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Provision of the two UN HDI indicators other than GNP.
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By jimjam
#15055508
“Alzheimer’s disease, the most common form of dementia, affects 62% of people diagnosed with dementia,” said Brennan. “But the good news is that 30% of all cases of Alzheimer’s disease are attributable to seven modifiable risk factors.”

These risk factors are low levels of educational attainment or mental stimulation, low levels of physical activity, mid-life high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, mid-life obesity, depression and smoking.

also

Metformin, a cheap drug already commonly prescribed for pre-diabetics and diabetics, is being studied to prove that it slows cell ageing so dramatically that those who take it can expect to live decades longer, in near-perfect health.

Metformin has already been shown in a number of separate clinical trials to slow the development of most age-related diseases, including all cancers, Alzheimer’s and heart disease. To put it another way the drug slows the ageing process. It makes cells and tissues “younger”.
By late
#15055516
I've used Metformin, it's not what you're looking for, at least not yet.

Developing an effective regimen with it is going to take a while.
User avatar
By Drlee
#15055525
I have no particular knowledge on this subject but...

People often guess my age as younger than my years by about a decade or sometimes more. How to stay young.

Everyone says exercise and I agree with that. In addition to cardio I think moderate weight training is important too. Most geezers can't lift shit so it really slows them down.

Controlling weight is a moderate deal too.

Controlling blood pressure is HUGE. Much dementia is caused by a series of mini-strokes.

Controlling cholesterol. I take a mild statin and it is working quite well.

And this beyond everything. Be around young people. Often. Work with them. Smart ones. I work in a clinic where young pre-med and med students work and they charge my battery. I teach at the local University and that helps too. Don't be a geezer. Don't just be among them be with them. Listen to their music. Eat their food and discuss what is important to them. And new flash. They are not even mildly interested in your fiber intake or your prostate. (And avoid fellow geezers who discuss this shit too. They are harshing your buzz.)

The other day I had some med school students in my car going to lunch. One of them looked at me and asked: "Who listens to the Jesse J, Taylor Swift, 21 pilots and Ed Sheerhan music?" When I answered that it was me, they were amazed. (I draw the line at Hip Hop.)

The old saying that "age is just a state of mind" is bullshit. It hurts to get old. But if that old saying was "youth is a state of mind" I would agree. I am, by far and away, the youngest pushing 70 person I know.
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By jimjam
#15055587
Drlee wrote:People often guess my age as younger than my years by about a decade or sometimes more.

I have the same experience. Usually pumps my ego up for the rest of the day.

Drlee wrote:Everyone says exercise and I agree with that. In addition to cardio I think moderate weight training is important too. Most geezers can't lift shit so it really slows them down.


I recently injured my L4 and went to 4 doctors and a chiropractor. No Offense but it was the chiropractor who impressed me most. She was super smart and made the comment after I told her that I had been running, sprinting or jogging for 60 years that, "That's likely what's been holding you together." And …. a few years ago I incorporated 15 lb weights into my daily workout so that I could, simply, carry things. A big help.

Drlee wrote:Controlling weight is a moderate deal too.


If I gain one pound I get pissed off.

Drlee wrote:Controlling blood pressure is HUGE. Much dementia is caused by a series of mini-strokes.


Always have had good BP and a pulse around 47. Three years ago I started having complex partial seizures. (presently under control with briviact). Initially it was like a bomb went off in my head and wiped out much memory. I had great fear of dementia but after watching closely for 3 years this does not seem the case. For one thing, if someone ques me in about a "lost" memory, it comes back. It is my understanding that with dementia, nothing comes back.

Drlee wrote: Be around young people


I need to do this more but I have said that young people may look at old people but they do not see them. You are lucky. Interacting with them is part of your job.

Drlee wrote:avoid fellow geezers who discuss this shit too


I live in Maine and Florida. The Florida part forces me to be around geezers. Topic #1? Pills, pains and poop. It is terrible.

OK Drlee, if you have got this far you may now bill Medicare $800 :lol: . Thank you for your thoughts.
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By Drlee
#15055613
I could if I wasn't a community health guy.

I am fine with Chiropractors. I have lots of friends who use them to great advantage. My personal doc a few years ago was a DO (Osteopath.) Their training is a mix of osteopathic and allopathic medicine. You may already know that DO's take the same boards as MD's. Most of the time a patient would not know the difference but some of them are very much into a more holistic approach to medicine. My back started bothering me and he did some manipulation that gave me almost immediate relief. Unfortunately I spoke too enthusiastically about the US Public Health Service and he joined. New doc is an internist who was a civil engineer before going to medical school. He is a superb doctor.

If you want to see something very interesting look at the "Stanford Mini Medical School". It is a bedside guide for physicians. It is fascinating and you will learn a great deal from it. You don't have to watch the uber technical stuff where they talk about Stem Cells and Tissue Regeneration but the one on Influenza will make you get a flu shot every year.
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By Godstud
#15055616
All you need.
Image

:lol:

Also, apparently, 48% of the problems associated with old age, can be prevented by weight training.

Obesity is a HUGE factor in reducing your lifespan, and your enjoyment of life, overall.
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By Stormsmith
#15055805
Just saw a news item on preventing Alzheimer’s. People riding stationary bikes while watching, by way of a video headset, a fairly complex virtual road map which they were asked to memorize. They did this 45 minutes 3 times a week. Subjects range from 50 to 85 years old

That's it.

It breaks down to combining physical fitness with brain stimulation. Years ago, it was noted that people who learned the London road map and qualified for a taxi drivers licence had a noticeable or maybe I mean measurable increase in brain size. I expect it wouldn't matter a whit lf you substituted memorizing opera for mapping. Just learn new stuff. Pump up the hippocampus.

I think games like chess and spider solitaire are good too.


I recently saw a youtube of 93 year old Dick Van Dyke dancing for his role in a role for the remake of Mary Poppins returns. I want that for me. To dance as lively at 93 as I could at 23
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By Godstud
#15055840
Reading is excellent mental stimulation, and I think a lot more people should do it.
Doing any sort of physical activity is also very good. Once you stop moving, that's it for you!

Stop smoking.

Stop drinking too much.

Be in a relationship someone younger than yourself. laugh, but it's proven that being in a relationship to someone younger than yourself, helps you live longer. This might be similar to what @Drlee mentioned, about hanging out with people younger than yourself. :D
#15055844
My mom and dad read, swim every day and run. My mom recommends knitting, something about finger movement stimulating the brain. They watch YouTube videos about health and aging.

My mom uses anti aging skin creams. She got me addicted to St. Ives which is one reason why in my 30s, I can pass for 24. St. Ives tends to add in collagen. I want to try creams with hylaluronic acid.

@Drlee Jessie J is awesome! That is so cool that you appreciate her music. I like some hip hop. They have some in the step up movies.
Last edited by MistyTiger on 24 Dec 2019 00:44, edited 1 time in total.
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By Godstud
#15055846
I'm a fan of 21 Pilots, and others, too. :D I actually like a lot of the modern music and I am really tired of the old farts constantly playing sounds from the 70s. :O

Great music is still being made, today! Fuck sentimentality!

Acting like you are still alive is very important to staying alive.
#15055848
Godstud wrote:I'm a fan of 21 Pilots, and others, too. :D I actually like a lot of the modern music and I am really tired of the old farts constantly playing sounds from the 70s. :O

Great music is still being made, today! Fuck sentimentality!

Acting like you are still alive is very important to staying alive.


I do not mind music from the 70s and older. I appreciate the different lyrics and musical patterns.

I will always be sentimental, inherited that from my father. My mom is less sentimental. I appreciate some NSYNC, Five, and 98 Degrees, The Calling and others from the 90s and early 2000s. Music during my teens will always be special for me.

It is good to be alive.

I like reggaeton too, luis fonsi, daddy yankee, nicky jam etc.
User avatar
By Godstud
#15055851
:up: @MistyTiger

I am sure my playlists would stun some of the people on this forum, as I can go from 21 Pilots, Maroon 5, and Imagine Dragons, over to Volbeat, Five Finger Death Punch, and Disturbed, in the next. :D
#15055853
@Godstud

Re: Reading is excellent mental stimulation, and I think a lot more people should do it

Absolutely agree, but the case of the study, the memorisatìon was the important component, think of learning poetry.
Last edited by Stormsmith on 24 Dec 2019 01:14, edited 1 time in total.
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By MistyTiger
#15055854
Godstud wrote::up: @MistyTiger

I am sure my playlists would stun some of the people on this forum, as I can go from 21 Pilots, Maroon 5, and Imagine Dragons, over to Volbeat, Five Finger Death Punch, and Disturbed, in the next. :D


Haha nice.

I do not mind some Stone Sour and Slayer. I also enjoy some opera, musical theatre, Italian pop, old jazz, new jazz, and other non-english music. Sometimes English just cannot express some emotions well enough.
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By Godstud
#15055855
Oh, absolutely. I thoroughly enjoy some classical music I heard at the coffee shop, the other day. Most music is pretty good, and the old farts who think that all the best music has already been made, are just dumb. :D

Note: I do not consider anyone an old fart, unless they clearly demonstrate the traits associated with being one.
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By MistyTiger
#15055856
My dad is an old fart. LOL. But there is no return policy. :lol:

Kiddding of course. I would not dream of returning my dad anywhere.

I am probably the most openminded music listener of my family. I started with classical and baroque then moved on to many genres. I love the experiences.

If I can dance to it, I love it.
User avatar
By Ter
#15055857
I started to take a daily dose of metformin a couple of months ago and continue my baby aspirin...
I combated ageing this year with three surgeries, two cataract operations and removal of some skin growths.
Quite a relief, I can see like a twenty year old one again and I can stop worrying about my skin.
There is a lot of luck involved as well. Quite a few people I knew have not drawn lucky tickets...
User avatar
By ThirdTerm
#15055860
Image

The APOE gene is a risk factor for Alzheimer’s. 70% to 75% of people have APOE3, 15% to 20% have an APOE4 gene, and about 5% to 10% of people have an APOE2 gene. An abnormal protein called tau is associated with the destruction of brain cells in Alzheimer’s disease. The following study's findings suggest that the APOE3ch mutation may reduce the uptake of tau in brain cells. A Columbian woman’s mutation of her APOE gene is an unusual variant called APOE3Christchurch (APOE3ch), which may offer protection against Alzheimer’s disease. The individual had two copies of the APOE3 Christchurch (R136S) mutation, unusually high brain amyloid levels and limited tau. Doctors in Colombia's rural Antioquia region, which is known for its mountainous terrain and coffee plantations, had never heard of early-onset dementia. Caffeine is known as a protective factor in dementia and coffee drinking may be associated with a decreased risk of dementia/AD. People in the Antioquia region may have developed the APOE3ch mutation as a result of excessive coffee drinking, living in the midst of coffee plantations for centuries. On the contrary, alcohol consumption in excess causes brain damage that can lead to Alzheimer's disease or other forms of dementia.



Abstract
We identified a PSEN1 (presenilin 1) mutation carrier from the world’s largest autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease kindred, who did not develop mild cognitive impairment until her seventies, three decades after the expected age of clinical onset. The individual had two copies of the APOE3 Christchurch (R136S) mutation, unusually high brain amyloid levels and limited tau and neurodegenerative measurements. Our findings have implications for the role of APOE in the pathogenesis, treatment and prevention of Alzheimer’s disease.
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41591-019-0611-3
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By jimjam
#15057089
“Sugar turns on the aging programs in your body,” Dr. Lustig says. “The more sugar you eat, the faster you age.”
By skinster
#15057109
jimjam wrote:“Sugar turns on the aging programs in your body,” Dr. Lustig says. “The more sugar you eat, the faster you age.”


What about honey? :excited:

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