Alabama Governor: Blame the Unvaccinated Folks - Politics Forum.org | PoFo

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#15182243
Wow! How do other republicans feel, especially the unvaccinated republicans, about this republican governor now saying "blame the unvaccinated!" Really? Wasn't it republican politicians encouraging their base not to get vaccinated? Now, they want to just say "blame the unvaccinated!" She doesn't blame the "regular folks" just the unvaccinated. I guess the unvaccinated republicans aren't "regular folks" and are now out of the republican tribe in her eyes. :lol: These republicans just don't make any sense at all.

Veronica Stracqualursi of CNN wrote:Alabama Republican Gov. Kay Ivey on Thursday called out "the unvaccinated folks" for the rise in Covid-19 cases in her state, a remarkable plea at a time when many GOP leaders are refusing to urge people to get vaccinated even as Covid-19 cases surge in many parts of the country.

"Folks are supposed to have common sense. But it's time to start blaming the unvaccinated folks, not the regular folks. It's the unvaccinated folks that are letting us down," Ivey told reporters in Birmingham.

Alabama is the least vaccinated state in the country, with roughly 33.9% of residents fully vaccinated, according to data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Average daily Covid-19 cases in Alabama are nearly double what they were a week ago, and more than four times higher than they were two weeks ago.

Asked by reporters Thursday about plans to issue a mask mandate or other restrictions now that Covid cases are starting to rise again in her state, Ivey replied, "The new cases of Covid are because of unvaccinated folks. Almost 100% of the new hospitalizations are with unvaccinated folks. And the deaths are certainly occurring with unvaccinated folks."

The unvaccinated, Ivey said, are "choosing a horrible lifestyle of self-inflicted pain."

"We've got to get folks to take the shot," she continued, calling the vaccine "the greatest weapon we have to fight Covid."

Alabama has received billions in federal relief funds from the stimulus package passed by Congress and signed by President Joe Biden earlier this year. The state has offered some small incentives to get vaccinated, including offering two laps around the Talladega Superspeedway in May. But unlike other states, Alabama has not used the federal relief money for an incentive program, scholarships or lotteries, AL.com has reported. Earlier this month, Ivey said there was no need for an incentive plan for vaccinations.

On Thursday, Ivey insisted that she's done "all I know how to do" in managing the situation. When asked what it would take to get more people to get shots, she replied, "I don't know, you tell me."

Ivey ended the state's mask mandate in April, at the time favoring personal responsibility rather than a government mandate. The CDC had announced in May that fully vaccinated people would no longer have to wear masks.

But now with the Delta variant spreading, experts are saying vaccinated and unvaccinated people should wear masks in areas where Covid-19 cases are high but vaccination rates are low.

Ivey on Thursday was asked by a reporter what it would take to implement a mask mandate, and replied that "I want folks to get vaccinated" and "why would we want mess around with just temporary stuff?"

The governor said she received both doses of the Covid vaccine in December.

"It's safe, it's effective, the data proves that it works, doesn't cost anything. It saves lives," she said.

Asked about whether she would recommend children who are too young to be vaccinated wear a mask when they return to school, Ivey said that the decision would be left up to school districts.

White House press secretary Jen Psaki said Friday that "we understand (Ivey's) frustration" over pockets of vaccine resistance when asked about the Alabama governor's comments and whether the Biden administration should take a sharper tone against unvaccinated people.

"I don't think our role is to place blame, but what we can do is provide accurate information to people who are not yet vaccinated about the risks they are incurring not only among on themselves, but also the people around them," Psaki said.

Asked whether the federal government should issue vaccine mandates, Psaki replied, "What our role is and what we're going to continue to do is make the vaccine available, we're going to continue to work in partnership to fight misinformation, and we're going to continue to advocate and work in partnership with local officials and trusted voices to get the word out."

In recent days -- amid surges largely occurring in states former President Donald Trump won in 2020 -- increasing numbers of Republicans and conservative media figures have called upon Americans to get the vaccine after months of declining to press the issue. But many Republican leaders still won't say publicly​ whether they are vaccinated and Trump himself has cast the vaccine in political terms, suggesting people aren't taking it because "they don't trust (Biden's) Administration."


https://www.cnn.com/2021/07/23/politics ... index.html



Personally, I don't think pointing fingers and blaming others is going to get anywhere. In my view, what needs to happen is republican politicians and leaders start setting a public example and show their constituents that they are getting vaccinated and stop spreading vaccine disinformation. It starts with the republican leadership by having some integrity and setting the example for their constituents to follow. That will go much further than "blaming folks." Republican politicians just need to start spreading the message to their base and constituents that getting vaccinated saves lives and combat any sort of disinformation out there on vaccines. Setting the example and being a leader will get you much further than "blaming folks." Everything starts with the leadership.
#15182248
Politics_Observer wrote:Wow! How do other republicans feel, especially the unvaccinated republicans, about this republican governor now saying "blame the unvaccinated!" Really? Wasn't it republican politicians encouraging their base not to get vaccinated? Now, they want to just say "blame the unvaccinated!" She doesn't blame the "regular folks" just the unvaccinated. I guess the unvaccinated republicans aren't "regular folks" and are now out of the republican tribe in her eyes. :lol: These republicans just don't make any sense at all.



https://www.cnn.com/2021/07/23/politics ... index.html



Personally, I don't think pointing fingers and blaming others is going to get anywhere. In my view, what needs to happen is republican politicians and leaders start setting a public example and show their constituents that they are getting vaccinated and stop spreading vaccine disinformation. It starts with the republican leadership by having some integrity and setting the example for their constituents to follow. That will go much further than "blaming folks." Republican politicians just need to start spreading the message to their base and constituents that getting vaccinated saves lives and combat any sort of disinformation out there on vaccines. Setting the example and being a leader will get you much further than "blaming folks." Everything starts with the leadership.


I feel sorry for her. Notice the question. "what would it take..." And she is like "you tell me".

:lol:
I would feel sorry for her, except... all these republicans zealots have brought this nonsense upon themselves.
#15182254
@XogGyux

The leadership of the republican party is responsible for failing to set the right example by publicly getting vaccinated and encouraging their base to get vaccinated too. It was also the leadership of the republican party who is responsible for combating vaccine disinformation instead of allowing it to go unchallenged or encouraging it. Every last republican leader should be coming out and getting publicly vaccinated for all to see and if they have already been vaccinated, talk about how they have been vaccinated and encourage others to do the same.

The blame for republican voters not getting vaccinated rests squarely on the shoulders of the leadership of the republican politicians in power. That's whose to blame. The buck stops with the leadership. Clearly, the republican governor of Alabama has failed as a leader by failing to set the example and combating disinformation around vaccination.

She doesn't seem to have a plan nor do I remember publicly getting vaccinated and also encouraging other leadership figures in the state of Alabama to also get publicly vaccinated. This is what happens when you have bad leadership: a disaster that costs lives. It all starts with the leadership.
#15182256
Politics_Observer wrote:@XogGyux

The leadership of the republican party is responsible for failing to set the right example by publicly getting vaccinated and encouraging their base to get vaccinated too. It was also the leadership of the republican party who is responsible for combating vaccine disinformation instead of allowing it to go unchallenged or encouraging it. Every last republican leader should be coming out and getting publicly vaccinated for all to see and if they have already been vaccinated, talk about how they have been vaccinated and encourage others to do the same.

The blame for republican voters not getting vaccinated rests squarely on the shoulders of the leadership of the republican politicians in power. That's whose to blame. The buck stops with the leadership. Clearly, the republican governor of Alabama has failed as a leader by failing to set the example and combating disinformation around vaccination.

She doesn't seem to have a plan nor do I remember publicly getting vaccinated and also encouraging other leadership figures in the state of Alabama to also get publicly vaccinated. This is what happens when you have bad leadership: a disaster that costs lives. It all starts with the leadership.


Who is the political genius that decided to make this a political issue?
#15182259
Politics_Observer wrote:@XogGyux

The leadership of the republican party is responsible for failing to set the right example by publicly getting vaccinated and encouraging their base to get vaccinated too. It was also the leadership of the republican party who is responsible for combating vaccine disinformation instead of allowing it to go unchallenged or encouraging it. Every last republican leader should be coming out and getting publicly vaccinated for all to see and if they have already been vaccinated, talk about how they have been vaccinated and encourage others to do the same.

The blame for republican voters not getting vaccinated rests squarely on the shoulders of the leadership of the republican politicians in power. That's whose to blame. The buck stops with the leadership. Clearly, the republican governor of Alabama has failed as a leader by failing to set the example and combating disinformation around vaccination.

She doesn't seem to have a plan nor do I remember publicly getting vaccinated and also encouraging other leadership figures in the state of Alabama to also get publicly vaccinated. This is what happens when you have bad leadership: a disaster that costs lives. It all starts with the leadership.


@Politics_Observer , this plague should never have been a political issue, but every issue in the Modern age has become so. The only thing that I can think impels these people who don't want to COVID vaccinate is this;

1. Some look at some things like Tuskegee incident which targeted blacks and other medical fiascos and are worried about getting vaccinated because of that history.

2. Some are Contrarian Libertarian-leaning assholes, of whom there is a sizable contingent among so-called ''Conservatives'', who reject this on Ideological grounds.

3. A sizable number are against vaccinations in general, and will never take one of any kind,much less the COVID-19 ones.

4. There is also something of an overlap with numbers 1, 2, and 3.
#15182260
@XogGyux @annatar1914

And get this, her state has ALL this federal aid at their disposal (and the federal government should be helping Alabama combat the virus). ALL this help from the federal government. BILLIONS OF DOLLARS this governor has at her disposal and yet she hasn't used any of it and her best answer is "I don't know you tell me!" Well look her lady, YOU are the governor! If you don't know you better start talking to some good advisors really quick to get you educated and a plan in place and START KNOWING.

Here is a quote from the CNN article I posted above that I am referring to.

Veronica Stracqualursi of CNN wrote:Alabama has received billions in federal relief funds from the stimulus package passed by Congress and signed by President Joe Biden earlier this year. The state has offered some small incentives to get vaccinated, including offering two laps around the Talladega Superspeedway in May. But unlike other states, Alabama has not used the federal relief money for an incentive program, scholarships or lotteries, AL.com has reported. Earlier this month, Ivey said there was no need for an incentive plan for vaccinations.


"I don't know, you tell me" is not an acceptable answer when you have many advisors you can turn to have gotten the answer beforehand and you have BILLIONS of dollars in Federal aid you can use to combat the virus but haven't bothered even using it or touching it.
#15182262
Politics_Observer wrote:@XogGyux @annatar1914

And get this, her state has ALL this federal aid been given to them. ALL this help from the federal government. BILLIONS OF DOLLARS this governor has at her disposal and yet she hasn't used any of it and her best answer is "I don't know you tell me!" Well look her lady, YOU are the governor! If you don't know you better start talking to some good advisors really quick to get you educated and a plan in place and START KNOWING.

Here is a quote from the CNN article I posted above that I am referring to.



"I don't know, you tell me" is not an acceptable answer when you have many advisors you can turn to have gotten the answer beforehand.


@Politics_Observer , I agree, she is not a leader. But at this point she's right about the un-vaccinated. I think I read somewhere that 99.5 % of COVID 19 deaths now are the un-vaccinated. It's a damn tragedy.

I'm broad minded about this; use Ivermectin, use Hydroxychloroquine, use anything that might workas a palliative or preventative, mask everyone up, lock down strictly, when vaccines are available, make them mandatory. This is a national and world emergency, don't make this political either way.
#15182263
@annatar1914

I learned a long time ago that the mistakes a leader makes goes into coffins. It doesn't matter whether you are an officer or NCO on the battlefield or a governor of a state or President of an entire country. Your mistakes go into one of these things when you can't lead (your subordinates or people you are responsible for die un-necessarily due to poor leadership):

Image
#15182267
Politics_Observer wrote:@annatar1914

I learned a long time ago that the mistakes a leader makes goes into coffins. It doesn't matter whether you are an officer or NCO on the battlefield or a governor of a state or President of an entire country. Your mistakes go into one of these things when you can't lead (your subordinates or people you are responsible for die un-necessarily due to poor leadership):

Image


@Politics_Observer , It is a burden of responsibility even on the level of leadership with family and friends, local community.
#15183810
@QatzelOk

Maybe you should ask this Florida RNC clown who has called vaccines the "mark of the beast." :lol:

Em Steck, Drew Myers and Andrew Kaczynski of CNN wrote:Amid recent surging coronavirus cases in Florida, a top Republican National Committee official in the state has spread anti-vaccine rhetoric and misinformation, comparing the Biden administration's vaccine efforts to Nazi-era "brown shirts," and twice calling the vaccines "the mark of the beast," comparable to a "false god."

A review by CNN's KFile found that Peter Feaman, a lawyer and RNC committeeman from Florida made the comments on his blog the "The Backhoe Chronicles," which he publishes regularly in a private group on MeWe. The social media platform bills itself as the "anti-Facebook" app.


https://www.cnn.com/2021/08/02/politics ... index.html

He's definitely not the sharpest tool in the shed. Maybe this helps explain these "unvaccinated folks." :lol:
#15183822
@Gardener Have you been living in a cave?

Nearly 40% of Republicans are still hesitant about getting the Covid-19 vaccine or refuse to get it, a new Public Religion Research Institute (PRRI)/Interfaith Youth Core (IFYC) poll finds, though certain subsets of the GOP appear notably more likely to accept or refuse the shot based on their religion, media consumption and whether or not they believe in the QAnon conspiracy theory.
https://www.forbes.com/sites/alisondurk ... 540eca735f

As GOP supporters die of Covid, the party remains split in its vaccination message
Analysis: Top Trump supporters keep casting doubt on Covid-19 vaccines. Ahead of next year's midterms, that means missing a chance to give Trump credit.

While Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., urged Americans to get dosed this week and House Minority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., released a photo of his injection, Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, R-Ga., was suspended from Twitter for spreading misinformation that played down the risk of the virus, which has killed more than 600,000 people in the U.S.

Fox News prime-time hosts Tucker Carlson and Sean Hannity, both major influencers within Republican circles, have split over the issue. Carlson is fueling vaccine skepticism; Hannity, who once played down the risk of the virus, is urging Americans to take the jab. Laura Ingraham, another high-profile Fox host, has given voice to skeptics and accused Democrats of "coercion" in promoting vaccines.

https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/politi ... e-n1274619

Top Republicans denounce Oklahoma GOP for comparing vaccine mandates to Jewish persecution
Top Oklahoma Republicans on Friday denounced the state's Republican Party for its Facebook post comparing COVID-19 vaccine mandates to the persecution of Jewish people during the Holocaust.

In a joint statement, Gov. Kevin Stitt, Lt. Gov. Matt Pinnell, U.S. Sens. Jim Inhofe and James Lankford, U.S. Rep. Markwayne Mullin, Senate Pro Tem Greg Treat, R-Oklahoma City, and House Speaker Charles McCall, R-Atoka, criticized the social media post that was still up as of Friday evening.

“It is irresponsible and wrong to compare an effective vaccine — developed by President Trump’s Operation Warp Speed — to the horrors of the Holocaust," the Republicans said. "People should have the liberty to choose if they take the vaccine, but we should never compare the unvaccinated to the victims of the Holocaust.”

https://www.oklahoman.com/story/news/20 ... 438423001/

Unvaccinated Americans Whiter, More Republican Than Vaccinated
Americans who say they will definitely not get vaccinated against COVID-19 are overwhelmingly white and Republican, according to polling by the Kaiser Family Foundation.
https://www.voanews.com/covid-19-pandem ... vaccinated

https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics ... kepticism/
#15183904
Godstud wrote:@Gardener Have you been living in a cave?

Nearly 40% of Republicans are still hesitant about getting the Covid-19 vaccine or refuse to get it, a new Public Religion Research Institute (PRRI)/Interfaith Youth Core (IFYC) poll finds, though certain subsets of the GOP appear notably more likely to accept or refuse the shot based on their religion, media consumption and whether or not they believe in the QAnon conspiracy theory.
https://www.forbes.com/sites/alisondurk ... 540eca735f

And what the Forbes article fails to mention is that in a Scientific American article, 50% of the US population overall is vaccine skeptical. So if anything, the 'Republicans' are MORE trusting of the vaccine than the average American ?
https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... s-vaccine/

So much then, perhaps, for the hypothesis that 'Repubicans' are more vaccine-averse ?

Welcome to my cave. Do you like the rugs ?
#15183907
Politics_Observer wrote:Trump! :lol:


Not one for defending Trump, but he didn't tell people not to get vaccinated. If anything that was his only success. Operation Warp Speed. He said he was going to have a Vaccine ready at the start of the year and he did. The issue is that Republican voters are also Conspiracy Nuts who believe EVERYTHING that makes it way onto the Internet. That isn't a political issue. That is an issue with gullibility and if blame needs to go anywhere, it needs to go to Social Media websites not policing their websites good enough.
#15183911
Gardener wrote:And what the Forbes article fails to mention is that in a Scientific American article, 50% of the US population overall is vaccine skeptical. So if anything, the 'Republicans' are MORE trusting of the vaccine than the average American ?
https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... s-vaccine/

So much then, perhaps, for the hypothesis that 'Repubicans' are more vaccine-averse ?

Welcome to my cave. Do you like the rugs ?


From your source:

    In an AP-NORC poll in mid-May, fewer than 50 percent of Americans surveyed said they would commit to getting a coronavirus vaccine whenever it becomes available.

This was May of 2020.

The Forbes article mentions that their poll was conducted in June of 2021.

Obviously, attitudes towards vaccines have changed since May of 2020 since a lot has happened since then.

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