The American Civil War, day by day - Page 16 - Politics Forum.org | PoFo

Wandering the information superhighway, he came upon the last refuge of civilization, PoFo, the only forum on the internet ...

Those who do not remember the past are condemned to relive it. Note: nostalgia *is* allowed.
Forum rules: No one line posts please.
#15000498
April 22, Monday

Governor H.M. Rector of Arkansas turns down the Federal requisition for troops, stating their purpose is “to subjugate the Southern States.”

State troops of North Carolina seize the US Arsenal at Fayetteville.

Florida ratifies the Confederate Constitution, but has been part of the new nation since January.

President Davis tells Governor Letcher of Virginia that more troops are on the way and urges him to “sustain Baltimore if practicable.” President Lincoln is still sorely concerned over the Baltimore situation and tells a peace-seeking committee from Baltimore YMCA, “You express great horror of bloodshed, and yet would not lay a straw in the way of those who are organizing in Virginia and elsewhere to capture this city.” He says he has no desire to invade the South but he must defend the capital, and adds, “Keep your rowdies in Baltimore, and there will be no bloodshed.” Troops now have to march across Maryland.

The commandant of the Washington Navy Yard, Captain Franklin Buchanan, resigns to go South and is succeeded by Commander John A. Dahlgren.

The steamer Boston brings the Seventh New York to Annapolis.

Governor Hicks of Maryland urges the President to withdraw troops from Maryland and advocates cessation of hostilities with arbitrament by Lord Lyons, the British minister. Secretary of State Seward turns down these suggestions.

Late at night Illinois troops arrive to garrison Cairo, Illinois, which points like a sword at the heart of the South from its position at the junction of the Mississippi and Ohio rivers.

In Richmond Robert E. Lee is nominated by the governor and confirmed by the State Convention as commander of the forces of Virginia.
#15000650
April 23, Tuesday

Arkansas troops seize Fort Smith, an important frontier post.

R.E. Lee, now a major general of Virginia, is formally assigned to command the forces of the state.

USS Pawnee arrives in Washington from Norfolk, strengthening the defenses of the Federal Capital.

In Montgomery President Davis writes Governor Claiborne Jackson of Missouri that he has received his envoys and that the Confederacy will aid the Missouri secessionists in attacking the St. Louis Arsenal.

John Bell of Tennessee, lately Constitutional Union candidate for President, tells a Nashville meeting that he is opposed to the attempted subjugation of the South. Meanwhile, political meetings for various causes continue in both countries.

Troops, both CSA and USA, are moving toward Virginia and Washington. Of the Federal forces, President Lincoln exclaims, “Why don’t they come! Why don’t they come!”

US officers at San Antonio, Texas, are captured as prisoners of war.
#15000872
April 24, Wednesday

“I don’t believe there is any North. The Seventh Regiment is a myth.... You are the only Northern realities.” So says Lincoln to troops in Washington. There is real fear now in the capital of attack from land, or possibly from the Potomac. The pressure on the Federal President is showing. To Maryland political leader Reverdy Johnson, he writes that the sole purpose of bringing troops to Washington is defensive and not to invade Virginia, except to repel attack: “I do not mean to let them invade us without striking back.”

Governor Beriah Magoffin of Kentucky calls for the state to place itself in a state of defense and convenes the legislature for May 5.
#15001047
April 25, Thursday

US Senator Stephen A. Douglas addresses the Illinois legislature at Springfield, emotionally calling for support of the Union. The war is “in defense of those great rights of freedom of trade, commerce and intercourse from the center to the circumference of our great continent.” Sadly, he adds, “I believe in my conscience that it is a duty we owe ourselves, and our children, and our God, to protect this Government and the flag from every assailant, be he who he may.”

Meanwhile, more US troops surrender, this time at Saluria, Texas.

In Washington, President Lincoln reviews the newly arrived Seventh New York, and wonders whether troops should not prevent the Maryland legislature from assembling to take action on secession. He concludes that he has no power to interfere.

Captain James H. Stokes of Chicago, told to get arms for Illinois troops from the St. Louis Arsenal, secretly takes a steamer from Alton and late at night lands at the arsenal wharf. He and his men remove ten thousand muskets and other arms from under the noses of the pro-secessionist elements in St. Louis and return safely to Alton, where they are unloaded Friday morning, April 26.

USS Constitution leaves the Chesapeake for New York and Newport, Rhode Island, under tow. The historic vessel will remain at Newport at the transferred US Naval Academy. It is not considered safe to leave the Naval Academy at Annapolis, and the grounds have been turned into an army camp.

Brigadier General Edwin V. Sumner assumes command of the US Army Department of the Pacific, relieving Albert Sidney Johnston.
#15001155
April 26, Friday

Governor Joseph Brown of Georgia issues an order for repudiation by citizens of all debts owed Northerners.

Major General Joseph E. Johnston of the Virginia Volunteers is assigned to command state forces in and around Richmond.

Governor John W. Ellis of North Carolina calls a special session of the General Assembly and deprecates President Lincoln’s call for troops.

The Navy Department in Washington is rushing to implement the blockade, sending out what vessels it has and purchasing mercantile steamers.

The zeal of the people on both sides is unabated, with men and money pouring in. women make shirts, blankets, even coats and pants for the new soldiers. Communities pledge to take care of the families of soldiers while they are gone, for most believe it cannot be for long.
#15001352
April 27, Saturday

The Federal blockade is extended to the coasts of Virginia and North Carolina by proclamation of President Lincoln. He also suspends the privilege of the writ of habeas corpus, for reasons of public safety, along a line from Philadelphia to Washington, upon the discretion of General Scott. Several Federal command changes are made, with Major General Patterson commanding the Department of Pennsylvania, Brigadier General B.F. Butler the Department of Annapolis, and Colonel Joseph K.F. Mansfield the Department of Washington.

On the Confederate side Colonel Thomas Jonathan Jackson is officially assigned to command Virginia troops around Harper’s Ferry. The Virginia Convention invites the Confederate government to make Richmond the nation’s seat of government.

With the arrival of the Seventh New York, followed by other regiments, the pressure in Washington is slowly relieved and the city no longer feels isolated and besieged. Ever since the Baltimore riots the tension has been high, but now it subsides.

A number of government employees are resigning and leaving for the South, as are military men from posts all over the country.

Maryland seems to be turning toward the Union, and the action of the special session of the state assembly is awaited with speculation.
#15001380
He also suspends the privilege of the writ of habeas corpus, for reasons of public safety, along a line from Philadelphia to Washington, upon the discretion of General Scott.


IMHO, Lincoln’s grant of the power to suspend habeus corpus to General Scott was one of the greatest blots on his presidency, a clearly unconstitutional act since the exception to the requirement for habeus corpus in the Constitution is given to Congress—or more specifically, Congress is banned from suspending habeus corpus except in cases of rebellion or invasion when the public safety requires it (Article I, Section 9). One can argue that the President should be the one with that power, given the possible need for haste, but apparently the Founders disagreed.
#15001480
April 28, Sunday

President Lincoln visits the Seventh New York, quartered in the House of Representatives Chamber in the Federal Capitol.

The frigate Constitution arrives in New York en route to Newport, Rhode Island.
#15001483
Doug64 wrote:IMHO, Lincoln’s grant of the power to suspend habeus corpus to General Scott was one of the greatest blots on his presidency, a clearly unconstitutional act since the exception to the requirement for habeus corpus in the Constitution is given to Congress—or more specifically, Congress is banned from suspending habeus corpus except in cases of rebellion or invasion when the public safety requires it (Article I, Section 9). One can argue that the President should be the one with that power, given the possible need for haste, but apparently the Founders disagreed.

Given the circumstances, he can hardly be blamed for panicking. For a time, it looked as though Washington DC itself might fall, even before the War had properly got started. Washington was simply too close to the front lines.