How many delegates do Clinton and Obama have? Media Dispari - Politics Forum.org | PoFo

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#1448929
Umm . . . CNN says:

Hillary Clinton: 1100
Barack Obama: 1039

MSNBC says:

Hillary Clinton: 855
Barack Obama: 861

Fox says:

Hillary: 1055
Obama: 998

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What I do not understand is, if Obama won all three competing states :?: today and he was in the lead; why is Hillary in the lead everywhere?

What are you guys numbers?

What's going on?!?
User avatar
By Nets
#1448933
When was Obama in the lead? Remember, on the Democratic side delegates are meted out proportionally. Clinton won the big states, Obama lots of smaller ones, they were about tied. Today, Obama won pluralities in all three states but not all the delegates. Hence, Clinton is still in the lead. What's the problem?
By Zyx
#1448934
Hillary Clinton: 855
Barack Obama: 861

This was the scoring since Saturday, no?
User avatar
By Maxim Litvinov
#1448948
I think it depends (a) on estimates congressional district by congressional district, but more importantly (b) on whether or not 'super' delegates are included.

The total number of delegates is made up of 'super delegates' - which are top Democrats in each state that automatically get a vote regardless of the primary result - and delegates that are elected in each state according to the primary results.

There are about 300 super delegates, and they are split about 190/100 in favour of Hillary Clinton. Therefore, before even the first primary Clinton was nominally about 90 delegates in front of Obama.

Therefore, you could have a count of one of three things.
[1] Just delegates elected in the primaries process - which would give Obama an ever-so-slight lead now.
[2] Delegates elected in the primaries + the super delegates from the states that have held their primaries - which would give Hillary a slight lead.
[3] All delegates whose votes are considered known already - ie. super delegates from all states + delegates elected in primaries - which would give Hillary a slightly larger lead.

The biggest numbers are probably the easiest and best to follow, but you have to keep in mind that they don't simply reflect voting in the primaries but rather the number of delegates Clinton leads by.

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