India protests: Students condemn 'barbaric' police - Page 2 - Politics Forum.org | PoFo

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#15056259
I found you comment is so funny.

Don't you know how American and British Police treat their citizens with teargas etc?

Here's a snippet I randonly searched from the internet about how American police treat American protestors.

Occupy Oakland: police fire teargas and baton rounds at ...
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2011/ ... e-tear-gas
Oct 26, 2011 · Police have used teargas after scuffles broke out between officers and protesters demonstrating against dozens of arrests at an Occupy Wall Street camp in Oakland, California.


When it comes to defiance of the authories, almost all the police would do so.
#15058337
As OP I have responsibility to provide updates.

Amrit Dhillon wrote:India Campus Attack: Police Fail to Make Arrests but Charge Injured Student

Police in Delhi have faced criticism for failing to arrest any members of a violent mob that stormed the campus of the Jawarharlal Nehru University (JNU) in the Indian capital, while at the same time charging a student leader beaten over the head with a metal bar with two offences.

Police have been accused of failing to intervene when about 50 masked men went on the rampage on Sunday evening, attacking students and academic staff, and vandalising buildings and property. More than 30 people were injured.

Aishe Ghosh – the leader of protests at the university in Delhi – needed about 16 stitches for a deep gash in her head. On Monday she said she only survived by falling down and playing dead, adding that she felt as if she was being “lynched”.

“They first vandalised a car parked nearby before besieging us. My sister managed to escape, but my friend and I were caught by the mob. They first struck me on my head with a rod before kicking and thrashing me.

“I screamed at them that they couldn’t do that, but they didn’t stop,” she said. Ghosh and other students have called on the university’s vice-chancellor, Jagadish Kumar, to resign over the incident.

Delhi police have yet to identify or detain any assailants. They say they are currently examining video clips and WhatsApp chats.

Meanwhile, they have charged Ghosh, and several other students, with attacking security guards during a prior incident on Saturday. They are accused of vandalising a server room and of destroying fibre-optic cables.

“They damaged servers and made it dysfunctional. They also damaged fibre-optic power supplies and broke the biometric systems inside the room,” said the police complaint.

Police failing to act in India is nothing new. But their apparent failure to defend the students comes amid major nationwide protests against a new citizenship bill that critics say is anti-Muslim. At least 23 people have been killed. Tens of thousands have taken to the streets.

Narendra Modi’s rightwing Hindu nationalist government introduced the law last month. Students have largely led demonstrations against the bill with JNU – long associated with leftwing politics – at the forefront of anti-government activity.

While the political blame game between the ruling Bharatiya Janata party (BJP) and its rivals continues, JNU students who witnessed the violence say they can identify many of the assailants, despite the masked faces, as members of the Akhil Bharatiya Vidyarthi Parishad (ABVP), the student wing of the BJP.

The contrast between the police alacrity in charging Ghosh and their seeming inaction over the mob has come in for criticism. “How dare she stop a nationalist iron rod with her head?” asked the poet Javed Akhtar mockingly on Twitter.

The political analyst Arati Jerath called the violence “an unprecedented rampage by a mob at a university in the heart of the capital” and said someone had to be held accountable.

“It’s been a total dereliction of duty by the police. To charge Ghosh is laughable. But the JNU administration is equally responsible. The vice-chancellor, the proctor, they were all missing. It shows the institutional breakdown at JNU,” she said.

Delhi police are examining a claim by an unknown Hindu fringe group, the Hindu Raksha Dal, that it carried out the attack. “JNU is a hotbed of anti-national activities. We can’t tolerate this. We take full responsibility of the attack … and would like to say that they were our workers,” its leader, Pinky Chaudhary, told the ANI news agency.

BJP critics suggest the claim could be an attempt to deflect blame from the BJP’s student wing, in order to exonerate the governing party and its supporters.

Ten trade unions have called for a general strike on Wednesday to protest against what they called the government’s “anti-people” policies. They said they expected 250 million Indians to participate.

As condemnation of the attacks spread, more than 1,000 people held a vigil on Monday in Mumbai. Other demonstrations were held in Bengaluru, Kolkata and other major cities.

Modi’s BJP denied claims by the opposition Congress party that it was responsible, and in turn blamed left-leaning student groups which dominate the university’s politics.

The government has promised an investigation, while the home minister, Amit Shah – a close Modi aide – told university administrators and police to maintain order at the campus, which has been tense since protests in November over fee increases.

The Guardian


No doubt the Indian police are as disgraceful as their Hong Kong counterparts, if not more -- India is supposed to be a democratic country, FFS.

As I said before, it seems no country east / south of the EU is really decent. Anybody thinking India is entitled to replace China is delusional. Neither of them deserve prosperity, apparently.
#15058393
Oxymoron wrote:India is acting in its own best interest, its time for countries and people to stand up for their identity.


The identity of the Indian state is Gandhian democracy and secularism, not Hindutva.
#15058396
Donald wrote:The identity of the Indian state is Gandhian democracy and secularism, not Hindutva.


Afraid not. Gandhi longed for reconcilation between India, Bangaldesh and Parkistan, but the Indian leadership afterwards seemed not very keen on it. Instead, they went after Hindutva or Hindi domination from time to time.
#15058403
Patrickov wrote:Afraid not. Gandhi longed for reconcilation between India, Bangaldesh and Parkistan, but the Indian leadership afterwards seemed not very keen on it. Instead, they went after Hindutva or Hindi domination from time to time.


Gandhi desired reconciliation between Muslims and Hindus within the Indian democratic experiment (regardless of the fate of Pakistan) and Indian secularism since 1947 has accommodated this very well by avoiding the implementation of a unified civil code, which would empower Hindus at the expense of minorities. Also, I'm not sure how Gandhi could have longed for reconciliation between India, Bangladesh and Pakistan when Bangladesh was still part of the State of Pakistan at the time.
#15058409
Patrickov wrote:No doubt the Indian police are as disgraceful as their Hong Kong counterparts, if not more -- India is supposed to be a democratic country, FFS.

So is the USA, but that doesn't stop them from killing student demonstrators from time to time....

Image
As I said before, it seems no country east / south of the EU is really decent. Anybody thinking India is entitled to replace China is delusional. Neither of them deserve prosperity, apparently.

Prosperity is not something which one 'deserves'. It's not the economic equivalent of a gold star for good behaviour. Power and wealth are not 'earned' or 'deserved', they are taken. You seem to have a rather moralistic view of politics, Patrickov.
#15058425
Potemkin wrote:So is the USA, but that doesn't stop them from killing student demonstrators from time to time...

Image


If anything, I do agree that the Indian or Hong Kong police acted as if they were American police, but the problem is, in the United States the balance of power is very different, which makes the (already undefendable) American police attitude (even) less defendable if applied elsewhere.

Potemkin wrote:Prosperity is not something which one 'deserves'. It's not the economic equivalent of a gold star for good behaviour. Power and wealth are not 'earned' or 'deserved', they are taken. You seem to have a rather moralistic view of politics, Patrickov.


I understand that my ideals do not necessarily fit into what is currently happening.
#15058433
Patrickov wrote:If anything, I do agree that the Indian or Hong Kong police acted as if they were American police, but the problem is, in the United States the balance of power is very different, which makes the (already undefendable) American police attitude (even) less defendable if applied elsewhere.

Why would it be less defensible, Patrickov? They are, after all, using the same methods to achieve the same ends in both cases.

I understand that my ideals do not necessarily fit into what is currently happening.

Nor indeed do they necessarily fit into what has always happened throughout human history. When do you think that prosperous nations have ever 'deserved' their prosperity?
#15058443
Potemkin wrote:Why would it be less defensible, Patrickov? They are, after all, using the same methods to achieve the same ends in both cases.


First thing first, it is already not defendable in the United States.

The reason that applying it elsewhere is worse is simple. These countries' governments are even less legitimate because less people can hold them accountable.

Potemkin wrote:Nor indeed do they necessarily fit into what has always happened throughout human history. When do you think that prosperous nations have ever 'deserved' their prosperity?


History made the justice eventually. For example, the Spanish Empire didn't so they decline quite quickly. The British rule in many places did not justify this so those places gained independence, but I will argue that some other places used to be under British control indeed do.
#15058459
Patrickov wrote:First thing first, it is already not defendable in the United States.

The reason that applying it elsewhere is worse is simple. These countries' governments are even less legitimate because less people can hold them accountable.

Obtaining a democratic stamp of approval for immoral behaviour does not make it any less immoral. Hitler won elections in 1933. Does that make Nazism okay?

History made the justice eventually. For example, the Spanish Empire didn't so they decline quite quickly. The British rule in many places did not justify this so those places gained independence, but I will argue that some other places used to be under British control indeed do.

Remarkable. :eh:
#15058461
Potemkin wrote:Obtaining a democratic stamp of approval for immoral behaviour does not make it any less immoral. Hitler won elections in 1933. Does that make Nazism okay?


I have repeatedly stated that it is not defendable even in the United States or other Western countries, so there is no point in asking this question.

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