Where does your sense of morality come from? - Politics Forum.org | PoFo

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#15064516
I don't really know how to expand upon this question. We often hear people calling such and such 'evil' or implying that a policy or position is for the moral good - or, conversely, that it is immoral, but in the post-enlightenment, post-modern West, where exactly are people drawing that sense of morality from? Where do you personally draw your morals from, if you have any at all? I would be interested to hear everyone's responses.
Last edited by Local Localist on 05 Feb 2020 03:26, edited 1 time in total.
#15064518
The Golden Rule is where my sense of morality comes from. Do unto others as you would like for other to do unto you.
#15064523
My sense of morality comes from my mother. She raised me to be a Christian. I observe the golden rule. She would read to me from the Bible.

Even though I stopped believing in Christianity in junior high, her teachings still stay with me. I tolerate her religion, but I just cannot follow it.

I also remember reading Aesop's Fables. My favorite is The Tortoise and the Hare. Slow and steady wins the race. My mom says I am that tortoise. I am a slow starter but once I get going, I get going.
#15064576
Harley wrote:I feel I've been blessed with an innate sense of right and wrong.

It's served me well.

Same here. I know that I'm right about everything, and everyone else is wrong about everything. This awareness has served me well over the years. :excited:
#15064581
@Potemkin

Potemkin wrote:Same here. I know that I'm right about everything, and everyone else is wrong about everything. This awareness has served me well over the years. :excited:


That's called narcissism Potem.
#15064594
Politics_Observer wrote:@Potemkin



That's called narcissism Potem.

No, actually it's called "most people's idea of right and wrong". Am I wrong, PO? Lol. ;)
#15064599
I think there is a difference between a sense of morality and a code of morality but there is a lot of overlap because it is easier to work with a sense, especially in a social setting, if you can articulate it and justify it with a framework. People do not necessarily need a code like the Ten Commandments to avoid stealing or murdering but it definitely helps to have that articulation when negotiating social contracts with your fellow humans.

In general one gets one's sense of morality from a very complex ongoing computation of expectations about others factored in with anticipations of what others would expect of one in reciprocation. So for example one might generate the sense that a house guest should not just take a crap in their own pants to save himself the trouble of getting up to use the house toilet facilities because the smell and mess would be unpleasant for all in company. It is from these calculations that all the social pillars of human civilisation are piled up, from trade to concepts of property. Some of these basic expectations are hard wired and quite inflexible but probably most are calculated "on the fly" so to speak and can be very dynamic.

Ultimately all these calculations are in the service of the survival imperative, because they practically help one survive and prosper. However because there are innumerable solutions to the survival problem there can be very different valid solutions depending on the circumstances. A rabbit has a physiology and behaviour which has adapted to solve the survival problem in particular ways at the expense of other valid ways consequently for the rabbit natural solutions come up often and sharply like "it is good to be quick to runaway from danger", "it is bad to be far from a bolt hole". For the lion's situation those calculations do not come up much, instead they tend to get things like "sneaky is better than fast", "watch out for big animals with horns", "target the slow ones in a crowd of prey", "only the fierce get the bitches".

Codes of morality are more or less articulations of these kinds of calculations. Some of these codes of course are asserted to come from a negotiation with a non-human intelligence as with the aforementioned Ten Commandments which is said to be part of deal made with a creator god called Jehovah or something like that. Assuming that is true that in no way invalidates the basis of that code because there really is no particular reason why a moral negotiation need be wholly intra-species unless one is a massively bigoted species chauvinist like the humanists claim to be.

8)
#15064600
Most people's morality is formed by their upbringing, with their parents teaching them what is right and wrong, with input in from society, in general. This is pretty much the case regardless of religion, or lack, thereof.
#15064617
Godstud wrote:Most people's morality is formed by their upbringing, with their parents teaching them what is right and wrong, with input in from society, in general. This is pretty much the case regardless of religion, or lack, thereof.


I'm Agnostic.

I've been told that I'm immoral simply because I don't believe in Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior.

Frankly, the people who've told me that are some of the most immoral people I've ever met.
#15064636
Harley wrote:I've been told that I'm immoral simply because I don't believe in Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior.
Yeah, that's simply religious claptrap.

I've met Buddhists and Atheists/Agnostics who are some of the most morally upstanding people you could imagine. They'd make better Christians that some Christians I have met.

Your upbringing and experiences are very deterministic of your morality.

Harley wrote:Frankly, the people who've told me that are some of the most immoral people I've ever met.
Given that their religion says not to judge others, they aren't glowing representatives of said religion. When you meet good Christians, you know it.
#15064641
Godstud wrote:Yeah, that's simply religious claptrap.

I've met Buddhists and Atheists/Agnostics who are some of the most morally upstanding people you could imagine. They'd make better Christians that some Christians I have met.

Your upbringing and experiences are very deterministic of your morality.

Given that their religion says not to judge others, they aren't glowing representatives of said religion. When you meet good Christians, you know it.

Most people in general are not glowing representatives of their chosen religion. They seem to think that God should serve them and their selfish desires rather than that they should serve God. They seem to regard religion as they regard everything else in the world - as existing only for their own personal convenience. It is not correct to blame their religion for this (as, say, Rich seems to do), since their religion actually teaches the opposite of this. If hypocrisy is the tribute which vice pays to virtue, then virtue can hardly be blamed for extorting that tribute. Lol.
#15064644
Local Localist wrote:I don't really know how to expand upon this question. We often hear people calling such and such 'evil' or implying that a policy or position is for the moral good - or, conversely, that it is immoral, but in the post-enlightenment, post-modern West, where exactly are people drawing that sense of morality from? Where do you personally draw your morals from, if you have any at all? I would be interested to hear everyone's responses.


I think our moral sense is a complex thing. Many things in life are not black or white and are shades of gray as they say. This requires you to understand how you relate to that fully.

People generally are products of their environment, their genes, their mother tongue, their culture, their context and their personality and their filters. How much choice goes into something in decision making is also another factor.

People adapt to their circumstances and environments. The survival instinct is there. But people also can commit suicide even when on the surface they have all their basic psychological and material needs met. They suffer from some ineffable 'void' and want to stop the pain of daily living. Maybe they choose to not struggle. A very common reason for suicide.

In the end? I think your moral sense comes from your internal value systems. And people in your society are interesting. They also project their value systems on to others and assume others think like they do. Often they don't. So there is conflict.

How does one cope with a difference in thinking?

I subscribe to the thought that the only person you really have control over is yourself. Work on your own defects and lacks and stop trying to impose or control others around you and what they do. Ultimately if you change yourself with your own efforts, you wind up changing how you relate to others around you---even the ones you don't get along with or agree with. That is how you change the world.

Also, be social and participate in society. Being passive or not doing or struggling never gets you anywhere in life.

Remember that it only takes about 40 days to 4 months to change a bad habit into a good one if you consciously seek it.

I also think some people lack empathy. They don't have it. And they also choose not to work on it. Those people you need to avoid and leave without your energy, time or effort. They are not worth it.

A human with no sense of obligation, duty or responsibilities towards others and society is a failed member of the species. You need to let them get isolated so they are forced to self reflect. And hopefully they can do a bit of inner work.

Compassion, love, respect, kindness and acceptance of others as they are? Without wanting to judge or control them? Are probably the most noble and spiritual of human qualities. If you have them? Human beings respond like flowers opening their petals to the sun. For humans deep in their hearts and minds? Want that love and respect and acceptance from a person who is good and steadfast more than anything else on Earth.

I know I would.

BTW, Potemkin is not a narcissist at all. I would say he is one of the greatest men I have met in my entire life. And is by far the most well read, with such a sweet character. A rare one of the most wonderful kind.

He prefers to be a very private man. He is someone special. But he sees himself as ordinary and not worthy of praise.

How wrong you are about that Bellisimo. :)
Last edited by Tainari88 on 05 Feb 2020 15:00, edited 1 time in total.
#15064650
Finfinder wrote:Many around here think it comes from their voter registration card.


Lol. They would.

You would be surprised how many people think I am the devil because I am a socialist.

Lol.

They would be wrong about that. But who am I to convince others? Again, I don't control what they think. They do. Not me.

As long as they don't come to my house to shoot me for being a socialist? I have no problem in knowing that they think ill of me.

Again, you can't control people from afar. That is what you think you can do. But people live in their own minds. As such? You got to accept that it is not your mind, and it is theirs.

Life teaches them how many lies have hurt them personally over the years. You don't have to do that part Fin.

You know I have never been to Maine. Not once. The only thing I know about the state are lobster rolls, and it is close to Canada, it is cold and has gray cloudy skies most times of the year and it is the setting for The Shawshank Redemption and other Stephen King novels--like Dolores Claiborne.

I am always interested in my fellow PoFo members lives' so I wonder about how Finfinder became such a staunch conservative? Lol.

I do wonder.

Maybe you will tell me that tale some day?
#15064657
Potemkin wrote:Same here. I know that I'm right about everything, and everyone else is wrong about everything. This awareness has served me well over the years. :excited:


I too am blessed in this sense. All of you are evil doers that need to be thrown in prison.

Politics_Observer wrote:The Golden Rule is where my sense of morality comes from. Do unto others as you would like for other to do unto you.


On a more serious note, I think this should be the basis for all moral and ethical codes. For one BIG BIG BIG reason.

It's easy to understand.

You don't have to be smart to understand this basic idea.
#15064666
Rancid wrote:I too am blessed in this sense. All of you are evil doers that need to be thrown in prison.



On a more serious note, I think this should be the basis for all moral and ethical codes. For one BIG BIG BIG reason.

It's easy to understand.

You don't have to be smart to understand this basic idea.


Lol. You assume people care about others and take care of themselves well though. Many people treat themselves terribly and also are unhappy with who they are....they then fall into misery loves company things.

Thus, why so many people are mistreating others all the time. No pueden tolerarse ellos mismos y mucho menos a los demas.

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