Why is Russia so interested in Ukraine? - Page 2 - Politics Forum.org | PoFo

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#14538861
Most Chinese scholars today believe that Khrushchev was the first reformist in the Soviet Union
He was the third. The first of course was Lenin who brought in the NEP. We just don't know how things would have gone if Lenin had survived into the nineteen forties. The Second was Beria, who was a more radical reformer than Khrushchev. And that's just the number one leaders. Bukharin was a reformer for example. Also we don't really know how Trotsky's policies would have developed if Lenin had still been alive. He along with most of the leadership supported the NEP which was a major reform.
#14538863
It is definitely quite hilarious and ironic to hear the Chinese "Communist" Party suddenly start singing the praises about "moderate reformist minded" Soviet leadership. Since anyone with the most elementary grasp of historical facts knows full well it is exactly any attempts by the USSR government to slightly become less "totalitarian" which is exactly what created the "Sino-Soviet Split".
#14538888
Conscript wrote:Totalitarianism, whatever that means, was not the issue. It was his gestures towards peaceful coexistence and economic reform.

So, Marxism was the issue, and we're not talking 'slightly less'.


That is basically what I said...

Which is why the Chinese "Communist" Party attempts to rewrite history and act like somehow "all along" they were in support of said "reforms" is hilarious and deeply disturbing (if anyone actually believes them)
#14574210
I don't think Russia wants Ukraine as a buffer zone, not anymore. The arguments a lot of pro-Russian nationalists in Ukraine are making jive with the concept behind the annexation of Ukraine: the idea that Ukraine is in fact an integral part of Russia proper. If Putin had truly wanted Ukraine as a buffer zone, he would have simply reinstalled another Yanukovich. The annexation attempts make this conflict more about rebuilding and strengthening Russia. And if Putin succeeds in grabbing Ukraine, he'll have done just that. Ukraine is almost entirely covered with the most fertile soil in Europe. If Putin makes it part of Ruussia, he'll have control over the immense amount if grain Ukraine produces annually. This would provide Russia with a stable and steady source of income that would do a lot to ease Russian economic dependence on the faltering Gazprom
#14574793
Shalak22 wrote:I don't think Russia wants Ukraine as a buffer zone, not anymore. The arguments a lot of pro-Russian nationalists in Ukraine are making jive with the concept behind the annexation of Ukraine: the idea that Ukraine is in fact an integral part of Russia proper. If Putin had truly wanted Ukraine as a buffer zone, he would have simply reinstalled another Yanukovich. The annexation attempts make this conflict more about rebuilding and strengthening Russia. And if Putin succeeds in grabbing Ukraine, he'll have done just that. Ukraine is almost entirely covered with the most fertile soil in Europe. If Putin makes it part of Ruussia, he'll have control over the immense amount if grain Ukraine produces annually. This would provide Russia with a stable and steady source of income that would do a lot to ease Russian economic dependence on the faltering Gazprom


If by fertile, you mean radioactive? Please read your history books, most ukrainian products are banned in Europe for this reason.
#14575033
Ukraine is believed to be the birthplace of both Russia and Ukraine because the Kievan Rus' state's capital was in Kiev, which is often referred as a cradle of the Rus' civilisation. Russia and Ukraine still maintain close cultural and economic ties. For example, most Ukrainians speak both Ukrainian and Russian and millions of Ukrainians work in Russia. Both Ukrainians and Russians descended from the Rus people from Scandinavia who initially colonised Ukraine by the 10th century. The Rus people were a group Norsemen as the name Rus‍ ' is derived from an Old Norse term for "the men who row". Ukraine was an integral part of the Russian empire as well as the Soviet Union and losing Ukraine to the EU would have serious strategic implications for Russia.

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