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User avatar
By XogGyux
#15111463


LOL
Seriously, this is like trying to explain grandpa why the floppy disk cannot be inserted in the CD ROM tray.
Then, Biden is the one that is "Demented".
ROFL
Who is allowing this guy to appear on interviews? Seriously, whoever is allowing him to do the interviews should get fired and they should hire one of Joe's team that has kept him safely hidden away from a TV camera :lol:
Last edited by XogGyux on 04 Aug 2020 21:33, edited 1 time in total.
By Doug64
#15111469
Remember those polls that set the number of Republican voters at 25%? Here’s another piece of news to disturb Democrats’ sleep:

Trump is registering more new voters than Democrats in key states

    The Trump campaign and RNC have now registered 100,000 new voters in the 2020 cycle, more than doubling their numbers from 2016 and shrinking Democrats' registration advantage in key swing states, according to new Trump Victory data provided exclusively to Axios.

    Why it matters: Democrats still have more active registered voters in Pennsylvania, North Carolina and Florida, but Republicans have managed to narrow the margins in those states by tens of thousands of voters since 2016.

    Between the lines: Trump won Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Florida, Arizona and Iowa in 2016, but former Vice President Joe Biden is currently ahead in the polls in all but Iowa, according to FiveThirtyEight.

    But Republicans have narrowed the voter registration gap in key swing states, according to Axios' reviews of those states records.

    • Republicans have lessened the margin by 133,000 registered voters in Pennsylvania and 87,000 voters in Florida.
    • Republicans have also chipped away at Democrats' advantage in the tossup state of North Carolina — gaining a net 216,410 voters since Election Day 2016.
      Meanwhile in Arizona and Iowa, Trump Victory has managed to slow voter registration momentum behind Democrats.
    • In Iowa, the number of registered Democratic voters surpassed Republicans in March, but Republicans recently took back the advantage. Democrats had been outpacing Republicans in Arizona as well — but since April, Republicans have overtaken them.

    The big picture: Coronavirus has drastically changed the voter registration game. Activists and volunteers typically focus their efforts on big events, college campuses or other crowded locations. But crowds are rarer in a pandemic.

    • 45% of voter registration applications come from the DMV, but even those have been shut down or offer limited services because of the virus in many states.

    What to watch: This comes as President Trump continues to rail against mail-in-voting. Many Republican leaders privately admit that absentee ballots are needed to ensure registered Republican voters actually vote, particularly older, white voters.

    What they're saying: “As enthusiasm for President Trump continues to grow, so does the Republican Party. Over 100,000 new voters are ready to cast their ballot for four more years of President Trump’s ‘Promises Made, Promises Kept’ agenda, and elect Republicans up and down the ballot on November 3rd,” RNC Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel said in a statement.

    The other side: Registered voters have to actually cast a ballot in order to make a difference.

    • “Across the battlegrounds, the Biden-DNC coordinated campaign is crushing Republicans in key field metrics like vote-by-mail requests, registration and turnout -- and we’re going to keep our foot on the gas so we ensure Trump is a one-term president,” David Bergstein, DNC Director of Battleground State Communications told Axios.
User avatar
By Drlee
#15111474
@Drlee So you believe we should shut down the schools every flu season?


You really aren't able to understand this, are you? You really do not know have the knowledge to understand why this question makes you look stupid or uneducated. We have been down this road too many times. If you are unable to understand the science it is not important for me to explain it to you again. :roll:

Actually, why wait for then? After all, the flu season is just when the flu is most likely, in truth that silent killer stalks our schools year-round.


Nonsense. But them I have to remind myself that you have no medical training whatsoever.



And since “dead kids don’t need pencils, dead teachers can’t teach, dead Grandmas can’t ...” we should shut down those incubators of disease entirely. After all, every life matters, no matter what the CDC says.


You actually have not read "what the CDC" said about opening schools. The CDC opposes opening schools in communities with high infection rates.

But you just keep advocating for death. Perhaps nobody you know will get it. That is all that matters. That and the economy. I don't care if republicans want to die for the economy. That is their choice. I dislike the fact that people like you are willing to kill for it.
User avatar
By XogGyux
#15111480
The issue with school is deeper than whether to allow in school teaching or not.
It seems there is no national protocol and/or intervention other than a very generic document from CDC.
These people need to know what to monitor, not just students and/or staff but also the general community.
They need protocols of what are going to be the steps to take when someone is sick and/or tests positive.
What happens when parents make plans (i.e. return to work) and 2 days later this parent gets a call that the kid needs to stay at home for 14 days because was exposed to another kid? That is going to happen very often, possibly even multiple times to the same parent.. You don't think that is far more disruptive to the professional life of a parent?
What about when there is not enough staff to cover because they are either sick and/or quarantined because of exposure and/or staying at home because their kids are quarantined.

As much as having schools "closed" is an inconvenience, having this back and forth is probably just as bad or worse.

I have no horse in this race, I have no kids yet and no teachers in my family. I don't really know what is the best approach but what I do know is that it is not as simple as saying open this or keep this closed.
Ideally, we could have prevented this from reaching this dire checkpoint.
User avatar
By Drlee
#15111502
I think there is another aspect to this that we jumped over all to quickly. That is the value of in-school teaching versus online teaching. We have a few hundred years of only using the one example. But. Consider the conservative position.

Conservative people, often conservative Christians, have been home schooling in significant numbers for decades. Clearly it has the need for a parent to be home or work from home. Here is the result of one study:

The evidence is clear that homeschooling has academic advantages over the public school system for students. In analyzing the data and reading the results regarding socioeconomic status not being a factor, it should reinforce the belief that every child can learn. Interestingly, research reveals that parent’s education had little or nothing to do with the success of the homeschooling. The rate of college attendance for home schooled students far surpasses the rate of public schooled children. There are only about 50 percent of the homeschooled student’s parents who have attended college. However, approximately 75 percent of homeschooled students attend college. A staggering 50 percent of the public schooled counterparts dropped out of school (Chang et al., 2011)What is not as clear is why. Why is homeschooling so successful? Studies suggest many factors including the parents being emotionally connected to their children with a good understanding of who they are as individuals and students. Since homeschoolers typically score higher on standardized tests than those who attend public school in recent years more and more
HOME SCHOOL VS. PUBLIC SCHOOLED 29people are talking openly about homeschooled students (Chang et al., 2011; Cogan, 2010; Academic Stats, 2004). The media, colleges, and universities are praising homeschooled students by presenting them with awards for academic success. Such competitions as the national spelling and national geography competitions has recognized bright homeschooled students it has put a feather in the cap of homeschoolers and has helped to debunk the myths surrounding homeschooled students (Romanoswski, 2006). SocializationWhen picturing a homeschooled student one might see a scared un-socialized student sitting in the corner of a room full of public schooled students on the first day of classes at a large university. The truth is, they do not have any further adjustment issues than their counterparts who attended public schools. “Homeschool parents are aware of the issue of socialization and are strongly committed to providing positive socialization opportunities for their children” (Romanoswski, 2006, p. 126). Homeschooling allows for parents and groups of parents to be supportive of each other. Since homeschool parents are aware of the issue of socialization and are strongly committed to providing positive socialization opportunities for their children they ensure their children are involved in social events on a regular basis(Romanoswski, 2006). Since children often give in to peer pressure, parents’ ability to pick the socialization activities can be advantageous. In light of the prominence of bullying, cyber bullying and violence in public schools, homeschooling has become a virtuous alternative for students who are bullied (Davis, 2010)


So have we actually studied a hybrid of home/online school? Could not this be the answer, at least in the near term? I get that school is a marvelous babysitter but perhaps that is simply not "worth it".

Maybe it would not be so bad a thing (and worth financially subsidizing) to have parents who are able school as many kids as possible at home. The average spent per student (and yes I know this is overly simplistic) is about $12,000. per year. If parents got, say $8,000 of that to school their kids at home and the district got $4K to provide support we could have a near solution. Especially for parents with more than one kid.

This is a rare time in our history. Time to think out of the box.
User avatar
By XogGyux
#15111513
Drlee wrote:I think there is another aspect to this that we jumped over all to quickly. That is the value of in-school teaching versus online teaching. We have a few hundred years of only using the one example. But. Consider the conservative position.

Conservative people, often conservative Christians, have been home schooling in significant numbers for decades. Clearly it has the need for a parent to be home or work from home. Here is the result of one study:



So have we actually studied a hybrid of home/online school? Could not this be the answer, at least in the near term? I get that school is a marvelous babysitter but perhaps that is simply not "worth it".

Maybe it would not be so bad a thing (and worth financially subsidizing) to have parents who are able school as many kids as possible at home. The average spent per student (and yes I know this is overly simplistic) is about $12,000. per year. If parents got, say $8,000 of that to school their kids at home and the district got $4K to provide support we could have a near solution. Especially for parents with more than one kid.

This is a rare time in our history. Time to think out of the box.


For one, it is not the same thing a parent that "chooses" to home school a child vs a parent that "has to" because of the socio-economic/health. The one that chooses might have a vocation for this, or perhaps he/she was homeschooled himself/herself and has some experience, or perhaps there were multiple children and the first one didn't go so well. As far as studies go, the methodology is important and just want to point out that correlation does not imply causation. Maybe the households that choose to homeschool are better off financially (after all, they can afford to have a parent at home), or maybe the kids do get in college more often but do not translate into better overall success (e.i they might enter/finish college because they are more socially isolated and less distracted by social events/pressure but later in life suffer because of this?) and many other factors... to be clear I am not claiming that any of this is happening, after all I did not review all those papers, but just pointing out the examples of how some co-founding variables can exist and no matter how good the study design, chances are there are many unaccounted variables (regardless of whether or not they change the outcome).

I while ago I heard something along the lines of "school is not to learn what it factually accurate, but to learn what others are learning" and this points out the fact that sometimes we learn crap stuff, but if you and I learn the same crap we can reasonably function in the world. If my crap is different from your crap, then we might have issues :lol: .

In any event, short term... this might be necessary REGARDLESS of which one is better if any. Long term... I don't know if I would want my kids to grow in a world without schools. I am an introvert who enjoys being an introvert (kind of schizoid personality disorder :lol: ) and still thinks school is important.

Financially it would ruin teachers/school staff.
By Doug64
#15111597
Drlee wrote:You really aren't able to understand this, are you? You really do not know have the knowledge to understand why this question makes you look stupid or uneducated. We have been down this road too many times. If you are unable to understand the science it is not important for me to explain it to you again. :roll:

Yes, please explain to me how children never catch the flu from their classmates, and how they never die from it even if they do.
User avatar
By XogGyux
#15111598
Doug64 wrote:Yes, please explain to me how children never catch the flu from their classmates, and how they never die from it even if they do.

They do, so do their teachers and their parents/family back at home when they bring it.
User avatar
By Hindsite
#15111603
Drlee wrote:This is a rare time in our history. Time to think out of the box.

Maybe that is another reason for voting Trump 2020.
Praise the Lord.
User avatar
By Chad
#15111650
"If Biden wasn't an Antifa Loving, BLM Supporting, Police Defunding, Leftist Communist Democrat he would still be a Brain Dead Career Criminal Politician that is a Chinese sellout. So many stupid leftist that considered a known communist like Bernie and now the squatting green cloud squad. AOC is a POS. Obama Gate is finally getting the attention it deserves and crooked Hillary is going to finally cough up the truth about the Clinton "Globalist" Canary that was hidden in America's Coal mines.



There is nothing worse than a condescending liberal racist that treats minorities as less capable people. The idea that the lefties are needed to hold the hand of people that cannot perform without help.[/quote]
Julian658 wrote:Beethoven made money with his music.

There is nothing worse than a condescending liberal racist that treats minorities as less capable people. The idea that the lefties are needed to hold the hand of people that cannot perform without help.
Julian658 wrote:
Beethoven made money with his music.

There is nothing worse than a condescending liberal racist that treats minorities as less capable people. The idea that the lefties are needed to hold the hand of people that cannot perform without help.
Julian658 wrote:
Beethoven made money with his music.

There is nothing worse than a condescending liberal racist that treats minorities as less capable people. The idea that the lefties are needed to hold the hand of people that cannot perform without help.
Pants-of-dog wrote:If Biden used the Coronavirus as an opportunity to enact public health care, he would almost certainly win.
User avatar
By Julian658
#15111654
Pants-of-dog wrote:No, I am saying that a large percentage of the people in the USA are:

a) stupid, and
b) lash out at people they think are smarter than them.

For example, they accuse us of being condescending.

I only know I know nothing POD.
User avatar
By Drlee
#15111671
@Julian658 I only know I know nothing POD.


We could have told you that. 8)
User avatar
By Beren
#15111787
Euronews wrote:Facebook deletes Donald Trump's post for spreading misinformation about coronavirus

By AP • last updated: 06/08/2020 - 11:52

ImageThe US president had posted a video in which he claimed children were "virtually immune" to coronavirus

A Facebook post from Donald Trump has been deleted by the platform after it said the US president had violated its policy against misinformation about the coronavirus.

Trump had posted a link to a Fox News video in which he had claimed children were "virtually immune" to COVID-19, prompting Facebook to act.

In a statement on Wednesday, the social network said the video "includes false claims that a group of people is immune from COVID-19, which is a violation of our policies around harmful COVID misinformation."

Twitter followed suit a few hours later by blocking the Trump campaign from posting anything until it also removed a tweet linking to the same video.

It said the tweet, which was retweeted by Trump's account, had violated COVID-19 misinformation rules.

When a tweet breaks its rules, Twitter asks users to remove the tweet and bans them from posting anything else until they do.

Twitter has generally been quicker than Facebook in recent months to label posts from the president that violate its policies against misinformation and abuse.

This is not the first time that Facebook has removed a post from Trump, the platform said, but it's the first time it has done so because it was spreading misinformation about the new coronavirus. The company has also labelled his posts.


Several studies suggest, but don’t prove, that children are less likely to become infected than adults and more likely to have only mild symptoms. But this is not the same as being “virtually immune” to the virus.

A US Centres for Disease Control (CDC) study involving 2,500 children published in April found that about 1 in 5 infected children were hospitalised versus 1 in 3 adults; three children died.

The study lacks complete data on all the cases, but it also suggests that many infected children have no symptoms, which could allow them to spread the virus to others.

Oops.
User avatar
By Tainari88
#15111790
:lol:
Drlee wrote:We could have told you that. 8)


:lol: QFT.
By Doug64
#15111891
Beren wrote:Oops.

Yes, I agree, FaceBook and Twitter really screwed up. They aren't even trying to hide their attempts to sabotage the Trump campaign anymore.

Image
User avatar
By Drlee
#15111894
Wait. Doug. You think it is Facebook and Twitter that is trying to sabotage Trump's campaign. :lol: :lol: :lol:

By the way. Only a Trump supporter would believe that looking for a qualified woman of color is somehow racist. But then Trump supporters are not the sharpest knives in the drawer.
By Sivad
#15111896
Drlee wrote:
Maybe it would not be so bad a thing (and worth financially subsidizing) to have parents who are able school as many kids as possible at home. The average spent per student (and yes I know this is overly simplistic) is about $12,000. per year. If parents got, say $8,000 of that to school their kids at home and the district got $4K to provide support we could have a near solution. Especially for parents with more than one kid.

This is a rare time in our history. Time to think out of the box.


Micro-schooling is the reinvention of the one-room school house, where class size is typically smaller than that in most schools (15 students or less in a classroom) and there are mixed-age level groupings.

Micro-schooling is seen as being in between homeschooling and private schooling and is designed to offer a full-year of education at around $10,000 or often less. Its growing popularity stems from a general dissatisfaction of how schools (public and private) often structure their content. Homeschool families are drawn to the idea because of how micro-schooling establishes a core set of learning experiences similar to what might be found in normal schools that parents can then expand on and individualize for their children. Private and public school parents see micro-schooling as an affordable option that provides their children with a more worldly education.
User avatar
By Beren
#15111920
Doug64 wrote:Yes, I agree, FaceBook and Twitter really screwed up. They aren't even trying to hide their attempts to sabotage the Trump campaign anymore.

Facebook and Twitter seem to be responsible, while Trump appears to be unconcerned about children's health, life, and safety, with which he doesn't really help himself, I guess.
By Doug64
#15111933
Beren wrote:Facebook and Twitter seem to be responsible, while Trump appears to be unconcerned about children's health, life, and safety, with which he doesn't really help himself, I guess.

First, Facebook and Twitter had to lie about what Trump said to justify their bans. They claim he said children are immune, when he said that children are almost immune, which is true--so far California has had 10,028 deaths, and only one was someone under eighteen; that's 0.0001% of the deaths. For the United States as a whole, according to the CDC there have been twenty deaths for those below fifteen (0.000123%), 225 for those below 25 (0.00138%). That looks "almost immune" to me. It's not hard to see why Facebook and Twitter are trying to keep more people from realizing that Trump is right in this case, not when it can help his campaign and they are seeing news stories like this:

CNN: 'Trump is within striking distance of Biden'

    Even CNN now admits that the race between President Trump and Joseph R. Biden is close. Very close.

    In an analysis released Thursday, senior political analyst Harry Enten wrote that Mr. Biden has had the “upper hand” in national polls and those conducted in such battleground states as Arizona and Florida.

    “Yet, while Biden has maintained advantage, Trump has one thing going for him: His position is no longer deteriorating. A look at the polls shows that even as coronavirus cases and deaths rise, Trump remains within striking distancing of Biden,” Mr. Enten noted.

    “An Iowa poll out Wednesday from Monmouth University makes the point well. Trump comes in with 48% to Biden’s 45%, a 3-point margin and a result within the poll’s margin of error,” he said.

    Mr. Enten also cited a Des Moines Register survey which found Mr. Trump with 44% support, Mr. Biden at 43%. He pointed to other polling evidence, both state and national, which suggested a positive tilt for the president, noting that Mr. Trump’s ratings have stabilized — “and perhaps improved a few points.”

    The influence of the coronavirus pandemic and ongoing civil unrest has also been a factor in voter sentiment, the analyst wrote.

    “The current difference between the polls at this point and the result isn’t wide enough to suggest Biden has this locked away given how much polls have moved from this point to the election historically. Yes, Biden has held a relatively steady lead, which makes him a clear favorite,” Mr. Enten said.

    “But in a year in which we are facing unprecedented circumstances, Trump is staying in the hunt,” he said.

During the Wuhan virus period of the campaign Biden has topped out with an RCP polling average of +10.2 on June 22nd, now shrunk to +6.4. The race is narrowing and the Trump campaign hasn't pulled out the big guns yet, I suspect they're waiting until after the Democratic convention when Biden will be locked in as the nominee. And they must be salivating over the upcoming debates (assuming they happen, Biden's supporters are laying the foundations for a refusal to debate, which will be damaging as well but perhaps not as much). Those determined to prevent Trump's reelection at any cost must be getting desperate. They aren't being helped by continuing in kind contributions to the Trump and Republican campaigns by the teachers' unions:

Parents see teachers union gamesmanship, demand return to in-school learning

    Some parents are fighting back as teachers unions push to keep classrooms closed, arguing that the school reopenings are being hijacked by an agenda that appears to be more about political gamesmanship than the science behind the coronavirus.

    That includes Jesse Petrilla of Orange County, California. His 6-year-old son used to love kindergarten but quickly became bored and restless with the worksheets-and-Zoom experience. Mr. Petrilla calls it “nonsense, bogus distance learning.”

    “We’re pulling our hair out and counting the days until he can go back to school,” Mr. Petrilla said. “We’ve been really lucky that my wife’s been able to stay home with him and take time off work, but it’s getting to the point where there’s such a decline in his attitude that I’m really afraid of the long-term effects if this goes on another year.”

    Mr. Petrilla is doing more than waiting: He and 14 other parents are plaintiffs in a lawsuit filed by the Center for American Liberty challenging California’s July 17 order that ties in-person school reopening to stabilized county COVID-19 figures, a standard that will keep 80% of children from returning to their public and private schools this fall.

    Do the parents worry about their children catching COVID-19? “I get asked that all the time,” said Christine Ruiz of Los Angeles County, who has three sons, including two with special needs.

    California has recorded a spike in positivity rates and case numbers over the summer, but Ms. Ruiz said she refuses to be controlled by fear.

    “I’m listening to the doctors, the pediatricians, the Centers for Disease Control director, who all say that it is imperative and extremely essential for our children’s mental health and education for them to be in school,” she said. “As long as the school district takes precautions and spacing measures, your child should be fine.”

    Jesse Melgar, a spokesman for California Gov. Gavin Newsom, a Democrat, said “science drives the state’s decisions in this pandemic.”

    “We will defend this challenge to the governor’s exercise of emergency authority in this crisis as we have all others, and we note that every federal court to rule on such a challenge to date has ruled that the exercise of authority is lawful,” Mr. Melgar said in an email.

    Elsewhere, parents fed up with online learning have launched Facebook pages and petitions calling for the resumption of in-classroom learning, pushing back against concerns that in-person learning will fuel another outbreak of COVID-19.

    In Montgomery County, Maryland, parents held a protest Wednesday against an order by Dr. Travis Gayles, the county health officer, closing private and religious schools until Oct. 1, a mandate he reissued after Gov. Larry Hogan, a Republican, moved to override the order.

    “This is not the same epidemic it was in April,” Darnestown parent Kevin O’Rourke said in Bethesda magazine. “We know more, we know how to treat it more, our hospitals are better prepared. This is government overreach for some reasons that still haven’t been adequately explained to us.”

    Parents who want to reopen public schools face formidable opposition from teachers unions. Demand Safe Schools, a coalition of a dozen urban union affiliates, the Democratic Socialists of America, and the Center for Popular Democracy held nationwide protests Monday against in-person instruction.

    The teachers pulled no punches. They used skeletons and tombstones to illustrate their message that instructors would be placing their lives on the line if they return to the classroom.

    “Your Multiplication is NOT worth MY LIFE!” said a message on a car at the Milwaukee Teachers Education Association rally. Another said, “I can’t teach dead kids!” as shown in photos on the Milwaukee Public Radio website.

    Mr. Petrilla noted that United Teachers Los Angeles issued reopening demands last month that included items not normally associated with the three R’s, including defunding the police.

    “They want to defund the police, they want Medicare for all, they want all these things that have absolutely nothing to do with coronavirus,” Mr. Petrilla said. “They’ve been exploiting the opportunity for them to get as much as they can, and it’s really sad.”

    Still, the demonstrations had an impact. Chicago Public Schools on Wednesday changed a plan to open with a hybrid of remote and in-person learning and opted instead for all-distance instruction amid rumblings over a possible “safety strike.”

    Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot, a Democrat, denied that the protests were the driver. She told reporters that when the hybrid model was announced last month, “we were in a very different place in the arc of the pandemic.”

    Risks of virus vs. staying home

    Those who favor reopening have in their corner experts like Dr. Jayanta Bhattacharya, a professor of medicine at Stanford University, who said harms to children from keeping classrooms shuttered outweigh the risks from COVID-19.

    “The harms from kids getting COVID are much, much less than from adults getting COVID,” said Dr. Bhattacharya. “[Children] die at much, much lower rates than adults. I think there’s only one child, an 18-year-old, who has died in California during the whole epidemic. The flu is a bigger risk to kids than COVID is to kids.”

    He said children have a “different immune response to COVID than adults” and cited the “long-lasting harms,” including increased loneliness, lack of socialization, learning difficulties and poorer educational outcomes from watching teachers on Zoom versus attending class.

    “Those harms are unequally distributed, with poor kids facing larger harms than richer kids who have access to tutors and pods and other mechanisms,” he said. “I think the harms are very, very high for kids not going to school.”

    Dr. Bhattacharya is more than a disinterested observer. He has three teenagers and said he would readily send all of them back to school for in-person learning.

    “I would be very comfortable with sending them back to school in-person,” he said. “The harms to them from staying home and missing out on the school experiences will last a lifetime.”

    Mr. Newsom cited the threat to California teachers last month in announcing the school shutdown. “We have hundreds of thousands of adults that are responsible for taking care of and educating our kids as well. And their health has to be considered,” he said.

    Given the lower risks to children, Dr. Scott Atlas, former neurology chief of the Stanford University Medical Center, said the focus for schools should be on protecting at-risk teachers by, for example, allowing them to teach remotely rather than having students stay at home.

    “I think the teachers unions — I’m going to give them the benefit of the doubt and say they’re afraid — and if they’re afraid, we can accommodate the high-risk teachers,” said Dr. Atlas. “The majority of teachers are not high risk: 92% are under 60, and half are under 41. Do you know how young that is? This is a young profession. They have extremely low risk, and those at high risk can be accommodated.”

    Others are wary of the unions’ political agenda. Among Demand Safe Schools’ conditions for returning to school are police-free schools; a moratorium on new charter schools, vouchers and standardized tests; canceling rents and mortgages; and a “massive infusion of federal money to support the reopening funded by taxing billionaires and Wall Street.”

    “I think teachers have got to be the ones that should be the most furious,” said Mr. Petrilla. “They should be allowed to do their jobs and not have their union hijack this for ridiculous demands.”

    A National Public Radio/Ipsos poll released Thursday found that 66% of K-12 teachers surveyed want to start the school year primarily with remote learning, while 34% favor a primarily in-person reopening. Fully 82% have concerns about returning to class.

    Ms. Ruiz said that isn’t what she is hearing from the teachers she knows from her years of PTA volunteering. She said “100% of the teachers I’ve spoken to say, ‘No, we want to get back to class. We want to teach our kids.’

    “I think what the school unions are telling you is not the actual representative opinion of teachers,” Ms. Ruiz said. “Even Los Angeles teachers that I know, they’re saying, ‘Go fight, we totally support you, this is not what we want, we’re being held hostage by these unions, and their decision-making is not our decision-making.’”

    None of those in his household has contracted COVID-19, said Mr. Petrilla, but he added that “I’m not discounting the danger of this virus.

    “Nobody’s talking about going back to school business as usual,” he said. “There are mitigations that could include temperature-taking at the doors, teachers wearing masks, a whole host of things that each district should come up with based on state guidance.”

    He has no doubt that schools are up to the challenge. “We’ve got robots driving around on Mars,” he said. “I think we could figure out how to come up with ways to keep the teachers safe and open the schools safely.”
User avatar
By Beren
#15111934
However, @Doug64, Trump still seems to be losing that communications, PR- or marketing warfare while appearing to be a careless nutjob.
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