I Reject, I Affirm. ''Raising the Black Flag'' in an Age of Devilry. - Page 66 - Politics Forum.org | PoFo

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#15247766
annatar1914 wrote:There is a political aspect to what St. Paul called " the Mystery of Iniquity ".

Since Satan's kingdom on Earth is not in fact divided, all evil, all sin an all death, all ignorance and errors, tend to the building up of that infernal kingdom, the sinful structures of " spiritual wickedness in high places " .

So in short the political aspect of the building up of evil involves the mechanisms by which say, moral rot from certain people in country "A" can effect the strength of a popular false religion in country " B" perhaps. Or similar connections.

And yet since only a few perceptive persons can even see even a limited amount of such connections, the best policy from a concerned Orthodox Christian faced with the inevitable ineptitude and clumsy flailing about of confronting collective evil, is the striving for personal holiness. And collectively, an awareness of exactly what organized evil must be fought, when and how.

The important thing to remember in that latter societal conflict is that the organized evil will likely be presented as something good, because (given the nature of evil as a privation or distortion of something good) it will be for the most part exactly that. It will resemble the Truth in clever ways, but contain absurdities and facile lies. As an Orthodox Christian, I see this Organized Evil as a false religion apeing the true one, an entire way of life resembling almost as insult the true way of life, integral and complete.


You could even say that this is our role in a time like this... To not wield political power, but to wield power just in our own personal sphere, not even in terms of literally having followers, no, never like that, but only in terms of being there for a few different people to point like arrows to the truth.

There is no magical formula of words that changes someone's will and makes them repent. They have free will.

Even Jesus Christ, in the flesh, speaking the divine words of the Gospel, working miracles, could not get everyone to repent and follow Him. How can we expect to get a single person to do so through ourselves alone..?

It's a time for humility for us.

May my posting expereince on PoFo just teach me how to be less of a prideful loser! :p
#15248267
Verv wrote:You could even say that this is our role in a time like this... To not wield political power, but to wield power just in our own personal sphere, not even in terms of literally having followers, no, never like that, but only in terms of being there for a few different people to point like arrows to the truth.

There is no magical formula of words that changes someone's will and makes them repent. They have free will.

Even Jesus Christ, in the flesh, speaking the divine words of the Gospel, working miracles, could not get everyone to repent and follow Him. How can we expect to get a single person to do so through ourselves alone..?

It's a time for humility for us.

May my posting expereince on PoFo just teach me how to be less of a prideful loser! :p


@Verv , well said, my friend.

It can't be too hard to understand the " signs of the times", even if we are not as far towards the Eschaton as some might think.

I came across the story of king Alexander Mollosus of Epirus earlier today, he being the maternal uncle of both Alexander the Great and King Phyrrus of Epirus. Mollosus said of his nephew that he " warred against women " in the East, while he warred against real men in Italy of his day.

It's related to your commentary Verv. And to my reflection on " Barbarism". You see, we live in a very degenerate period of high civilization, and its almost impossible to have much more than a relatively small remnant to maintain Christianity with. The Church Fathers lived in a similar era of decadence i note...

Would a younger if perhaps more virile and ruder society be a stronger foundation for the true Christianity? I think so.
#15248541
This is true - I think brutal people are more humble because they understand the fragility of life, and its potential pointlessness, and thus they are open to moral answers and to Faith... But the characteristic of our society is that everyone has answers. So much so, with everyone being treated like a qualified expert, that we end up passing over the truth constantly, thinking ourselves the ultimate authorities.

But we are not.

BTW... Even if we are to be supporters of democratic and non-monarchist societies... I still admire the way that Mencken criticizes them.

At the root of Christianity should be a certain contempt for anything that is worldly. And so while a system might be in place that is even functioning well, worshiping the system, or believing it as something that will build some utopia or some such, is likewise very flawed.

Christians might have to be "political atheists" to a good degree.
#15248773
Verv wrote:This is true - I think brutal people are more humble because they understand the fragility of life, and its potential pointlessness, and thus they are open to moral answers and to Faith... But the characteristic of our society is that everyone has answers. So much so, with everyone being treated like a qualified expert, that we end up passing over the truth constantly, thinking ourselves the ultimate authorities.

But we are not.

BTW... Even if we are to be supporters of democratic and non-monarchist societies... I still admire the way that Mencken criticizes them.

At the root of Christianity should be a certain contempt for anything that is worldly. And so while a system might be in place that is even functioning well, worshiping the system, or believing it as something that will build some utopia or some such, is likewise very flawed.

Christians might have to be "political atheists" to a good degree.


@Verv :

I cannot disagree at all my friend. I will say that my political atheism is of a sort that what I see coming is a Dark Age , at least politically speaking. America will be run by a wealthy political dynasty, for profit, that will limit all real power to their family and those of their henchmen. Bonapartism/Paternalism. Opinions and political philosophies won't matter, to them or to the masses. But the forms will remain of the old republicanism. However to call it a Monarchy would be an insult to Royalty everywhere. At least now

It's just getting to the transitional stage now I believe, a time soon coming of billionaire warlords and private military contractors/mercenaries coming to the forefront, and of the collapse of the Westphalian nation State. Of city states and empires, of clans and tribes, ethno nationalism and religious revival. Monarchy as a deeper element of human government could revive and even dominate again, possibly.

We who came of age in the previous era are going to have to adapt politically as Christians, to navigate the return of the pre modern era I believe is already in formation.

Thinking maybe that the end of the Second Elizabethan era and the Coronation of King Charles III will be more pregnant with meaning than we realize.
#15249464
I think that it is probably too much to ask greatness of persons who are most likely transitory figures, even if possibly necessary ones. Later eras may wonder what the fuss was all about.

But on the other hand, perhaps there is a slight intuition among opponents of these people that they somewhat resemble (if only in a funhouse mirror way) other persons or rather archetypes which are truly more the horror and aberration to their political opponents.

Thus for one example, President Trump doesn't offend American Liberals so much as his caricature of a resemblance to what they imagine an reactionary American Royal Monarchy would look like. Other examples could be thought of to be sure. Such symbols and archetypes are like garlic to a vampire, or crosses and holy water. Hmm, themselves abhorrent to these people come to think of it.

Again, these individuals that find the transitional persons so disgusting, and perhaps quite rightly, would really have difficulty with real Monarchs of a bygone age, or of an age that is coming.
#15249474
annatar1914 wrote:I think that it is probably too much to ask greatness of persons who are most likely transitory figures, even if possibly necessary ones. Later eras may wonder what the fuss was all about.

But on the other hand, perhaps there is a slight intuition among opponents of these people that they somewhat resemble (if only in a funhouse mirror way) other persons or rather archetypes which are truly more the horror and aberration to their political opponents.

Thus for one example, President Trump doesn't offend American Liberals so much as his caricature of a resemblance to what they imagine an reactionary American Royal Monarchy would look like. Other examples could be thought of to be sure. Such symbols and archetypes are like garlic to a vampire, or crosses and holy water. Hmm, themselves abhorrent to these people come to think of it.

Again, these individuals that find the transitional persons so disgusting, and perhaps quite rightly, would really have difficulty with real Monarchs of a bygone age, or of an age that is coming.

Indeed. And there is a clear historical example of this - the transition from the Roman Republic to the Roman Empire. Many of the Roman elite could never adjust to the new dispensation for at least a couple of generations. This was one of, if not the most important reason why the rule of the first few emperors was so blood-soaked. Large sections of the Roman aristocracy kept conspiring against them.

There’s no reason to think the same thing wouldn’t happen in America after the fall of the Republic….
#15249521
Potemkin wrote:Indeed. And there is a clear historical example of this - the transition from the Roman Republic to the Roman Empire. Many of the Roman elite could never adjust to the new dispensation for at least a couple of generations. This was one of, if not the most important reason why the rule of the first few emperors was so blood-soaked. Large sections of the Roman aristocracy kept conspiring against them.

There’s no reason to think the same thing wouldn’t happen in America after the fall of the Republic….


@Potemkin :

One thing that strikes me about Emperors and Oligarchs is that most of what we Moderns " know" about certain Roman Emperors comes from their enemies. Like Suetonius and his " lives of the Caesars", for example.

I don't doubt that people can sometimes be bad but I do doubt the more crazy stories, such as Caligula making his horse Consul.
#15249522
annatar1914 wrote:@Potemkin :

One thing that strikes me about Emperors and Oligarchs is that most of what we Moderns " know" about certain Roman Emperors comes from their enemies. Like Suetonius and his " lives of the Caesars", for example.

I don't doubt that people can sometimes be bad but I do doubt the more crazy stories, such as Caligula making his horse Consul.

It’s not impossible; after all, Suetonius couldn’t just make shit up. But he could and did put his own ‘spin’ on those events. Instead of being merely an act of lunacy, Caligula may have been trying to pointedly and publicly insult and humiliate the Senate and the aristocracy generally. “My horse would make a better Consul than one of you lot!” sort of thing. When reading Suetonius, we must always bear in mind the animosity between the senatorial class and the first emperors. They mutually loathed, feared and hated each other, with good reason.
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