Key Rasmussen Polls - Page 59 - Politics Forum.org | PoFo

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By Doug64
#15034307
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Forty-two percent (42%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending September 12.

    Nearly one-out-of-three Likely Democratic Voters (32%) favor declaring the NRA a terrorist organization in the community where they live. Fourteen percent (14%) of Republicans and 20% of voters not affiliated with either major party agree.

    35% of Likely U.S. Voters now believe illegal immigrants should be eligible for driver’s licenses in their state. That’s up from 28% two years ago and the highest finding in surveys since 2007. Fifty-seven percent (57%) still oppose making illegal immigrants eligible for licenses where they live, but that’s down from 77% 12 years ago.

    21% of American Adults have tried one of the sandwiches made with plant-derived products that many fast food chains are now offering.

    53% of Likely U.S. Voters think the United States and its allies are winning the War on Terrorism. That’s down slightly from 56% a year ago but consistent with findings since President Trump's election in November 2016. Prior to that time, this finding generally ran from the mid-20s to the low 40s. Just 16% now believe the terrorists are winning, while 25% say neither side is ahead.

    44% of Likely U.S. Voters favor the use of fracking to produce more oil and natural gas for this country. Thirty-six percent (36%) are opposed. This compares to 46% and 39% respectively last year. A sizable 20% are undecided.

    The Rasmussen Reports Economic Index held steady at 140.8 in September, virtually unchanged from last month and still among 2019's highs to date. Enthusiasm about the economy started to grow immediately following Donald Trump's election as president in November 2016 and spiked to 145.9 in February 2018. By comparison, in President Obama’s final years in office, this index reached a high of 121.5 in January 2015 and was at 108.1 his last month in the White House.

    53% of Likely U.S. Voters oppose a taxpayer bailout of underfunded union pension funds. Just 26% support a pension bailout. A sizable 21% are undecided.

    And for the President's job approval over the last week:

    • Strongly Approve: 34% (+2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43%
    • Total Approve: 47% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 52% (-1)

    And over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 33% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 42%
    • Total Approve: 47%
    • Total Disapprove: 52%
By Hindsite
#15034341
Doug64 wrote:Nearly one-out-of-three Likely Democratic Voters (32%) favor declaring the NRA a terrorist organization in the community where they live. Fourteen percent (14%) of Republicans and 20% of voters not affiliated with either major party agree.

They think I am a terrorist? Those people need mental health treatment immediately.
By Doug64
#15035334
Hindsite wrote:They think I am a terrorist? Those people need mental health treatment immediately.

Note that the actual question didn't ask if the NRA is a terrorist organization, but that their local communities should declare them such--not quite the same thing.

Here's the actual questions from that poll of Likely Voters:

Do you have a very favorable, somewhat favorable, somewhat unfavorable or very unfavorable impression of the National Rifle Association, also known as the NRA?

Very favorable 30%
Somewhat favorable 20%
Somewhat unfavorable 11%
Very unfavorable 33%
Not sure 6%

Republicans

Very favorable 54%
Somewhat favorable 24%
Somewhat unfavorable 7%
Very unfavorable 11%
Not sure 5%

Independents
Very favorable 21%
Somewhat favorable 21%
Somewhat unfavorable 12%
Very unfavorable 38%
Not sure 7%

Democrats
Very favorable 16%
Somewhat favorable 16%
Somewhat unfavorable 13%
Very unfavorable 48%
Not sure 7%

Are NRA members more likely or less likely to commit a crime with a gun? Or is the level of gun crime by NRA members about the same as in the population at large?

More likely 13%
Less likely 47%
The level of gun crime by NRA members is about the same as in the population at large 28%
Not sure 12%

Republicans
More likely 12%
Less likely 66%
The level of gun crime by NRA members is about the same as in the population at large 15%
Not sure 7%

Independents
More likely 9%
Less likely 46%
The level of gun crime by NRA members is about the same as in the population at large 30%
Not sure 14%

Democrats
More likely 17%
Less likely 31%
The level of gun crime by NRA members is about the same as in the population at large 37%
Not sure 15%

Following several recent mass shootings, officials in San Francisco have declared the NRA a domestic terrorist organization, although the decision has no specific impact on the NRA or its members. Do you favor or oppose declaring the NRA a terrorist organization in the community where you live?

Favor 23%
Oppose 61%
Not sure 16%

Republicans
Favor 14%
Oppose 78%
Not sure 8%

Independents
Favor 20%
Oppose 66%
Not sure 14%

Democrats
Favor 32%
Oppose 43%
Not sure 25%

Should Americans be prohibited by law from belonging to pro-gun rights organizations like the NRA?

Yes 18%
No 72%
Not sure 10%

Republicans
Yes 15%
No 80%
Not sure 6%

Independents
Yes 10%
No 81%
Not sure 9%

Democrats
Yes 28%
No 57%
Not sure 15%
By Doug64
#15035335
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Forty-two percent (42%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending September 12.

    20% of American Adults think homelessness should be primarily a federal responsibility. 37% think states are chiefly responsible for dealing with the homeless, while 27% view homelessness as a local responsibility. Sixteen percent (16%) are undecided.

    75% of American Adults believe the U.S. Constitution guarantees the right of an average citizen to own a gun. Just 15% disagree. Ten percent (10%) are not sure. These findings are virtually unchanged in surveying since Rasmussen Reports first asked this question ten years ago.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds Biden with 35% support among Likely Democratic Voters. Warren, a U.S. senator from Massachusetts, and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders remain in second and third place with 15% and 14% of the Democratic vote respectively.

    44% of Likely U.S. Voters favor extending the Medicare program, now just for those 65 and older, to Americans of all ages. Forty-one percent (41%) are opposed, while 15% are not sure. These findings are little changed from December of last year.

    14% of American Adults favor the banning of red caps in America. Seventy percent (70%) are opposed, but another 17% are undecided.

    18% of all Likely U.S. Voters think Congress is likely to impeach Kavanaugh, and that includes just seven percent (7%) who say it’s Very Likely. Seventy percent (70%) consider Kavanaugh’s impeachment unlikely, with forty-one percent (41%) who say it’s Not At All Likely. Eleven percent (11%) are not sure.

    33% of Likely U.S. Voters believe it would be better for society if women held more political positions than men. 12% think it would be worse for society. A plurality (45%) thinks it would have no impact.

    And for the President's job approval over the last week:

    • Strongly Approve: 36% (+2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 39% (-4)
    • Total Approve: 50% (+3)
    • Total Disapprove: 49% (-3)

    And over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 34% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 41% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 48% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 51% (-1)
Last edited by Doug64 on 22 Sep 2019 06:57, edited 1 time in total.
By Hindsite
#15035382
Doug64 wrote:Note that the actual question didn't ask if the NRA is a terrorist organization, but that their local communities should declare them such--not quite the same thing.

Yes, However, the fact that 32% of likely Democrat voters are in favor of declaring the NRA, which includes members like me, a terrorist organization is reason enough to keep them out of political power to actually do such a thing.
User avatar
By Drlee
#15035438
Well it seems this false flag operation is working. Of course democrats have no intention of doing any such thing or coming after your guns or mine. This is just more hogwash republicans are using to excite their base. They should be thankful that Beto played right into it.

It is entirely possible that this will be the real issue that hands the election to Trump. It is certainly going to let them keep the Senate.
By Doug64
#15038259
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-nine percent (39%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending September 26.

    Fifty-six percent (56%) of Likely U.S. Voters think there is a shortage of safe and affordable housing in America today. Just 28% disagree, but 16% are not sure.

    52% of American Adults believe America’s racial and ethnic diversity is mostly good for the country. Only 17% think diversity is mostly a bad thing, while 22% say it has no impact.

    65% of Likely U.S. Voters think Biden is likely to be the Democrats’ presidential candidate next year, although only 23% consider that Very Likely. Twenty-eight percent (28%) say he is unlikely to be nominated, but just nine percent (9%) say it’s Not At All Likely.

    49% of Likely U.S. Voters read the New York Times at least occasionally, although just seven percent (7%) say they read it daily or nearly every day. Among those who read the Times, only 33% think most stories it reports are usually accurate. Another 34% say they are often accurate. But 25% say most stories in the New York Times are seldom accurate, while three percent (3%) believe they are never accurate.

    43% of Likely U.S. Voters think Trump is more likely than Biden to be found guilty of breaking the law in his dealings with Ukrainian officials. Thirty-four percent (34%) say Biden is more likely to be the culprit. Six percent (6%) believe both men are likely to be found guilty of criminal wrongdoing. Eight percent (8%) say neither is likely to be found guilty. But 46% think it’s more likely that Trump will be reelected in 2020 than defeated by the Democratic nominee or impeached, unchanged from late July.

    And for the President's job approval over the last week:

    • Strongly Approve: 36%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 41% (+2)
    • Total Approve: 51% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 47% (-2)

    And over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 34%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 41%
    • Total Approve: 48%
    • Total Disapprove: 50% (-1)
By Doug64
#15039908
I'm on time this week! Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-nine percent (39%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending September 26.

    Forty-four percent (44%) now rate the way Trump is handling issues related to immigration as good or excellent. Forty-three percent (43%) say he’s doing a poor job. These findings are little changed from July. Trump’s positives peaked at 48% in October of last year.

    52% of Likely U.S. Voters think Trump is more to blame than his political opponents for the division in America. That’s up from 45% in April of last year. Thirty-eight percent (38%) blame the president’s political opponents more, down from 43% in January. Ten percent (10%) are undecided. But 34% say America would be more divided if Clinton had been elected president in 2016. Thirty-six percent (36%) say it would be less divided, while 25% figure the level of division would be about the same.

    17% of American Adults believe professional athletes are more likely to commit a crime than the average American. Just as many (16%) say they are less likely to do so. Fifty-one percent (51%) think the level of criminality among pro athletes is about the same as it is in the general population. Sixteen percent (16%) are undecided. But 54% believe professional athletes get favorable treatment from law enforcement authorities. Only 26% think they are treated like everyone else, while 20% are not sure.

    53% of Likely U.S. Voters are angry at the president, with 39% who are Very Angry. Forty-six percent (46%) are not angry at Trump, including 34% who are Not At All Angry. Forty-nine percent (49%) are angry at Trump’s political opponents, including 32% who are Very Angry. Forty-six percent (46%) aren’t angry with the president’s foes, with 24% who are Not At All Angry. These findings are little changed from July of last year. In June 2017, 48% were angry at Trump, 51% at his political opponents. But 61% of voters are angry at the media; 38% are not. This includes 40% who are Very Angry and just 19% who are Not At All Angry. Fifty-three percent (53%) were angry at the media in June of last year, but a high of 66% felt that way in June 2010, early in Barack Obama’s presidency.

    The president earned a monthly job approval of 48% in September, up one point from 47% in August. In January of this year, Trump’s monthly job approval had fallen to 44%, its lowest level in a year. But it jumped five points to 49% in February following his well-received State of the Union speech, recapturing the high ground he held for most of 2018. Fifty percent (50%) still disapproved of the president’s job performance last month, but that’s a two-point improvement from the month before.

    45% of all Likely U.S. Voters believe the impeachment of Trump would be good for the country. Just as many (46%) say it would be bad for the country instead. Only three percent (3%) think it would have no impact.

    38% of American Adults favor a law like California’s that allows college athletes in their state to be paid for the use of their names, images and likenesses. Slightly more (41%) oppose such a law in their home state. Twenty-one percent (21%) are undecided.

    And for the President's job approval over the last week:

    • Strongly Approve: 34% (-2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43% (+2)
    • Total Approve: 48% (-3)
    • Total Disapprove: 51% (+4)

    And over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 35% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 42% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 49% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 50%
By Doug64
#15041869
I'm on time this week! Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-six percent (36%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending October 4.

    Some have speculated that if Joe Biden falters in the race for the Democratic presidential nomination, Hillary Clinton will jump in. In a repeat matchup of the 2016 election, Clinton runs dead even with President Trump, each earning 45% support each among Likely U.S. Voters. The deciding 11% remains undecided. But even most Democrats don’t want her to get into the race. Just 18% think Clinton should enter the race for next year’s Democratic presidential nomination. Seventy-one percent (71%) don’t think she should run. Twelve percent (12%) are not sure.

    30% of Likely U.S. Voters think Congress is likely to seriously address the most important problems facing our nation. Sixty-eight percent (68%) consider that unlikely. These findings includes only 10% who feel Congress is Very Likely to tackle the big issues and 36% who say it’s Not At All Likely to do so.

    In defending his Syria decision on Monday, the president declared, “It is time for us to get out of these ridiculous endless wars, many of them tribal, and bring our soldiers home. We will fight where it is to our benefit, and only fight to win.” Fifty-eight percent (58%) of Likely U.S. Voters agree with Trump’s statement. Just 20% disagree, while 22% are not sure.

    70% of American Adults believe their fellow countrymen are less tolerant of each other’s political opinions than they were in the past. Only 11% say they are more tolerant of political differences, while 14% regard the level of political tolerance as about the same.

    80% of Democratic likely voters and unaffiliated voters by a 50% to 35% margin think Trump should release his tax returns to congressional Democrats. Sixty-eight percent (68%) of Republicans disagree.

    43% of Likely U.S. Voters think the Supreme Court is doing a good or excellent job. Sixteen percent (16%) rate its performance as poor.

    The Rasmussen Reports Economic Index held steady at 139.4 in October, virtually unchanged from last month and still among all-time highs to date.

    And for the President's job approval over the last week:

    • Strongly Approve: 34%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43%
    • Total Approve: 47% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 51%

    And over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 35%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 42%
    • Total Approve: 49%
    • Total Disapprove: 50%
User avatar
By Drlee
#15041873
Some have speculated that if Joe Biden falters in the race for the Democratic presidential nomination, Hillary Clinton will jump in. In a repeat matchup of the 2016 election, Clinton runs dead even with President Trump, each earning 45% support each among Likely U.S. Voters. The deciding 11% remains undecided. But even most Democrats don’t want her to get into the race. Just 18% think Clinton should enter the race for next year’s Democratic presidential nomination. Seventy-one percent (71%) don’t think she should run. Twelve percent (12%) are not sure.


Fake news disguised as a poll.
By Doug64
#15043991
A busy last week, hopefully things will slow down. Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-eight percent (38%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending October 17.

    56% of American Adults believe America should continue to honor Columbus with a national holiday. That’s down only slightly from 58% in 2017, the highest finding in surveys over the past 10 years. Just 26% oppose a national holiday for Columbus, while 18% are undecided.

    79% of Likely Democratic Voters have closely followed the debates among the Democratic presidential candidates, with 43% who have followed Very Closely. Among Democrats who have followed the debates, 53% still favor the candidate they liked before the debates. But 19% have switched their support to another candidate because of the debates. Twenty-eight percent (28%) remain undecided.

    49% of Likely U.S. Voters think Trump has a plan for where he wants to take the nation. Forty-four percent (44%) disagree. Fifty percent (50%) believe the Democratic Party has a plan for the future, little changed from 48% last October but up from 42% in 2017. Thirty-seven percent (37%) don’t agree, with 13% are undecided.

    47% of Likely U.S. Voters consider Syria a vital national security interest for the United States these days. That’s virtually unchanged from last December but down from a high of 58% in October 2016, President Obama’s final year in office. Thirty-three percent (33%) do not view Syria as critical to U.S. national security, a new high. Twenty percent (20%) are not sure.

    71% of American Adults regard their religious faith as important in their daily lives, with 44% who describe it as Very Important. This is consistent with findings in surveys for the past several years. Among Americans who say their religious faith is Very Important, 61% agree with Barr that “secular forces and their allies have marshaled all the forces of mass communication, popular culture, the entertainment industry and academia in an unremitting assault on religion and traditional values.” Sixty-seven percent (67%) of these voters also agree with Barr’s statement at Notre Dame University that “the problem is not that religion is being forced on others. The problem is that … secular values are being forced on people of faith.”

    13% of American Adults report that they had the flu last winter, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey. That’s down from 17% the winter before, a particularly bad flu season. Fifty-five percent (55%) intend to get a flu shot this year, down only slightly from a high of 59% in 2017 and in line with surveying for the past several years. Forty percent (40%) do not, but five percent (5%) haven’t made up their minds yet. Among those who had the flu last winter, 68% plan to get a flu shot.

    51% of Likely U.S. Voters think it’s likely senior law enforcement officials broke the law in an effort to prevent Donald Trump from winning the presidency. That includes 34% who say it’s Very Likely. Thirty-six percent (36%) consider high-level illegality as unlikely, with 22% who say it’s Not At All Likely. Thirteen percent (13%) are not sure. These findings have scarcely budged since February of last year. Even 42% of Democrats now suspect high-level wrongdoing to stop Trump, although that compares to 60% of Republicans and 51% of voters not affiliated with either major political party. Only 32% of all voters, however, believe it’s likely that criminal charges will be brought against senior law enforcement officials for their effort to stop Trump’s presidency, and that includes just 15% who say it’s Very Likely. Fifty-four percent (54%) view charges against these officials as unlikely, with 24% who say they are Not At All Likely. Fourteen percent (14%) are undecided.

    And for the President's job approval over the last week:

    • Strongly Approve: 36% (+2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 42% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 49% (+2)
    • Total Disapprove: 50% (-1)

    And over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 35%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 42%
    • Total Approve: 49%
    • Total Disapprove: 50%
By Doug64
#15044888
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-eight percent (38%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending October 17.

    Biden still has the support of 35% of Likely Democratic Voters. Sanders now earns 19% of the Democratic vote, while Warren has 18% support. This compares to 14% and 15% respectively in mid-September; Biden’s level of support hasn’t changed over the past month.

    42% of all Likely U.S. Voters think Pelosi is doing a worse job than most House speakers. Twenty-nine percent (29%) say the San Francisco Democrat is doing a better job, while 22% rate her performance as about the same as most of her predecessors in the job.

    63% of Likely Republican Voters think the GOP should be more like Trump than like Romney. Thirty percent (30%) say the GOP should be more like the freshman senator from Utah.

    Two-out of-three Likely U.S. Voters (67%) still think most Americans are not informed voters, although that’s down from a high of 83% in 2014. Just 21% disagree, a figure that’s been creeping up in annual surveys from nine percent (9%) five years ago. Twelve percent (12%) are undecided.

    32% of American Adults believe drug companies are most responsible for the opioid epidemic in America. But 55% don’t blame the drug companies first, with 23% who think the doctors who prescribe the drugs are most responsible and another 32% who say the person who uses them is most at fault. Thirteen percent (13%) are undecided.

    22% of Likely U.S. Voters think U.S. taxpayers are getting a good return on their investment in foreign aid. Fifty-two percent (52%) say taxpayers are not getting a good return, while 26% are undecided.

    59% of Likely U.S. Voters now agree with former President Ronald Reagan that “government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem.” Just 26% disagree with the statement from Reagan’s first inaugural address in 1981. Sixteen percent (16%) are undecided. This 59% ties the high recorded in 2008 when Rasmussen Reports first asked this question. A low of 52% still shared this view two years ago.

    And for the President's job approval over the last week:

    • Strongly Approve: 32% (-4)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 45% (+3)
    • Total Approve: 44% (-5)
    • Total Disapprove: 54% (+4)

    And over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 34% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 47% (-2)
    • Total Disapprove: 51% (+1)
By Doug64
#15046193
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-five percent (35%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending October 24. This week’s finding is down three points from a week ago. By comparison, this number ran in the mid- to upper 20s for much of 2016, President Obama's last full year in office.

    36% of all Likely U.S. Voters think Trump’s views are closest to their own when it comes to the major issues facing the country. Forty-two percent (42%) say their views are more in sync with the average Democratic member of Congress. Just 11% say that of congressional Republicans. Another 11% are not sure. This marks little change from January. Looking closer, we see that 61% of Likely Republican Voters think Trump’s views are closer to their own. Twenty percent (20%) identify more with the average Republican member of Congress, while nine percent (9%) feel closest to the average Democrat. Seventy-three percent (73%) of Democrats say the views of the average Democrat in Congress are more like theirs. But 17% of voters in the opposition party say they think more like Trump, up from 12% at the start of the year. Unaffiliated voters are by far the most likely to be undecided.

    38% of Likely U.S. Voters say they are likely to vote for someone other than President Trump or the Democratic presidential nominee in next year’s election. That includes 22% who are Very Likely to do so. Twenty-nine percent (29%) of Democrats say they are Very Likely to vote for a third-party candidate, compared to 14% of Republicans and 21% of voters not affiliated with either major party.

    18% of American Adults now consider themselves poor. Twenty percent (20%) felt that way in 2016, President Obama's final full year in office, but that finding had dropped to 13% a year ago. Fifty-eight percent (58%) describe themselves as middle-class, little changed from past surveying, with another 17% who say they are upper middle class. Only four percent (4%) see themselves as wealthy. Thirty-four percent (34%) of Americans say their personal financial assets have gone up since President Trump’s election in November 2016. Twenty-three percent (23%) say their assets have gone down, while 36% say they’ve stayed about the same.

    30% of American Adults think most Americans consider teaching a desirable profession to go into, basically unchanged from past surveying. 42% disagree, although that’s down from a high of 52% in early 2012. A sizable 28% are not sure.

    59% of all Likely U.S. Voters believe the United States and its allies are winning the war against ISIS. Just 13% think ISIS is winning, while 17% say neither side is ahead. Eleven percent (11%) are not sure.

    49% of Likely U.S. Voters think their taxes are more likely to go up if the Democratic presidential nominee defeats President Trump next year. Only 15% say taxes are more likely to go down, while 29% expect them to remain about the same. If Trump is reelected, 33% say taxes are likely to go up, while 17% predict they would go down. Forty-two percent (42%) think they would remain about the same.

    60% of Likely U.S. Voters who are now in the military or have served in the past see Trump as a stronger commander in chief than most recent presidents. That’s up from 53% in June of last year when we first asked this question. Thirty-four percent (34%) of these voters say he’s a weaker commander. Only five percent (5%) rate his performance as about the same as most of those who’ve recently been president.

    And for the President's job approval over the last week:

    • Strongly Approve: 32%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 45%
    • Total Approve: 46% (+2)
    • Total Disapprove: 53% (-1)

    And over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 34%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43%
    • Total Approve: 46% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 52% (+1)
User avatar
By Drlee
#15046218
Here is another example of how Rasmussen distorts their findings.

In a week where the congress voted essentially to move inexorably toward impeachment they do not even mention it. This despite the fact that at least 4 other polls have the majority of Americans favoring impeachment and just under 50% wanting him removed from office. (This is much higher than the polls when Nixon was forced to resign. And Rasmussen? Crickets.
By Doug64
#15046821
Drlee wrote:Here is another example of how Rasmussen distorts their findings.

In a week where the congress voted essentially to move inexorably toward impeachment they do not even mention it. This despite the fact that at least 4 other polls have the majority of Americans favoring impeachment and just under 50% wanting him removed from office. (This is much higher than the polls when Nixon was forced to resign. And Rasmussen? Crickets.

Rasmussen released their own poll on impeachment yesterday, it'll be in this weekend's list.
By Doug64
#15047614
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-six percent (36%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending October 31.

    Voters in general are evenly divided on the legitimacy of the House’s impeachment inquiry. Forty-five percent (45%) of all Likely Voters say it’s a fair and impartial judicial process, but 46% think it’s a partisan political effort by Democrats. No surprise, 63% of Democrats believe it’s fair and impartial; 70% of Republicans say it’s a partisan political effort. Unaffiliateds are almost evenly divided.

    54% of Likely U.S. Voters believe the federal government does too little to fight global warming. Just 16% think it does too much, while 23% consider the level of government action about right. These findings have held steady in surveys for the past several years. The continuing problem for those who propose spending billions of dollars to combat climate change is that voters apparently aren’t worried enough to fund such actions. Forty percent (40%) are not willing to pay any more in taxes and utility costs each year to generate clean energy and fight global warming, a figure that peaked at 48% in 2014. Another 22% are only willing to spend $100 more a year. Fourteen percent (14%) would be okay with spending $300 more a year, while seven percent (7%) are willing to spend an additional $500 annually. Nine percent (9%) would spend another $1,000 or more in taxes and higher utility costs each year.

    New York City yesterday voted to become the largest city with ranked-choice voting in which voters choose not just their first choice but several candidates in order of preference. The second-choice votes help pick a winner if no candidate earns more than 50% of the vote. But voters nationwide aren’t thrilled by the idea. Just 31% of Likely U.S. Voters favor ranked-choice voting in their local elections. Forty-eight percent (48%) are opposed, while 21% are not sure.

    The president earned a monthly job approval of 46% in October, down two points from 48% in September. In January of this year, Trump’s monthly job approval had fallen to 44%, its lowest level in a year. But it jumped five points to 49% in February following his well-received State of the Union speech, recapturing the high ground he held for most of 2018. Fifty-two percent (52%) disapproved of the president’s job performance last month, up two points from the month before.

    48% of Likely U.S. Voters still believe President Trump won the 2016 presidential election fairly, but that’s down from 55% in April 2017 shortly after the new president took office. Forty percent (40%) say he did not win fairly, up from 33%. Twelve percent (12%) are undecided.

    67% of Likely U.S. Voters now think the drug cartels are more powerful than the government in Mexico. Just 13% disagree, while 20% are not sure. Sixty-three percent (63%) say it’s likely the drug-related violence in Mexico will spill over into the United States, with 29% who think it’s Very Likely. The overall finding is down, however, from a high of 82% 10 years ago and 73% in 2013. Sixty-six percent (66%) of voters believe that if drug violence continues to escalate along the Mexican border, the military should be used to protect American citizens. Only 23% oppose use of the U.S. military along the border. Eleven percent (11%) are undecided. Support for use of the military to keep out Mexican drug violence has ranged from 58% to 79% in surveys since early 2009.

    29% of American Adults favor allowing transgender students to participate on the sports teams of the gender they identify with, letting biological males, for example, play girls’ sports. Fifty-one percent (51%) oppose transgender participation on sports teams of the opposite sex. Twenty percent (20%) are undecided.

    And for the President's job approval over the last week:

    • Strongly Approve: 35% (+3)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43% (-2)
    • Total Approve: 47% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 52% (-1)

    And over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 34%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43%
    • Total Approve: 46%
    • Total Disapprove: 52%
By Hindsite
#15047618
Drlee wrote:Here is another example of how Rasmussen distorts their findings.

In a week where the congress voted essentially to move inexorably toward impeachment they do not even mention it. This despite the fact that at least 4 other polls have the majority of Americans favoring impeachment and just under 50% wanting him removed from office. (This is much higher than the polls when Nixon was forced to resign. And Rasmussen? Crickets.

Those polls don't mean crap, because Trump is not Nixon and Trump will not resign.
Praise the Lord.
By Doug64
#15049168
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-nine percent (39%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending November 7.

    51% of American Adults rate Veterans Day, celebrated today, as one of our nation’s most important holidays. Only six percent (6%) consider it one of the least important, while 40% view it as somewhere in between.

    Billionaire Michael Bloomberg has a way to go if he wants to claim next year’s Democratic presidential nomination. Rasmussen Reports matched Bloomberg against the three current Democratic front-runners, and just 10% of Likely Democratic Voters think the former Republican New York City mayor would make the better candidate against President Trump in 2020. The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds former Vice President Joe Biden leading the pack of four with 39% of the Democratic vote. Avowed socialist Bernie Sanders, a U.S. senator from Vermont, gets 23%, followed by Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren, another big government advocate, with 19%. Ten percent (10%) are undecided.

    38% of Likely Democratic Voters believe American society is generally fair and decent. Fifty-one percent (51%) say it’s unfair and discriminatory. by comparison, 74% of Republicans and unaffiliated voters by a 49% to 36% margin view American society as fair and decent.

    39% of Likely U.S. Voters now support a plan to extend Medicare, the federal health insurance program for people 65 and older, to Americans of all ages. Forty-six percent (46%) oppose Medicare for all. This compares to 44% and 41% two months ago, the highest level of support to date. Fifteen percent (15%) remain undecided.

    Fifty-three percent (53%) of Likely U.S. Voters think most reporters are trying to help impeach President Trump when they write or talk about the impeachment effort. Just 32% believe most reporters are simply interested in reporting the news in an unbiased manner. Eight percent (8%) say most are trying to block Trump’s impeachment.

    44% of all American Adults believe the job market is better than it was a year ago. That’s consistent with findings over the past 18 months and up from the teens and 20s during the Obama years. Just 19% think the job market’s worse now. Thirty percent (30%) say things are about the same as they were a year ago.

    As overall confidence in the economy continues to hover near record highs, Americans are now feeling it in their wallets as well with sentiments on their own personal finances and anticipated spending shattering previous highs. The Rasmussen Reports Economic Index hit 143.1 in November, up four points from last month and just one point shy of the five-year peak.

    And for the President's job approval over the last week:

    • Strongly Approve: 34% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43%
    • Total Approve: 47%
    • Total Disapprove: 52%

    And over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 34%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43%
    • Total Approve: 46%
    • Total Disapprove: 52%
By Doug64
#15050722
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-nine percent (39%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending November 14.

    18% of Likely U.S. Voters think Trump will be impeached before serving his full term in office. Seventeen percent (17%) felt that way in September, down from a high of 29% when Rasmussen Reports first asked this question in late December 2017.

    84% of American Adults are proud to be an American. Just nine percent (9%) are not. These findings have held steady in surveys for the past several years.

    29% of Likely U.S. Voters think the United States should be doing more to support the pro-democracy protestors in Hong Kong. Thirty-four percent (34%) oppose more U.S. involvement, while 37% are undecided.

    56% of American Adults use an online streaming service to watch TV and movies. That’s up from 45% in 2015 and 54% two years ago.

    53% of Likely U.S. Voters are concerned that Trump’s impeachment and removal from office will lead to violence, with 24% who are Very Concerned. But 59% are concerned that those opposed to Trump’s policies will resort to violence, including 34% who are Very Concerned. These findings are unchanged from June of last year.

    61% of Likely U.S. Voters still believe most politicians these days are more interested in campaigning on what divides us rather than on what brings us together. Just 21% say most are more interested in bringing us together. That compares to 78% and 11%, though, during the last year's heated midterm elections. Eighteen percent (18%) are not sure.

    Ninety-two percent (92%) of Likely U.S. Voters think a president’s Cabinet choices are important to the success of his administration, with 63% who say they are Very Important. These views have changed very little in surveys since October 2008. But just 24% believe Trump relies on his Cabinet about the same as those who have served in the White House before him. Fifty-two percent (52%) say the current president relies less on his Cabinet than most of his predecessors. Only 15% think he relies on his Cabinet more. These findings, too, are virtually unchanged since Rasmussen Reports first asked this question in March of last year.

    And for the President's job approval over the last week:

    • Strongly Approve: 36% (+2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 44% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 48% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 51% (-1)

    And over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 34%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 44% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 46%
    • Total Disapprove: 52%
By Doug64
#15052149
I hope everyone in the US and our far-flung bases had a Happy (and safe) Thanksgiving. Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-eight percent (38%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending November 21.

    69% of all Likely U.S. Voters rate a free-market economic system as better than socialism. Just 12% think socialism is a better economic system, but 18% are undecided. A closer look, however, finds that while 87% of Republicans and 69% of voters not affiliated with either major party see a free-market system as better, just 53% of Democrats agree. Twenty-one percent (21%) of Democrats like socialism better, with a sizable 25% not sure.

    66% of Likely U.S. Voters oppose repealing the Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution which guarantees Americans’ right to bear arms. Twenty-four percent (24%) favor repeal, while 10% are undecided. In April 2018 when retired U.S. Supreme Court Justic John Paul Stevens proposed repeal of the Second Amendment in a widely-discussed op-ed article in The New York Times, 56% of Americans were opposed. Sixty percent (60%) felt that way in mid-September of this year. Support for repeal peaked at 29%. But 49% of voters support legislation that would ban private ownership of “assault-style” rifles, although that’s down from a high of 54% in June 2015. Forty-three percent (43%) oppose banning ownership of these weapons by private individuals.

    39% of Likely U.S. Voters continue to believe the new trade agreement with Mexico and Canada will be better for the United States than the North American Free Trade Agreement, known as NAFTA. Twenty-five percent (25%) think the new deal will be worse for our country, while 20% expect its impact to be about the same. Seventeen percent (17%) are not sure. But now just 47% of voters think Congress is likely to approve the new trade agreement, with 13% who say it’s Very Likely. This compares to 65% and 24% respectively in December. Thirty-seven percent (37%) consider congressional approval unlikely, although only 10% say it’s Not At All Likely. Sixteen percent (16%) are undecided.

    44% of American Adults still rank Thanksgiving as one of our nation’s most important holidays, down from a high of 49% last year but generally in keeping with annual surveys since 2006. Only eight percent (8%) view today’s holiday as one of the least important, while 43% rate it somewhere in between. Christmas and July 4 have long been the two highest regarded holidays, but Thanksgiving has now falling from third place to rank behind Memorial Day and Veterans Day in importance to Americans. Little changed from past years, however, are the 83% who say they have a lot to be thankful for this Thanksgiving. Just eight percent (8%) do not, while nine percent (9%) are undecided.

    76% of Likely U.S. Voters have been closely following the recent House impeachment hearings, with 44% who say they are following Very Closely. These findings have changed little from the end of the first week of the hearings in mid-November. Republicans (49%) are more likely to be following Very Closely than Democrats (42%) and voters not affiliated with either major party (40%). This is an interesting change from two weeks ago, though, when Democrats (50%) were much more likely to be following Very Closely than Republicans (36%) and unaffiliateds (37%).

    And for the President's job approval over the last week (only two days thanks to the holiday):

    • Strongly Approve: 36%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 45% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 45% (-3)
    • Total Disapprove: 54% (+3)

    And over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 34%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 44%
    • Total Approve: 47% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 52%
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