The Ten Commandments For Honorable Service As A Computer Professional - Politics Forum.org | PoFo

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#15005806
This is required of every well educated computer professional who is knowledgeable in his or her field and to be regarded as honorable as written and quoted below by the Computer Ethics Institute:

Written by the Computer Ethics Institute
by the Computer Ethics Institute

" 1) Thou shalt not use a computer to harm other people.
2) Thou shalt not interfere with other people's computer work.
3) Thou shalt not snoop around in other people's computer files.
4) Thou shalt not use a computer to steal.
5) Thou shalt not use a computer to bear false witness.
6) Thou shalt not copy or use proprietary software for which you have not paid.
7) Thou shalt not use other people's computer resources without authorization or proper compensation.
8 ) Thou shalt not appropriate other people's intellectual output.
9) Thou shalt think about the social consequences of the program you are writing or the system you are designing.
10) Thou shalt always use a computer in ways that ensure consideration and respect for your fellow humans."

http://cpsr.org/issues/ethics/cei/

References-

Computer Professionals for Social Responsibility. "The Ten Commandments of Computer Ethics." CPSR - Computer Professionals for Social Responsibility, 1 Sept. 2011, cpsr.org/issues/ethics/cei/. Accessed 19 May 2019.
#15005811
B0ycey wrote:Thou must return to Basic. :p


That's hilarious! ha ha ha ha! :lol:

I have written some pretty good Python scripts using the Geany editor on my Linux Ubuntu partition. I have taken some of those scripts and turned them into commands that I can execute on my Bash shell terminal. Python is excellent for writing shell scripts. I have a triple boot laptop with Windows 10 Professional, Debian based Linux Ubuntu and Red Hat based Linux Centos 7. I primarily use my Linux Ubuntu partition for just about everything and rarely ever use Windows 10 except on rare occassion to test out my Lubuntu Samba server. I took my wife's old laptop computer she no longer uses and wiped out her hard drive and installed the Lightweight Linux Lubuntu on it and turned it into a Samba and SSH server. I backup files on that server plus I have tons music on the Samba server so that others in my household can access it using Windows 10 on their laptops when they want to. I use SFTP with the SSH server when I am away from home and I need to send the server some backup files.
#15005976
I like to keep windows on a separate partition. I've just got a new laptop. I've got Windows 10 on the SATA, Samsung 860 and my Linux distros, for real work, on the NVMe Samsung 970: Kubuntu 19.04, Kubuntu 18.04 and Opensuse Tumbleweed. I occasionally play around with Arch. I have a common data partiion accesable to all Linux distros and I can use Rsync to synchronise between my data partition on my laptop and my desktop.
#15006011
@Rich

Rich wrote:I like to keep windows on a separate partition. I've just got a new laptop. I've got Windows 10 on the SATA, Samsung 860 and my Linux distros, for real work, on the NVMe Samsung 970: Kubuntu 19.04, Kubuntu 18.04 and Opensuse Tumbleweed. I occasionally play around with Arch. I have a common data partiion accesable to all Linux distros and I can use Rsync to synchronise between my data partition on my laptop and my desktop.


It's a good idea to install just one operating system on a computer. I have the triple boot because I am taking classes and it's easier for me to have those three operating systems natively installed on separate partitions. I run KVM virtual machines on the Linux partitions and VMWare on the Windows partition when my school work calls for it (I am an older fellow returning back to school as a student taking classes online). It's good to know how to install various different operating systems on different partitions, however, from a security standpoint, you are better off not having a multi-book computer with Windows as one of the operating systems.

Kubuntu 18.04, i think, is an excellent flavor of of Ubuntu to use (at least that's my opinion). I installed Opensuse as part of school work but I never used it much and haven't played around or used Arch Linux. I'll tell you a tough course to take, but it's well worth taking it, TCP/IP. Dude! Tough course man! I am taking it right now.

i had good background preparation for it with solid understanding in the fundamentals of networking, the OSI model, base 2 binary code and base 16 hexadecimals, but even with good background preparation, TCP/IP is no easy course. I can see my computer and networking skills improve tremendously though as I progress through the course despite the very technical, challenging nature of it.
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