The American Civil War, day by day - Page 30 - Politics Forum.org | PoFo

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#15053686
I agree with Bruce Catton (at least, that’s the author I think said it)—slavery wasn’t the only issue where the North and South had differences, but it was the only one that the Deep South states cared about so strongly that they were willing to break up the Union over it. As Potemkin said, they said so themselves. It’s doubtful that a majority in the North would have been willing to go to war to free the slaves, but to prevent secession? That was another matter. And the Upper South slave states and Texas were either unwilling to go to war with the Deep South (North Carolina, Virginia, Tennessee (mostly), Arkansas) or divided on the question (Maryland, Kentucky, Missouri). So the primary cause of the war was secession, but the driving cause of secession was slavery. If the new Republican Party had been neutral on the question of slavery (fat chance!) there would have been no war.
#15053879
December 13, Friday

From the Cheat Mountain encampment of the Federal army in western Virginia, Brigadier General Milroy leads Federal troops against the Confederates at Camp Allegheny or Buffalo Mountain. After rather severe fighting the Federals fall back with 137 casualties, the Confederates suffering 146. Both armies retreat, the Federals to Cheat Mountain and the Confederates to Staunton in the Shenandoah. The attack validates Lee’s decision in late October to station the Confederate forces for the defense of Staunton and its railroads, but it is much too late to reduce the damage to Lee’s reputation caused by his failed campaigns in western Virginia.

Arguing with Confederate congressmen over the command in Missouri, President Davis writes, “I have, long since, learned to bear hasty censure in the hope that justice if tardy is sure, and in any event to find consolation in the assurance that all my ends have been my country’s.”
#15053890
Potemkin wrote:But that is, in effect, exactly what happened. The Southern States seceded over the issue of slavery. That's a fact. We know it's a fact because they said so themselves. So yeah, poor whites fought and died in the Civil War just so a few rich men could own slaves. The irony is that they would do the same thing all over again just so a few rich men could own Cadillacs. They have learned nothing from experience.

One of the first acts of the Bolshevik government was to put in an order for a set of Rolls Royce's for the central committee members. But the southerners were not just fighting for a few rich mens lifestyle. they were fighting an existential war for their culture. The Southerners wisely recognised that abolishing slavery was just the thin end of the wedge. The Blacks and their radical supporters would never be content with mere legal freedom. They would want the right to vote, the right to be in government, it would just go on and on.

Strangely almost exactly the same thing happened in Britain 80 years later. In the late 1940's, like France and the Soviet Union we used German slave labour. Strangely no leftie says we should feel any shame for this travesty under the Atlee government. I guess enslaving White people is just OK. Slavery of Black people 200 years ago was pure evil, but slavery of white people a 100 years ago is just fine. This is why I say nothing a cultural Marxist says can be taken in good faith. They don't really care about slavery. Anyway this couldn't go on, so the argument was that we have to replace German slaves with free Black people, to do all the menial low paid jobs. But of course five minutes after they arrived, lefties started complaining that Black people were doing all the menial work. But hang on that's what they were brought here to do.

The Southerners didn't want equality. But anti-White racist cultural Marxsts talk like this was some sort of unparalleled evil. Please show me you oh so intelligent, un-ignorant, wise lefties, what society in 1860 wanted equality. Perhaps I'm just stupid, but every society that I've looked at in 1860, the Zulu, the Ashante, the Sokoto, the Kingdom of Congo, China, not one of them wanted equality. I haven't been able to find a single society in 1860 where the dominant group was remotely interested in equality. And don't try and tell me that the majority of Northerners wanted equality either. Slavery abolition was easy for them. If the deal had been that all the freed slaves would move to the North, I think you would have found that Northerners would have suddenly have found slavery not so unacceptable after all.
#15054056
December 14, Saturday

Two weeks after his intervention resulting in the softening of the British response to the Trent Affair, His Royal Highness Prince Albert, deeply beloved consort of Queen Victoria, dies. England and the entire British Empire will go into mourning, and Queen Victoria will never quite recover.

Brigadier General H.H. Sibley assumes command of the Confederate forces on the upper Rio Grande and in New Mexico and Arizona territories.
#15054230
December 15, Sunday

Two Confederate blockade runners are captured, one off Cape Fear and the other off Cape Hatteras, continuing the slow but steady tightening of the Federal blockade.

There is a minor affair in Roane County and December 15-21 activity around Meadow Bluff, western Virginia.

For a couple of days there is patrolling on the lower Potomac in Virginia.
#15054459
December 16, Monday

A resolution is introduced in the US House of Representatives by Clement Vallandigham of Ohio, commending Captain Charles Wilkes for capturing Confederate commissioners Mason and Slidell. It is referred to committee.
#15054461
Doug64 wrote:December 16, Monday

A resolution is introduced in the US House of Representatives by Clement Vallandigham of Ohio, commending Captain Charles Wilkes for capturing Confederate commissioners Mason and Slidell. It is referred to committee.

Not the wisest thing in the world to do, considering the circumstances. Lol.
#15054694
December 17, Tuesday

T.J. “Stonewall” Jackson continues his operations along the Potomac near Harper’s Ferry, particularly against Dam No. 5 on the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal.

There is a skirmish on Chisolm’s Island, South Carolina, and Confederates evacuate Rockville, South Carolina, threatened by Federals from Hilton Head.

There is action at Rowlett’s Station near Woodsonville, Green River, Kentucky.

Federals sink several old hulks loaded with stones in Savannah Harbor in an effort to halt shipping.

British newspapers begin arriving in the United States with belligerent outcries over the apprehension of Mason and Slidell, causing consternation throughout the North and hope of recognition in the South.
#15054695
Potemkin wrote:Not the wisest thing in the world to do, considering the circumstances. Lol.

British newspapers begin arriving in the United States with belligerent outcries over the apprehension of Mason and Slidell, causing consternation throughout the North and hope of recognition in the South.

Yeah, the timing was just a little off. :D
#15054849
December 18, Wednesday

The British minister in Washington, Lord Lyon, receives his instructions from London, which includes a firm demand for the release of the captive Confederate commissioners, Mason and Slidell.

President Lincoln and his Cabinet discuss the Trent Affair informally.

Union scouting and reconnaissance is carried out at Blackwater Creek, Shawnee Mound or Milford, Missouri, and from Rolla toward Houston, Missouri; in Virginia toward Pohick Church; and from Somerset to Mill Springs, Kentucky.

In Washington President Lincoln talks with McClellan at the general’s home about future operations of the armies.
#15055058
December 19, Thursday

Lord Lyons, British minister to the United States, confers with Secretary of State Seward and acquaints him with the tenor and demands of the British government for the release of Southern commissioners Mason and Slidell. There are to be seven days to answer after the message is officially communicated.

There is a skirmish at Point of Rocks, Maryland, part of the nearly continuous action and probing along the Potomac.
#15055073
Doug64 wrote:Yeah, the timing was just a little off. :D

The War's start in 1861 and even more its end in 1865 was one of the greatest tragedy's in history. It wasn't for want of trying but the first reliable transatlantic telegraph wasn't laid till 1866. If the Americans hadn't been so selfish and could have just held back for a few more years, then we Europeans could have enjoyed following along in real time. Of course it still wasn't perfect in 1866 you couldn't transmit images and high definition video was right out, but still.
#15055102
Rich wrote:The War's start in 1861 and even more its end in 1865 was one of the greatest tragedy's in history. It wasn't for want of trying but the first reliable transatlantic telegraph wasn't laid till 1866. If the Americans hadn't been so selfish and could have just held back for a few more years, then we Europeans could have enjoyed following along in real time. Of course it still wasn't perfect in 1866 you couldn't transmit images and high definition video was right out, but still.

One of the main reasons the US lost the Vietnam War was precisely because the public back home could watch it unfolding in real time, including all the atrocities which accompany any armed conflict. No, it was better back in the old days, when America won its greatest victory in the War of 1812 several days after the war itself had officially ended. Lol. :lol:
#15055265
December 20, Friday

From Britain two troop vessels sail for Canada; bands play “Dixie” and “The British Grenadiers.” Their purpose—to have soldiers available in case of need arising out of the Trent Affair.

Sixteen old whaling vessels are sunk in the main ship channel off Charleston to impede blockade runners. This method, to be often applied, generally will have little effect.

There is a spirited fight at Dranesville, Virginia, just twelve miles down the Potomac from Ball’s Bluff, where the Federals get the better of it, inflicting nearly three times more casualties on the Confederates than their own losses of 66 men killed and wounded. Among the beaten Confederates is one who will rarely taste defeat: Brigadier General J.E.B. Stuart.

General McClellan, weakened by overwork, takes to his bed with typhoid fever; rumors will soon begin circulating that his life is in danger. The Radical Republicans on the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War—thinking McClellan to be insufficiently opposed to slavery because he sees restoration of the Union, not emancipation, as the main purpose of the war (as does Lincoln)—will take advantage of his illness to grill his subordinates for any evidence that can be used against him.

President Davis writes Sterling Price, Missouri commander, that “the welfare of Missouri is as dear to me as that of other States of the Confederacy,” in answer to charges that the Richmond government is neglecting the Trans-Mississippi, and Missouri in particular.
#15055468
December 21, Saturday

Lord Lyons, representing Britain, confers again with Secretary of State Seward over the demands for the release of Confederate commissioners Mason and Slidell.

Southern papers are enthusiastically commenting on possibilities of war between the United States and the British Empire.

For the Confederates, Brigadier General Henry A. Wise, after his difficulties in western Virginia, is assigned to duty in North Carolina, where it is thought a new threat will come.
#15055469
Potemkin wrote:One of the main reasons the US lost the Vietnam War was precisely because the public back home could watch it unfolding in real time, including all the atrocities which accompany any armed conflict.

One historian (I think) commented that in the Vietnam War the US generals measured victory by the number of body bags, while the US public measured defeat by the same yardstick.
#15055472
Doug64 wrote:One historian (I think) commented that in the Vietnam War the US generals measured victory by the number of body bags, while the US public measured defeat by the same yardstick.

Indeed. Modern communications are both a blessing and a curse for modern generals. One wonders if Rome would ever have won the Second Punic War if there had been front-line news bulletins in real time, complete with TV images beamed to every Roman household of the carnage suffered by Roman armies during the first few years of the war....
#15055615
December 22, Sunday

There is a light skirmish near New Market, Virginia, not far from Newport News.

Federal Major General Halleck cracks down on bridge burning and destruction of railroads and the telegraph in Missouri by ordering that anyone so caught will be immediately shot.
#15055617
Potemkin wrote:Indeed. Modern communications are both a blessing and a curse for modern generals. One wonders if Rome would ever have won the Second Punic War if there had been front-line news bulletins in real time, complete with TV images beamed to every Roman household of the carnage suffered by Roman armies during the first few years of the war....

Now, there I don’t think it would have made much of a difference. The Italian peninsula is constricted enough that news traveled fast even by foot and horse, and with Hannibal monster-stomping over one army after another the news was so bad (including perhaps the single bloodiest day in all human history) that I don’t think images on TV screens would have added much to the impact.
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