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Discuss literary and artistic creations, or post your own poetry, essays etc.
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By Potemkin
#14984985
Wellsy wrote:Heard it said that it was Russia that first kicked off with “big novels”.

Nah, that was Fielding, Sterne, Balzac, Stendhal et al. The Russians excelled first as poets before they excelled as novelists. The West tends only to be familiar with Russian novelists, whereas Russians themselves revere their poets far more than their novelists. After all, Tolstoy, Dostoyevsky and Turgenev got most of their ideas from Pushkin, Lermontov and Nekrasov. Lol.

Curious to art and culture in Rusdia now that also seen it said how poetry was popular across all parts of society. Something amazing if true when compared to my experience of modern australia and usa

That is true, and there are specific historical reasons for it. In the West, human values could reside in our institutions, which (from the 17th century onwards) were increasingly liberal and humane. Russia, on the other hand, had no tradition of liberalism and no institutions in which human values could be hallowed or safeguarded. Tsarism was a brutal autocracy, under which not even the Russian aristocracy had any power or any freedom of opinion. Even religion could not safeguard human values, since Peter the Great had reduced the Orthodox Church to a subservient branch of the state apparatus. Where else could human values live in Russia, then, if not in the only refuge left to them - in poetry? The poets became the conscience of Russia under Tsarism and, later, under the Soviet system too. Pushkin and Lermontov were killed by the Tsarist system, and died as martyrs to uphold human values in the face of an inhuman political system. Mandelstam self-consciously followed the same path under the Soviet system. Russian poets have historically regarded themselves as prophets and martyrs, who must be willing to die to bear witness to the truth. This explains the high regard in which poets have traditionally been held in Russian society, in contrast to the West, in which writing poetry is regarded as a fucking joke. As Mandelstam's widow Nadezhda put it, "Here, they kill people for it." That's how seriously Russians take poetry - they are willing to kill and to die for it.
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By Wellsy
#14985079
Heisenberg wrote:I mostly can't understand why Jezal doesn't get slapped more.

Yeah he is a pretty pathetic whinge and only becomes slightly more endearing the further along he goes for less whinging but still not entirely likable as a character.

Inquisitor glokta Whinges a lot but part of that is he is in constant pain and not just a pathetic response to circumstance.

Potemkin wrote:Nah, that was Fielding, Sterne, Balzac, Stendhal et al. The Russians excelled first as poets before they excelled as novelists. The West tends only to be familiar with Russian novelists, whereas Russians themselves revere their poets far more than their novelists. After all, Tolstoy, Dostoyevsky and Turgenev got most of their ideas from Pushkin, Lermontov and Nekrasov. Lol.

I stand corrected

That is true, and there are specific historical reasons for it. In the West, human values could reside in our institutions, which (from the 17th century onwards) were increasingly liberal and humane. Russia, on the other hand, had no tradition of liberalism and no institutions in which human values could be hallowed or safeguarded. Tsarism was a brutal autocracy, under which not even the Russian aristocracy had any power or any freedom of opinion. Even religion could not safeguard human values, since Peter the Great had reduced the Orthodox Church to a subservient branch of the state apparatus. Where else could human values live in Russia, then, if not in the only refuge left to them - in poetry? The poets became the conscience of Russia under Tsarism and, later, under the Soviet system too. Pushkin and Lermontov were killed by the Tsarist system, and died as martyrs to uphold human values in the face of an inhuman political system. Mandelstam self-consciously followed the same path under the Soviet system. Russian poets have historically regarded themselves as prophets and martyrs, who must be willing to die to bear witness to the truth. This explains the high regard in which poets have traditionally been held in Russian society, in contrast to the West, in which writing poetry is regarded as a fucking joke. As Mandelstam's widow Nadezhda put it, "Here, they kill people for it." That's how seriously Russians take poetry - they are willing to kill and to die for it.

Shiiiiit, some serious art from some hard repression.
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By Potemkin
#14985082
Wellsy wrote:Shiiiiit, some serious art from some hard repression.

Yup, and of course when the repression (largely) stopped, so did the serious art. Being a poet in Russia no longer means what it once did. Some poets have never managed to adjust to their lowly status in the New Russia. They have been robbed of their halo of martyrdom, and they now cut rather pathetic figures. :lol:
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By khawarezm
#14986660
I am currently reading Steve Jobs biography. Usually I prefer autobiographies over biographies, so this is an exceptional case in the modern era of my life.

I liked how chapter 13 introduced the concept of divergence which is relevant to GUIs and icons in the context of computers, and to light in the context of America.
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By Drlee
#14990835
The Road to Little Dribbling

Bill Bryson

Image
By skinster
#14990859
I like Bill Bryson.

Reading Tony Benn's diaries at the moment. Fuck my lack of reading-time these days and basically any job that doesn't let me read while I'm there...fuck them jobs to the hellfire!
By skinster
#15006231
Recently read Bill Bryson's book Shakespeare, it was all right but not as good as his book on the English language which I'm really enjoying right now, it's called Mother Tongue.

I re-read the Akala book Natives because it's really good and I found it to be extremely relatable to my experience growing up as a person of colourooski in England, although I am a bit envious that his parents pushed education type stuff at him (I did not enjoy that luxury :violin: )

Finally got around to reading Pedagogy of the Oppressed and feel like it's something I need to re-read because amongst other things, it constantly made me feel like being nicer and more understanding/patient. :D

Alongside the Bryson book I'm reading Max Blumenthal's new book The Management of Savagery, which so far basically appears to be about the (ongoing) symbiotic relationship between American foreign policy and Islamist groups like Al-Qaeda, Al-Nusra, ISIS, etc. I now see why people were cancelling his book events and such in the U.S. recently...

Unemployment rules for reading. :D
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By Drlee
#15006270
Bryson is amazing. He had me with "Notes from a Small Island".

I envy your reading time these days. Last week I had a long flight. Actually two long flights and two nights in a hotel. Coast to coast on Wednesday and Friday. I actually got to read uninterrupted for many hours. Joy. Read Treavor Noah's Autobiography and reread One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel García Márquez.
By skinster
#15006500
Drlee wrote:I envy your reading time these days.


Me too. I am still wishing for retirement so if you/anyone wants to help sponsor that, feel free. Anyway, I think you'd like Bryson's Mother Tongue. I saw At Home by him in a book shop today and think I'll pick it up at some point since he's such a fun/easy read. I was going to buy Sapiens by Yuval Noah Harari and Matthew Walker's Why We Sleep but I managed to stop myself in favour of focusing on books at home I haven't read yet. I'll get them later.
By anasawad
#15006510
@skinster
Put a couple hundred dollars every month aside and invest in Indian indices. (Do the research for which ones matches your risk inclination obviously)
The US is heading towards a crash with many bubbles growing in the US economy; Trump's policies and deregulation wont be of help.
The Chinese economy is also heading towards a crash, not due to the trade war, but simply the ever growing credit and real estate bubbles in the Chinese economy so far continuously expanding since over 15 years; So not a safe option.
Russia is also heading towards a crash, oil prices aren't helping.
Ukraine, Belarus, the Baltics and Scandinavia are stabilizing economically, but the return rates aren't all that good. Likewise for the EU.
The only countries who are growing and will continue to grow even under a crash are in south and south east Asia. Especially India having good prospects.
Look into it, do your research, and invest in your future; You wont regret it.
By skinster
#15006515
I don't live in genocidal America anymore. Also, I don't even know what an indices is but I heard you're rich, want to sponsor my retirement? :D #askingforafrand
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By Drlee
#15006641
Wonderful Ter. Should be required watching..
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By fuser
#15006748
Started the "Culture" series by Iain M. Banks with the first book called "Consider Phlebas"; ready to dive in the communist/anarchist utopia.

Also "The Ancient Near East" by Mario Liverani.
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By Potemkin
#15006750
fuser wrote:Started the "Culture" series by Iain M. Banks with the first book called "Consider Phlebas"; ready to dive in the communist/anarchist utopia.

You've got a treat in store, fuser. Banks' 'Culture' novels are excellent - the finest 'space operas' ever written. I think 'Use of Weapons' is my favourite - the plot switchback at the end makes you want to go back to the beginning of the book and read it all again. And that's a good thing.... Lol. :)
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