Cultural assimilation - Page 8 - Politics Forum.org | PoFo

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By QatzelOk
#14793358
Godstud wrote:I don't buy your "argument". I've read a great many history books, as well, and am interested in history, yet I don't hold the same biased views as you do.

Perhaps it's because of what you're reading as opposed to the real history that you don't particularly care for. You always seem to be making your own narrative.

Ending with an insult? :roll:

Sarah Palin, when asked which news sources she consults to create her worldview, answered "all of them." Now, we have a president who has "hunches" and always needs to be "the smartest one in the room."

North Americans are self-confident that the knowledge they have gained living in bungalows watching TV is enough to be wise and to contribute to political discussions that go way beyond the price of barbecues.

But really, most North Americans should stick to talking about the price of barbecues, sports cars, and how highways don't really contribute to sprawl. Our stupidity is really important to corporations.

And this fabricated "stupidity" is all that recent immigrants to the Anglosphere are expected to assimilate to.
#14793416
It's simply you understand and know what the country is about and you respect that country (well at least, it's people) or you don't.

You understand what the culture is about, what it symbolizes and means, or you don't. When it comes to countries, good governments come and go, but the people remain. I think in this regards if you really want to understand, get yourself dirty and rub shoulders with regular people on the street, don't be afraid to mingle. But of course, there's real culture and fabricated culture. Don't pretend, and don't listen or try to be like the pretenders. If you want to fit in badly enough you'll fit in.

Be honest sometimes even. America has always been a melting pot though, think about that. That's why IMHO it has the best culture. But culture is always real, it can never be fabricated; it's why art is so important and often the same reason why people don't respect art.
#14793418
QatzelOk wrote:Sarah Palin, when asked which news sources she consults to create her worldview, answered "all of them." Now, we have a president who has "hunches" and always needs to be "the smartest one in the room."

North Americans are self-confident that the knowledge they have gained living in bungalows watching TV is enough to be wise and to contribute to political discussions that go way beyond the price of barbecues.

But really, most North Americans should stick to talking about the price of barbecues, sports cars, and how highways don't really contribute to sprawl. Our stupidity is really important to corporations.

And this fabricated "stupidity" is all that recent immigrants to the Anglosphere are expected to assimilate to.


But America is and will always be a 'melting-pot' and that's what people forget. It's ever changing, there's no one sized image that fits America, and that's why anybody can be an American; but only if they really want to, only if they understand. The average working man, that's always been the face of real the real America.

Look at what young people are doing, they dye their hair weird colors, they wear weird clothes, but the trends usually kind of rotate because it's always still American in a way. They wear jeans, denim jackets, they get tattoos and play guitars. I dunno, that's how I see it. Being a little trashy, being a little weird, everything is up for question. Oh and I guess guns, guns are always a big part of it, unfortunately. I think sometimes people equate 'trashiness' and stupidity with what is instead genuine, real and authentic. They forget what real things look like. When you try to make things pristine, when you get lost in all these ideas of superiority, or constructed forms of beauty is when you lose real beauty. You can't fabricate culture.

I'm part Native American and part white; people take this in all kinds of ways, they try to deny it, they expect me to be one or another but it's what I really am. They just can't believe it I guess. That's one other reason why I always liked the melting pot, why I jumped into it before anyone else I knew did. I am the melting pot. I have dark, nearly black hair, my skin is kind of olive but I had blue eyes. And just in case people REALLY want to understand.

User avatar
By QatzelOk
#14794007
NightShadows wrote: America has always been a melting pot though...

Mercenaries from around the world are expected to lose their cultural values and "melt" into the nothingness of commercial propaganda.

This is why America often feels as grounded and human as a military barracks. Alienated ex-soldiers (and emotionally-damaged families) trying to forget all the damage they did to get rich quick (or get middle class quick).

Cultureless people who are trained, by commercial media, to suck resources out of the ground as quickly as possible without asking too many questions.

This isn't a culture. It's an enforced absence of one. All the real cultures were wiped out by mercenaries. And they will be wiped out again and again in order to melt everyone into dishwater bland nothingness.
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