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#15106782
James Redford wrote:
I see that reading isn't your strong suit. Perhaps you should inquire with your local elementary schools to see if they offer remedial reading courses to the general public.

Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels intended their system to be genocidally mass-murderous from the very start. For some details on that, see pp. 96-98 of my following article, particularly the footnotes therein:

* James Redford, "The Physics of God and the Quantum Gravity Theory of Everything", Social Science Research Network (SSRN), Sept. 10, 2012 (orig. pub. Dec. 19, 2011), 186 pp., doi:10.2139/ssrn.1974708, https://archive.org/download/ThePhysics ... of-God.pdf , https://purl.org/redford/physics-of-god .

From p. 97 of my foregoing article:

""
The genocidal goals of Bernard Shaw and H. G. Wells along with the eugenics movement which they were a part (mentioned in footnote 214 on p. 88) is an objective found in Marx and Engels’s own writings. In the Neue Rheinische Zeitung, a newspaper published by Marx, Engels wrote [125] that “All the other large and small tribes and peoples [making up the Austrian Empire, other than the Germans, Poles, and Hungarians] have as the first mission to perish in the revolutionary world storm.” (My translation.) Engels goes on to state that the Gaels, Bretons, Basques, and South Slavs are “Völkerabfälle” (human trash). (For additional writings by Marx and Engels along the foregoing lines, see Ref. 466.) ...

[Endnotes:]

[125] Friedrich Engels, “Der magyarische Kampf”, Neue Rheinische Zeitung, No. 194, Jan. 13, 1849, WebCite: 5xJ36MXNW [ https://webcitation.org/5xJ36MXNW ], <http://goo.gl/5YV3k>. 97

[466] George Watson, The Lost Literature of Socialism (Cambridge, UK: Lutterworth Press, 2nd ed., 2002), ISBN 0718892275, LCCN 2010285797. 97
""



No, reading *your material* isn't my strong suit.

I'm not concerned with any alleged 'genocidal intentions' on the part of Marx and Engels because *they're not around*. Certainly such, if even true -- and I'm *not* going to bother researching it -- is *irrelevant* in today's day and age, since that's beside the point, anyway.


James Redford wrote:
The horror-show that is socialism cannot be avoided, since the problem with socialism is government per se. Governments can only exist via the continual initiation of violence and threat thereof in order to maintain a coercive regional monopoly on ultimate control over the law (i.e., on the courts and police, etc.). This creates an unavoidable incentive-structure that rewards predation, since people are compelled by initiatory violence to be involved in the governmental system whether they want to be or not. That is, government is a species of rape: i.e., "The act of seizing and carrying away by force; violent seizure; robbery." (See Noah Porter [Ed.], Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary of the English Language [Springfield, Mass.: G. & C. Merriam Company, 1913].)

What makes socialism the most mass-murderous philosophy ever conceived is precisely because it puts all power into the most mass-murderous organization to ever exist, i.e., the state. The liberal solution is to disempower the state, rather than empowering it as the collectivists do.



You're ignoring the *politics* of the state, which, under *bourgeois* control is either nationalist / imperialist, or reformist. Under *workers* control it would expropriate the ruling class and annihilate the institution of private property, especially concerning the means of mass industrial production.


Components of Social Production

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#15107194
@ckaihatsu

Studying for the A+ exam I have coming up at the end of August, it's amazing how the technology for computer hardware has advanced. I have been reviewing the speeds of CPU processors, their clock multipliers, the speeds of the Static Random Access Memory found in CPU processors in the Level 1, Level 2 and Level 3 caches and the speeds of the Dynamic Random Access Memory outside of the CPU processors (which this type of memory is the main memory of a computer) and how they have advanced with the Double Data Rate Dynamic Random Access Memory (examples include DDR1, DDR2, DDR3 and DDR4 Dynamic Random Access Memory). Just amazing the amount of brain power and technical genius it takes to develop such wonderful technology. It's truly amazing.
#15107213
Politics_Observer wrote:
@ckaihatsu

Studying for the A+ exam I have coming up at the end of August, it's amazing how the technology for computer hardware has advanced. I have been reviewing the speeds of CPU processors, their clock multipliers, the speeds of the Static Random Access Memory found in CPU processors in the Level 1, Level 2 and Level 3 caches and the speeds of the Dynamic Random Access Memory outside of the CPU processors (which this type of memory is the main memory of a computer) and how they have advanced with the Double Data Rate Dynamic Random Access Memory (examples include DDR1, DDR2, DDR3 and DDR4 Dynamic Random Access Memory). Just amazing the amount of brain power and technical genius it takes to develop such wonderful technology. It's truly amazing.



Awesome-sauce, brah.
#15110543
@ckaihatsu

When looking to wipe magnetic hard drives (I wouldn't use this tool for SSD drives given that my understanding these secure delete tools work with magnetic hard disk drive platters rather than the flash memory in SSD drives) you can use secure delete tools to completely wipe your hard disk drive before selling your old computer or giving it away. It's not a guarantee all your data will be completely wiped away from digital forensic tools but it's more likely the will be.

It will be much more difficult for people with digital forensic tools to recover deleted files on your hard disk drive when you use the secure delete tools to wipe your hard drive. Here is a link that explains some of the tools that come with secure-delete that you can install on your Linux box. This is handy for me to wipe my hard drives on hold hardware that way I can convert them to Linux desktop computers to give to others to use.

https://www.howtogeek.com/425232/how-to ... -on-linux/

I got Ubuntu 20.04 the latest LTS version of Ubuntu up and going. Got my secondary external SSD drive rigged up to automount on tthe ext4 partition I created on it from my /etc/fstab file that way I can back my Linux box up on an external SSD drive on that specific partition of the external SSD drive. I also created an NTFS partition to back up my Windows 10 partition on the same hard drive. Just have it backed up on a second different partition formatted using NTFS. Getting Samba network shares to automount from the /etc/fstab file is more of a pain in the ass in Ubuntu 20.04 than it was in 18.04 though.

I got it working but it's not as secure as I would like it to be and 18.04 I can very securely mount network shares without any problem. Others Linux users have experienced similar problems when it comes to using a credentials file that is hidden and guarded with heavy permissions using 20.04. Very annoying that 20.04 is uncooperative when using a credential files that is hidden and heavily guarded with tight permissions. And it's NOT my permissions settings that is preventing the auto mounting of my network shares from my /etc/fstab file that is the problem. Something else is causing the problem.

I am using the more secure SMB (Server Message Block) protocol 3.0 mounting my network shares but I want to use the more secure method of using a credential file that is hidden away with tight permissions on it like I did with 18.04.

I have been hammering on this problem for the past two days in between my school work and I think this might be because 20.04 might have a different way of doing it than 18.04 or maybe it's a possible bug that needs patching. Not sure. My auto mounts and preventing other partitions from auto mounting on boot up using the /etc/fstab file with 20.04 works just fine when using partitioned out SSD or other mass storage devices.
Last edited by Politics_Observer on 30 Jul 2020 07:15, edited 1 time in total.
#15110544
There's the distro that kills your graphics card. Like, I'm not even attempting to play a game and I can hear my fan roaring. Wtf :eek:

There's the distro full of hacking tools that you're never going to learn how to use. Supposedly helps with your security or something?

There's Ubuntu, the one that gets over-hyped.

There's Mint, the one that actually works fairly well out of the box.

There, I just saved you a lot of time.
#15110545
@Wulfschilde

Ubuntu 18.04 works fine out of the box. Kali Linux is the hacking distribution and is pretty cool to use. I have used that extensively in my Ethical Hacking class. I downloaded and installed Metasploitable as a guest operating system as well to practice hacking as part of my Ethical Hacking class (it's legal to do that as you are simply hacking into a virtual machine running off your own computer). You can do some cool stuff with Kali Linux. It's pretty awesome! You have to know how to use those tools though but if you do, it's awesome!

I have downloaded some of the Kali Linux tools onto my prior 18.04 box and used those tools not to hack my brother in law's home network but to trouble shoot it using Nmap. Used Nmap to conduct a ping sweep to locate the IP address of a second router he had going in his home network that his cable company installed but didn't tell him (or didn't know themselves) what the IP address to that second router was. So, I did a ping sweep of his entire network to locate and get into the settings of his second router and make it more secure. You can do port scans and ping sweeps using nmap. Nmap is an excellent tool for troubleshooting networks. Though port scanning is not a tool that is used for troubleshooting networks. It's more of a hacker tool for reconnaissance and finding out more specific details about a computer at a specific IP address and what vulnerabilities it possibly has. Port scanning is detectable though and system administrators get pissed about somebody port scanning some of the systems in their networks.
Last edited by Politics_Observer on 30 Jul 2020 07:34, edited 3 times in total.
#15110550
Politics_Observer wrote:@Wulfschilde

I had to learn the tools otherwise I got a failing grade from my professor. That was a tough class too.

I can actually program :D Took a class run by a guy who told us on day 1 that he didn't care to teach and was just into his research. I was one of the only people who passed.

To be honest, something that probably helped me to pass was that I "hacked" all of the homework answers from a previous semester. He hadn't secured them at all. Although the questions were not the same, it was still a helpful reference and caused me to only have a few all-nighters for that class instead of many, in which case I might have run out of energy and failed.

Man that class was dramatic. There were people literally crying during the final exam. I think it was the most extreme I had ever seen such a thing be. The guy would just lecture on random stuff and then expect us to be able to make all of these complex programs afterwards...
#15110567
@Wulfschilde

Yup, I have seen classes like that in my lifetime. It sucks too.

@ckaihatsu

I would stay away from Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. It's buggy right now. I have read on the internet that people have also had some trouble with 20.04 being buggy. I am reverting back to 18.04 LTS given it's not as buggy and more stable than 20.04 LTS. Support for 18.04 LTS will last at least until April 2023. I read somewhere that Ubuntu is offering 10 year support now on their operating systems though it's not clear if that 10 year support is free like their 5 year support. I'll switch back to Ubuntu 20.04 as soon as more updates come out on it that fixes some of it's bugginess.
#15110622
Politics_Observer wrote:
@ckaihatsu

When looking to wipe magnetic hard drives (I wouldn't use this tool for SSD drives given that my understanding these secure delete tools work with magnetic hard disk drive platters rather than the flash memory in SSD drives) you can use secure delete tools to completely wipe your hard disk drive before selling your old computer or giving it away. It's not a guarantee all your data will be completely wiped away from digital forensic tools but it's more likely the will be.

It will be much more difficult for people with digital forensic tools to recover deleted files on your hard disk drive when you use the secure delete tools to wipe your hard drive. Here is a link that explains some of the tools that come with secure-delete that you can install on your Linux box. This is handy for me to wipe my hard drives on hold hardware that way I can convert them to Linux desktop computers to give to others to use.

https://www.howtogeek.com/425232/how-to ... -on-linux/

I got Ubuntu 20.04 the latest LTS version of Ubuntu up and going. Got my secondary external SSD drive rigged up to automount on tthe ext4 partition I created on it from my /etc/fstab file that way I can back my Linux box up on an external SSD drive on that specific partition of the external SSD drive. I also created an NTFS partition to back up my Windows 10 partition on the same hard drive. Just have it backed up on a second different partition formatted using NTFS. Getting Samba network shares to automount from the /etc/fstab file is more of a pain in the ass in Ubuntu 20.04 than it was in 18.04 though.

I got it working but it's not as secure as I would like it to be and 18.04 I can very securely mount network shares without any problem. Others Linux users have experienced similar problems when it comes to using a credentials file that is hidden and guarded with heavy permissions using 20.04. Very annoying that 20.04 is uncooperative when using a credential files that is hidden and heavily guarded with tight permissions. And it's NOT my permissions settings that is preventing the auto mounting of my network shares from my /etc/fstab file that is the problem. Something else is causing the problem.

I am using the more secure SMB (Server Message Block) protocol 3.0 mounting my network shares but I want to use the more secure method of using a credential file that is hidden away with tight permissions on it like I did with 18.04.

I have been hammering on this problem for the past two days in between my school work and I think this might be because 20.04 might have a different way of doing it than 18.04 or maybe it's a possible bug that needs patching. Not sure. My auto mounts and preventing other partitions from auto mounting on boot up using the /etc/fstab file with 20.04 works just fine when using partitioned out SSD or other mass storage devices.



Politics_Observer wrote:
@Wulfschilde

Yup, I have seen classes like that in my lifetime. It sucks too.

@ckaihatsu

I would stay away from Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. It's buggy right now. I have read on the internet that people have also had some trouble with 20.04 being buggy. I am reverting back to 18.04 LTS given it's not as buggy and more stable than 20.04 LTS. Support for 18.04 LTS will last at least until April 2023. I read somewhere that Ubuntu is offering 10 year support now on their operating systems though it's not clear if that 10 year support is free like their 5 year support. I'll switch back to Ubuntu 20.04 as soon as more updates come out on it that fixes some of it's bugginess.



Yeah, I don't know if it's the version-number, per se, because I've had glitchy variabilities like these that you're describing throughout the march of incremental version updates. Also I saw some *praises* for 20.04 on YouTube, for whatever that's worth, though I didn't watch them.

I've had problems with fstab volume automounting in the past, and at some point it's just not worth the continued efforts to get everything working perfectly, even though we know it *should* work that way.

I think we're going through a particularly major historical technological transition right now, since the past era of incremental technological developments is now culminating in a very good form factor, the tablet, which can arguably replace the laptop form factor, and *soon*, if not immediately. Also everything is becoming low-wattage which means it's easier than ever to find (free, solar) power for our devices, and they won't even run that hot under heavy loads, like with the 3D graphics rendering that I do.
#15110630
I'll add that we have e-ink right around the corner, so fairly soon we should see high-quality, full-color e-ink displays on all typical computing devices, and not just smartphones, as is presently the case. (E-ink allows one to be on a computer in the *sunlight*, since the display is *passive*.) I've already seen some surprisingly good framerates on color e-ink smartphones.
#15110683
@ckaihatsu

I've already reverted back to Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and edited my /etc/fstab file and everything auto-mounts securely using SMB protocol 3.0 and a tightly privileged hidden credentials file for my network shares. I usually hide my credentials file for network share automounts in a hidden directory as well as in a hidden file and set the owner and group of the hidden directory and hidden file as root. I then follow up and only grant the user root only read privileges while all other group and other privileges are completely revoked. This makes the credentials file for my Samba network shares very secure because you are not putting the user name and password in the /etc/fstab itself where they could be intercepted and read by a hacker.

I had issues with 20.04 LTS when I first try to upgrade to it from 18.04 LTS and then when that proved unsuccessful, I did a clean install with 20.04 LTS replacing 18.04 LTS. However, network shares auto mount proved troublesome when using a tightly privileged hidden credentials file to where I couldn't even use credentials file to get the network shares to auto mount which is a bad idea to not be using a tightly privileged hidden credentials file for auto mounting Samba shares.

Afterwards, some parts of 20.04 LTS just stopped working and I got about 8 gigs of RAM and Intel i7 quad core processor so I don't think it was a hardware issue that caused it to stop working. I have read you a need a minimum of 4 Gigs of RAM to run the 20.04 LTS operating system unlike 18.04 LTS 2 gigs of RAM.

Still, I don't think the issue was hardware related but bugs in the code of 20.04 LTS that need to be patched up. But now that I reverted back to 18.04 LTS everything is smooth sailing. I think as it stands right now given that 18.04 LTS will be supported at least until 2023, people are better off going with or simply sticking with 18.04 LTS rather than using 20.04 LTS in my experience. I personally do not give 20.04 LTS a good review. I would be glad to change it when it some of the bugs the operating system seems to have gets patched up.

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