Home Depot pickup truck over unsuspecting pedestrians, killing eight of them, President Donald Trump called the man, Sayfullo Saipov, a “degenerate animal.”

Trump also called on the government to completely terminate an immigration plan that allowed Saipov to enter the country in the first place. He then called Saipov a terrorist. And then Trump said Saipov should get the death penalty.

Day after day, Trump railed against this man — not because of some utilitarian calculous that he caused more harm than Kelley, because he didn’t. From all indications, Saipov also didn’t have a history of violent crime that we know of. Yet he was derided for days on end by Trump. Trump called for “extreme vetting” of all immigrants, the cancellation of government programs, and more — all because of what Saipov did.

Yet when Trump was asked if another type of “extreme vetting” — on those who wish to purchase assault weapons — could’ve stopped the Texas attack or future attacks like it, he flatly said no: It would’ve made “no difference” whatsoever, Trump said.

Kelley, not Saipov, was the man whose history should have indicated to authorities that he posed a risk. He was brutal and cruel everywhere he called home — and yet nothing was done. And yet it is Kelley that the president of the United States treats with kid gloves.

Extreme vetting absolutely could’ve made this attack more difficult to pull off. Had Kelley been banned from purchasing weapons the way he was supposed to be banned, it would’ve presented a significant obstacle on his path. Had the justice system taken his repeated violent acts seriously, it could’ve set into motion government and other actions to prevent Kelley from hurting people. A ban on assault rifles could’ve made it much more difficult for Kelley to get the gun he used.

Yet here we are — more horror and violence — in a country determined to protect the white men causing it, in life and in death.
https://theintercept.com/2017/11/08/tex ... privilege/
#14860931
Beren wrote:One must be a really unscrupulous person to come up with Muslims and Islam anytime something like that happens, like it's a typical Muslim thing. However, liberalism can be blamed here as US gun laws are very liberal indeed. (The constitution is misinterpreted though.)

I haven't heard anything from SonofNewo on this, but it is another example where the story doesn't make sense, the shooter is dead, and the US Air Force forgot to put his criminal history in the background check database, which would have precluded him from purchasing the firearm legally.

Godstud wrote::lol: Your gun would not protect you against your government, which is armed with tanks, helicopters, drones and missiles. But hey, you can pretend.

They've found fighting the Taliban isn't so easy...
User avatar
By Godstud
#14860933
So blackjack21, you can tell me about all these great Taliban victories, then.

No?

:lol:

The Taliban, what's left of it, operates out of a different country, because they got their asses kicked out.
By noir
#14860939
The Islamist propagandist

It was that same white privilege that allowed Kelley to post pictures of his AR-15 on Facebook, bragging about how awesome it was, without even a hint of fear of the ramifications of such a post on social media. The U.S. had already taught Kelley that he could pretty much say or do whatever the hell he felt like doing, and not have the full force of the law visited upon him.

Had any Muslim man in America, particularly a Muslim man with a history of violence, posted pictures of himself on social media with an AR-15, best believe the feds would be knocking on his door.

Like Paddock, white privilege not only protected Kelley in life, it is protecting his name and his actions even in death.


This is the issue. Texas is just excuse.
#14860946
noir wrote:The Islamist propagandist



This is the issue. Texas is just excuse.


Sometimes you post anti-Islam stuff, other times you post anti-anti-Islam stuff. And you use very simple sentences with very little explanation (if there is at all). This makes me VERY confused.

I am afraid you should learn more about language and presentation before saying whatever you want to say. By any chance, are you still a graded school student?
#14860955
@Patrickov what do you mean by "anti anti Islam stuff"? For too long the EU colluded with them, so they are the chief responsible for the current situation. Is it anti anti Islam to point the obvious?

Here, some middle aged French try to regain their French identity against the creeping colorization, too little too late.

By Rich
#14861914
anasawad wrote:https://youtu.be/OT5Lw-6PayI

Typical leftie lies. Britain's military has been far, far more protected from criticism than the American. Returning Vets from Vietnam were openly called baby killers. No America is so violent because its been multicultural since birth. Why do people think Africa has been so violent since decolonisation? far more violent than the United States. Africa's states are virtually all multicultural hell holes, but no lets it blame it on the White man.

And please, please stop this straw manning. None of us have denied that White Antia types can be dangerous. Amazing some self hating White Liberal, dressed in Antifa uniform goes and shoots up some White Christian Conservatives and this is supposed to be an example of White privilege. Luckily a brave NRA man was able to stop this degenerate before he did even more damage.
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