ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi killed in US raid in Syria near Turkish border - Politics Forum.org | PoFo

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#15044968
This is most welcome to Trump after the fiasco in the Kurdish border region with Turkey. He made Bagdhadi's killing look more important than the killing of bin Laden so as not to be outdone by Obama, which is pathetic.

Bagdhadi was the religious leader of the caliphate who only had one public appearance in Mossul many years ago. I don't believe that he had any operational capacity. His nominated successor has been in charge of the operational aspects all along. Thus, I don't believe this will greatly impact ISIS' capacity to continue acts of terror.

Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi killed in US raid, Trump confirms

The Islamic State leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, has been killed in a raid by US special forces on his Syrian safe house, Donald Trump has announced, ending a years-long hunt for one of the world’s most-wanted terrorists.

Trump said the “impeccable” two-hour operation was conducted on Saturday night in the province of Idlib, one of the few areas of the country still outside Syrian regime control, and that US officials had confirmed Baghdadi, 48, was among those killed.

“US special operations forces executed a dangerous and daring night-time raid in north-west Syria and accomplished their mission in grand style,” he said.

The US president, facing impeachment proceedings and under bipartisan fire for withdrawing troops from the Syrian border, basked in the demise of the self-styled caliphate leader, whose final moments he described in vivid, indulgent detail.

“[Baghdadi] running into a dead-end tunnel, whimpering and crying and screaming all the way,” Trump said.

Cornered, Baghdadi detonated a suicide vest and killed himself and three of his children, Trump said. “He died like a dog, he died like a coward. The world is now a much safer place,” he said.

World leaders welcomed the news of Baghdadi’s death but also struck notes of caution. Boris Johnson, the British prime minister, said: “The death of Baghdadi is an important moment in our fight against terror but the battle against the evil of Daesh [Isis] is not yet over.”

Trump said US forces were engaged with “massive firepower” as their helicopters arrived at the building where Baghdadi was sheltering with his family and associates.

“The compound had to be cleared at this time, with people either surrendering or being shot and killed,” he said. “Eleven young children were moved out of the house and are uninjured.

“The only ones remaining were Baghdadi in the tunnel, and he had dragged three of his young children with him. They were led to a certain death. He reached the end of the tunnel as our dogs chased him down.

“[Baghdadi] ignited his vest, killing himself and the three children. Test results gave certain, immediate and totally positive identification. It was him.”

The US president had presaged the news of Baghdadi’s death in characteristic style, inviting speculation by tweeting at 9.23pm on Saturday in Washington DC: “Something very big has just happened!”

Iraqi officials told the Guardian the hunt for Baghdadi had intensified over the past month since they identified a Syrian man who had moved his family members and wives from Iraq to Syria.

An Iraqi intelligence official said the wives of Baghdadi’s two brothers, Jumah and Ahmad, along with other family members, were monitored as they moved to the region. The information was passed to the CIA earlier this month, the officials said.


He was killed in the village Barisha in Idlib province in Syria only about 5 miles from the Turkish border. The area is held by Hayat Tahrir al-Sham (HTS), a rival rebel group that has previously clashed with ISIS.



There are TAF (Turkish Armed Forces) controlled settlements to the north of the village where he was killed. There are also pockets of Turkistan Islamic Party (TIP) in the area. Which makes it a bit of a mystery what he was doing there. Was he trying to escape to Turkey?

Apparently the intelligence that led to his capture came primarily from SDF and Iraqi sources. Turkey, Russia and Syria were informed of the mission (probably without identifying its aims) so as not to draw fire from these state parties. It seems that the helicopters came under fire from non-state groups.

Trump's description of Bagdhadi "whimpering and crying and screaming all the way" isn't very credible of a terrorist about to detonate a suicide vest. We'll never find out because we can count on the Americans not to release the video footage.

As long as the imperialist powers are determined to use terrorists groups to pursue their geopolitical aims, terrorists of all colors will have a brilliant future.


Edit: The US forces involved in the mission apparently started from different places in Iraq even though the US base in Turkey is much closer. Did they not trust the Turks?
#15044971
Confirmation of what I wrote above. ISIS already has a new leader.

ISIS ALREADY HAS A NEW LEADER, BUT BAGHDADI MAY NOT HAVE BEEN RUNNING THE GROUP ANYWAY

Back-to-back U.S. operations Saturday and Sunday have resulted in the deaths of Islamic State militant group (ISIS) leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi and spokesperson Abu al-Hassan al-Muhajir in Syria, but the organization has already designated a successor, Newsweek has learned.

Abdullah Qardash, sometimes spelled Karshesh and also known as Hajji Abdullah al-Afari, was said to have been nominated by Baghdadi in August to run the group's "Muslim affairs" in a widely-circulated statement attributed to ISIS' official Amaq news outlet, but never publicly endorsed by the group. Though little is known about the former Iraqi military officer who once served under late leader Saddam Hussein, one regional intelligence official asking not to be identified by name or nation told Newsweek that Qardash would have taken over Baghdadi's role—though it had lost much of its significance by the time of his demise.

Baghdadi, who died after detonating a suicide vest following a Delta Team operation first reported by Newsweek, built ISIS' self-styled caliphate out of Al-Qaeda's Iraqi branch, but the official said that the influential hard-line cleric's role had become largely symbolic.

"Baghdadi was a figurehead. He was not involved in operations or day-to-day," the official told Newsweek. "All Baghdadi did was say yes or no—no planning."

Details are still emerging as to what transpired at Baghdadi's compound in Barisha village and why the ISIS chief was hiding out deep in territory more commonly associated with rival jihadi group Hayat Tahrir al-Sham, led by former Baghdadi associate Abu Mohammed al-Jolani, who went on to built Al-Qaeda's Syria branch, Nusra Front. Both men's forces, however, have faced consecutive defeats, severely limiting their freedom of movement across two nations they played key roles in destabilizing.

The pair had taken advantage of the unrest resulting from the 2003 U.S. invasion of Iraq that overthrew Hussein to establish a powerful militant network. Jolani ultimately refused to merge his Syrian group with Baghdadi's as the latter spread there, capitalizing on a civil war that erupted in 2011 as the U.S., Turkey and other regional powers backed a rebel and jihadi uprising against Syrian President Bashar al-Assad.

As ISIS came to dominate both in Iraq and Syria, however, the U.S. gathered an international coalition in 2014 to begin bombing the group in both countries. Iran also mobilized its own forces, along with allied regional militias, to back the Iraqi and Syrian governments against militant advances.

By 2015, Russia entered the fight in Syria and the U.S. had gradually begun to ditch the increasingly Islamist opposition in favor of a third faction, the Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces. The Syrian government and Syrian Democratic Forces then waged rival campaigns to defeat ISIS, but Baghdadi continued to elude local and international powers.

While President Donald Trump was the first world leader to explicitly claim the death of Baghdadi, various U.S. and international officials have offered conflicting reports as to his fate and whereabouts in recent years, many times placing him in the Jazeera region in northeastern Syria and eastern Iraq and claiming he had been left unable to lead ISIS due to wounds sustained in an airstrike.

When Baghdadi was seen in a video released in April—his first appearance since making his sole public speech at Mosul's Grand al-Nuri Mosque—there were no visible signs of injury. Even with his demise, however, his group's infamous capacity to both order and inspire global bloodshed may not be entirely degraded.

"They will hit Syria, the chaos of Iraq, Europe and definitely the United States," the regional official told Newsweek. You have a hit a sleeping giant, it will wake up and cause unforeseeable chaos and wreak havoc on the Western civilians."

One former U.S. intelligence official, however, argued that Baghdadi's death may have some tangible effect on the group's ability to operate, telling Newsweek that "if he is signing off on operations and strategy via letter and courier then he has an impact."

"The leader matters," the former official said. "Candidly, we go after senior leaders, because they make decisions."

Trump has ordered the withdrawal of U.S. forces from northeastern Syria, leading the Syrian Democratic Forces to strike a deal with the Syrian government, whose ally Russia, has reached an agreement to halt a Turkish-led attack on Kurdish fighters near the border. The president has, however, deployed additional U.S. troops to secure oil fields in eastern Syria.


#15044986
According to the NY Times, the mission for taking out Bagdhadi went ahead despite Trump and not because of him. Apparently, intelligence had spotted Bagdhadi in the summer and had meticulous plans for taking him out. When Trump decided to pull US Trumps from Syria, the plans were thrown into disarray and they had to carry out a risky night opeation.

Al-Baghdadi’s Death Came Despite Trump’s Actions, Military Officials Say
#15044992
Atlantis wrote:According to the NY Times, the mission for taking out Bagdhadi went ahead despite Trump and not because of him. Apparently, intelligence had spotted Bagdhadi in the summer and had meticulous plans for taking him out. When Trump decided to pull US Trumps from Syria, the plans were thrown into disarray and they had to carry out a risky night opeation.

Al-Baghdadi’s Death Came Despite Trump’s Actions, Military Officials Say


The NY Times would say that, of course. The constant never giving credit to Trump for anything strategy of the Liberal wing of the Establishment is going to bite them in the ass in 2020, I suspect.
#15045011
annatar1914 wrote:The NY Times would say that, of course. The constant never giving credit to Trump for anything strategy of the Liberal wing of the Establishment is going to bite them in the ass in 2020, I suspect.

Most know, of course, that the NY Times is run by human liberal scum. I prefer to get my facts from the White House press secretary: The White House press secretary, Stephanie Grisham, confirmed Trump’s response: “I worked with John Kelly, and he was totally unequipped to handle the genius of our great President.”
#15045019
Most know, of course, that the NY Times is run by human liberal scum.


Unironically, I agree. But you forgot to add; '' Shill presstitutes for the Elite Capitalists, human liberal scum'' to be truly accurate.



I prefer to get my facts from the White House press secretary: The White House press secretary, Stephanie Grisham, confirmed Trump’s response: “I worked with John Kelly, and he was totally unequipped to handle the genius of our great President.”


Loyalty is a great thing. But President Trump really is a genius; he's got you and others talking about him 24/7 365 days a year, for absolutely nothing, lol :lol: :lol: :lol: ! Meanwhile, Liberalism and the Capitalist system as a whole blunders from crisis to greater and greater crisis while the working people pathetically find the only man who even bothers truly talking about them on the US political scene (in addition to talking about himself) is 'Orange Man Bad', a Capitalist Plutocrat :lol:
#15045048
annatar1914 wrote:The NY Times would say that, of course. The constant never giving credit to Trump for anything strategy of the Liberal wing of the Establishment is going to bite them in the ass in 2020, I suspect.


The NY Times merely confirms the obvious, namely, that the willingness to cooperate decreases when you stab somebody in the back.

It's always amusing to witness the mental gymnastics Trumpets have to perform to avoid the obvious.

Sivad wrote:You get your "facts" from whoever's telling you what you want to hear.


Classic case of projection.
#15045059
Here is what is left of the compound where Bagdhadi was hiding. The destruction is too massive for a suicide vest. So I guess the Americans bombed the place after the raid to destroy all evidence.

Image

The village of Barisha was apparently controlled by Hurras Ad Din, a pro Al Qaeda group, and not by HTS, which controls this region of Idlib. The compound was owned by a Hurras Ad Din supporter who rented it to Bagdhadi.

From the bent in the road it looks like the last compound on this road a few hundred meters from the village in this Google map:

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Baris ... 36.6390794
#15045112
The NY Times merely confirms the obvious, namely, that the willingness to cooperate decreases when you stab somebody in the back.


Rhetoric, not facts, is what you come back at me with. The NY Times couldn't ''confirm the obvious'' if the lives of their ''journalists'' depended on it.

It's always amusing to witness the mental gymnastics Trumpets have to perform to avoid the obvious.


What's even more amusing is that you can't tell what is so ''obvious'' about this whole situation that renders you incapable of admitting objective facts. And, that you're oblivious to the obvious criticism of your position on this issue, coming from someone such as myself who is anything but a ''Trumpet'' :lol: :roll:
#15045114
Atlantis wrote:Two presidents, two pictures. The contrast couldn't be bigger.

Image

Image


Yeah, first picture the President at the time looks like he's the guy getting coffee orders from Clinton and her crew; could you honestly say, if you were a time traveler or an Alien from another world, that you knew who the leader was in that picture? The second picture of the President with the military leadership look serious and professional.
#15045130
Beren wrote:The first picture is spontaneous while the second one is clearly staged, aliens from another world would definitely see that. Obama was late, I guess, and didn't mean to be in charge, of course.


The 2nd picture looks staged. Trump puts himself in the center with his henchmen aligned on both sides. There is a picture of Saddam Hussein surrounded by his generals which looks exactly like that. Maybe that's why @annatar1914 likes it so much. Trump pushes everybody aside just to be at center stage. But he even fails at that because the US coat of arms behind Trump introduces a slight asymmetry into the picture, which destroys the whole balance.

Compared to the pompous self-staging so typical of Trump, in the first picture, all the focus is on the event taking place outside the picture frame. This builds tension as in a renaissance painting. The focus here are the operatives who put their lives on the line for the success of the operation. Trump, by comparison, is prepared to sacrifice his people for a PR stunt.
#15045133
Atlantis wrote:The 2nd picture looks staged. Trump puts himself in the center with his henchmen aligned on both sides. There is a picture of Saddam Hussein surrounded by his generals which looks exactly like that. Maybe that's why @annatar1914 likes it so much. Trump pushes everybody aside just to be at center stage. But he even fails at that because the US coat of arms behind Trump introduces a slight asymmetry into the picture, which destroys the whole balance.

Compared to the pompous self-staging so typical of Trump, in the first picture, all the focus is on the event taking place outside the picture frame. This builds tension as in a renaissance painting. The focus here are the operatives who put their lives on the line for the success of the operation. Trump, by comparison, is prepared to sacrifice his people for a PR stunt.

The second picture doesn't deserve much analysis, but I wonder if whom aliens from another world would find the most senior figure in the first picture. If they're like us, it would most likely be the bald guy wearing dark suit and blue tie.
#15045135
Beren wrote:The second picture doesn't deserve much analysis, but I wonder if whom aliens from another world would find the most senior figure in the first picture. If they're like us, it would most likely be the bald guy wearing dark suit and blue tie.

No, anyone unfamiliar with the American political system would naturally assume it was the military guy seated to the right of Obama - the uniform, the decorations, being seated in the centre of the frame, the serious expression: he must be in charge. Lol.
#15045136
Potemkin wrote:No, anyone unfamiliar with the American political system would naturally assume it was the military guy seated to the right of Obama - the uniform, the decorations, being seated in the centre of the frame, the serious expression: he must be in charge. Lol.

He must be in charge, but it doesn't mean he's the most senior figure in the room.
#15045139
Beren wrote:He must be in charge, but it doesn't mean he's the most senior figure in the room.

I see what you did there. But that would be true every time the US President steps into an elevator with a human operator - the guy operating the elevator can order the US President around so long as he is using the elevator. The same is true for that operations room. :)
#15045142
Potemkin wrote:I see what you did there. But that would be true every time the US President steps into an elevator with a human operator - the guy operating the elevator can order the US President around so long as he is using the elevator. The same is true for that operations room. :)

I don't think the decorated guy at the head of the table told Obama or anyone else where to sit. However, most people unfamiliar with personalities in US politics would say the bald guy wearing dark suit and blue tie is the president, I wonder though what aliens from another world would say.
#15045144
Sigh.

We got the important information from the Kurds, and our alliance with them provided other support.

While the Kurds continued to help, even after we stabbed them in the back, they're gone now. If we need to fight ISIS in the future, we're on our own. And it will be much, much harder.

Speaking of betrayal, I've seen a number of Kurds talking about it, which makes some comments I saw here pretty silly.

If you want to get into this in depth:

https://www.nybooks.com/articles/2019/1 ... the-kurds/

The weird thing is us acting like mercenaries protecting Syrian oil fields. We don't have a relationship with Syria, and there's been no comment on what we are getting in return. Perhaps an option to build a Trump tower when things settle down.
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