UK votes for Boris... - Politics Forum.org | PoFo

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#15053818
Many people thought the Tories would probably win, but few expected a landslide like this. It's incredible. Boris has well and truly kicked Corbyn and his left wing Marxists out of government. This is a vote for Brexit, it's a vote for the future of an independent Great Britain who makes our own trade deals rather than takes instructions from an unelected EU Commissioner. Fuck the EU and fuck EU supporting politicians. This is a great day :)
#15053829


I like the campaign slogan 'Get Brexit Done' by which the Tories gained the biggest majority since 1987. As a result, Brexit will happen by the end of the next month. Boris may turn out to be as popular as Thatcher was back in the 1980s.
#15053945
There's more to life than Brexit, although you'd never guess it from the passionate defenders of Leave and Remain. On the ground, all the trade ballyhoo will mean zilch. But you will see a lot more rough sleepers and privatization (putting the NHS on the table lol).
By Atlantis
#15053961
Red Rackham wrote:Boris has well and truly kicked Corbyn and his left wing Marxists out of government.


Corbyn never was in government. So he can't be kicked out of government. Anyways, it's not too hard to win against a far-left ideologue in the UK. Remember, Brits don't do revolution, or haven't done so for a very long time.

This is a vote for Brexit, it's a vote for the future of an independent Great Britain ...


No, it's a vote for Little England. Anyways, with only 44% of the popular vote, he has no mandate for a hard Brexit. People will realize soon enough that Brexit solves none of their daily problems. On the contrary, the de-industrialized North will take another hit. Deregulation will expose British industry to a race to the bottom it cannot win.
#15053977
Red Rackham wrote:This is a vote for Brexit, it's a vote for the future of an independent Great Britain who makes our own trade deals rather than takes instructions from an unelected EU Commissioner. Fuck the EU and fuck EU supporting politicians. This is a great day

Prepare to be disappointed.

rather than takes instructions from an unelected EU Commissioner.

Trump's effective dissolution of the WTO’s Appellate Body, commonly thought of as the supreme court of trade, will create long-term instability across markets worldwide.

If the WTO’s Appellate Body is unable to perform effectively, the bigger economies will take unilateral action.

With no means of redress, the UK will be forced to take instruction from an unelected EU Commissioner or cease trading.


:lol:
Last edited by ingliz on 13 Dec 2019 22:03, edited 1 time in total.
#15053982
Red Rackham wrote:Many people thought the Tories would probably win, but few expected a landslide like this. It's incredible. Boris has well and truly kicked Corbyn and his left wing Marxists out of government. This is a vote for Brexit, it's a vote for the future of an independent Great Britain who makes our own trade deals rather than takes instructions from an unelected EU Commissioner. Fuck the EU and fuck EU supporting politicians. This is a great day :)


Uhh, it was expected since Farange stopped campaigning and was fairly obvious because Corbyn didn't strike the same deal with the Lib Dems.

As for the total vote, well support for Brexit went down a bit. Tories were the only leave party and they got 43%. Not even considering that not all Tories are Brexiteers etc.
#15053986
In regards to the thread title, the UK didn't vote for Johnson. Just 43% did. With FPTP what seems like a landslide is merely a ripple.

This will be known as the no win election. Once we are out of the EU and recession hits, there is only one party that will get the blame. The one party who campaigned for the clusterfuck to begin with and I suspect we will see a Labour huge majority after five years of Johnson.
User avatar
By Kaiserschmarrn
#15053997
Too busy to be on here much at the moment, but wanted to register my pleasure with this result. Very happy obviously and quite relieved that the democracy wreckers have been shown their place, including all those who either defected from the Tories or were thrown out.

I had a hard time at first believing reports about Leigh (!) voting Tory. Then came the results for the north of Wales, the Northeast and the Midlands. And it's not just Conservatives taking seats that had been Labour seats for decades, sometimes a century, but the size of the swing and the Labour share also being greatly reduced in many seats they managed to hold.



This article is a fairly accurate description of the big picture in my view, although I do think that Corbyn and his entourage played a bigger role in Labour's defeat than is acknowledged here (see below).

Unherd wrote:
The danger ahead for Boris Johnson

Behind the Tory victory stands a mass of voices that have long been excluded from politics. Can the PM please them all?

Why did the Tories bother with a manifesto? The real electioneering was over before the election was even called — in the Parliamentary psychodrama leading up to Britain’s failure to leave the EU on 31 October.

Johnson’s opponents were handily played. They failed to grasp that the most salient issue for ordinary British voters today is not any one specific policy, but the simple question of whether voting ever changes anything. In the unedifying spectacle of their efforts to block Brexit, culminating in the Benn Act, Parliament’s Remain Alliance set about demonstrating to an appalled public that if it were left to them? No: voting would change nothing, ever.

This election was at root about a technocratic style of politics which has been the status quo for decades: an ever-growing range of issues is ring-fenced through mechanisms not easily subject to change via the democratic process. The worldview it enshrines can be summarised as ‘double liberalism’.

If Thatcher drove a greater degree of ‘openness’ in the economy, liberalising the financial sector and privatising monopoly utilities, Blair drove something equivalent in society. The new ‘openness’, first of the economy and then of society was entrenched via unaccountable quangos and EU treaties against which, in the words of Jean-Claude Juncker, “There can be no democratic choice”. The electoral fightback against this is the long narrative arc of Boris Johnson’s path to victory.

When, in 2015, David Cameron scored a surprise majority, his government concluded that this represented a mandate for double-liberal policies. He believed it possible to drive ‘openness’ on both social and economic fronts, and that rising freedom and prosperity would somehow magic away any costs and externalities.

He was wrong. In fact it was Cameron’s offer of an in/out referendum on the EU that handed him a majority. What the electorate wanted, more than austerity or gay marriage, was a chance to vote democratically on Britain’s continued participation in the central elite mechanism for avoiding confrontations with democracy. His majority was not a victory for double liberalism but the first move in an electoral rebellion against it.

The ugly story of elite resistance to the Leave vote after the 2016 referendum has done nothing to reassure electorates that the status quo Cameron so quintessentially represented might be salvageable. Voters have been treated to salvo after salvo from well-funded, well-connected insiders hell-bent on retaining their prime means of evading democratic accountability on favoured policies.

This culminated in Boris’ unofficial election campaign. Over September and October this year, the nail-biting finale to season 3 (?) of the Brexit drama saw Boris’ team baiting Parliamentary Remainers into deploying every means at their disposal to ring-fence outside politics the very issue of pre-political ringfencing. That is, they tried to use the judicial system as well as every constitutional trick in the book to stop the EU referendum result being implemented. The brazenness of this effort cut through even to that majority of the electorate which is largely apolitical. It has, rightly, triggered outrage.

Most people in the UK have no avenues for political influence other than their vote. No seats on quangos, no friends in think tanks, no contacts in the media or in lobbying firms or Parliament. Is it any wonder ordinary voters, even in such obdurately Labour constituencies as Leigh and Bolsover, have handed a thumping majority to the only party that appears willing to do as voters ask?

Demonstrating the Tories’ apparently unique willingness to obey the electorate was Boris’ real pitch for election. His victory was in the bag before his opponents even realised he was campaigning.

Tom Chivers was spot on when he wrote that he expected the party manifestos to have zero impact. The Tory manifesto was thin, he said. Indeed. The real Tory manifesto was Johnson’s resistance to the Benn Act. The official manifesto document was mostly an exercise in trying not to distract from his martyrdom on 31 October, plus the use of ‘Get Brexit Done’ to hammer home Boris’ willingness to have another go, if elected, at obeying the electorate.

This tactic has seen Johnson smash through Labour’s ‘Red Wall’. Aided by Corbyn’s unappetising combination of elite wokeness and hard-left anti-Semitism, the Conservatives have taken working-class constituencies some of which have been Labour for decades. Many of these felt abandoned by a Labour Party that considers their small-c social conservative outlook retrograde and their votes as a given. These communities wanted their voice back, and were horrified by the prospect of an ostensibly left-wing alliance working in plain sight in Parliament to deny them this.

What form, then, will Boris’ policy platform take as he seeks to incorporate that voice in a new Conservative regime? Johnson himself strikes me as a largely unprincipled but astute political actor, who will do his best to find the new centre ground. He will be wise to listen to those in his party who recognise that his landslide is emphatically not a mandate for a return to ‘double liberalism’.

We must hope that when he does nail his colours to the mast, he heeds the growing body of commentary that shows this centre ground is less double liberalism than what Matt Singh at CapX called “fund the NHS, hang the paedos”.

There is cautious ground for hope here: as David Goodhart has remarked, it is easier for the Tories to move left on the economy than Labour to move right on society. And all the talk this morning is of how the new Tory MPs in the post-industrial North will be driving the party Left on the economy.

If Johnson takes this route, there is good reason to think it will be popular (at least with ordinary voters). He will face some formidable resistance though. For if Johnson’s victory was forged by a new coalition of socially conservative working-class voters and Shire Tories left voiceless by Cameroon double liberalism, he will also have his party’s Thatcherite wing to please.

Not to mention the unfolding negotiations with the EU, in which the bargaining power of the entire EU27 and its institutionalised double-liberalism will be arrayed against him. Balancing these exigencies with the demands of his newly-minted electoral coalition (and the shrill fury of the domestic double-liberal ruling class) will be challenging to say the least.

One thing, though, is clear: Boris has been voted in, to all intents and purposes, on a promise to end the institutionalised hegemony of double-liberal managerial politics. He will have to deliver, or face a renewed wave of electoral fury.

Any sincere effort to achieve this will mean difficult confrontations. Behind Johnson’s victory today stands a mass of voices that have long been excluded from politics, first by a discourse that held them in contempt and then by the progressive removal of salient policies from democratic accountability.

The small-c social conservatism of many working-class voters has long been traduced as morally beyond the pale by the Left, just as the communitarian economic policies favoured by much of the same demographic have been treated as romantic foolishness by the right. Rehabilitating these voices will mean challenging heavyweight opinion on both Right and Left. It will also mean for Johnson the delicate task of rescuing some political priorities that are salient to this group — such as immigration, family and law and order — from the embrace of demagoguery, without himself falling prey to its clutches.

Will Boris succeed in defusing the electorate’s bubbling anger by bringing long-excluded voices and priorities back into mainstream political debate? That remains to be seen. We must hope he has the courage to try.





It's a double victory. Continuity remainers contemptuous about democracy and the odious Corbyn have both been defeated. Regardless of what comes next, this is a reason to celebrate.
By B0ycey
#15053998
Kaiserschmarrn wrote:Regardless of what comes next, this is a reason to celebrate.


...said the Austrian in New Zealand.

The only good thing that will come from this result is that this bullshit is over. I doubt it will be for the better or worthy of celebration even down under.
By skinster
#15054117
Kaiserschmarrn wrote:...I do think that Corbyn and his entourage played a bigger role in Labour's defeat than is acknowledged here


You spelt the MSM, establishment, U.S. empire and remoaners wrong.
#15054134
Red_Army wrote:Just like the OP most of the people of the UK are easily deluded morons.


Well considering the fact that 32% of the country have voted for a scum such as Corbyn who promised them the moon I would say you are right

Capitalism and free market is what made the west so successful but lets throw this all out of the window and take example from failed countries like Venezuela in the name of "justice" and "equality" (everyone equally poor)
#15054139
I hope the world can overcome idiotic half-brained takes like yours before we all die. I hope the limeys are happy with our healthcare after the Tories sell it to us. Not even Israel is evil enough to do that.
#15054140
ahahah you seem angry RA calm down :lol: you know I dont really care about the UK or whatever happen with your healthcare I just dont you guys to interfere in our shit but looks like some of your candidates are dangerous so we need to support opposition at any cost
#15054147
Red_Army wrote:I'm not angry I just think you're dumb. And you are dumb, so it shouldn't be a surprise to anyone that I think that :lol:


ok whatever
anyway Im not a propagandist Im just here for fun I dont hide my views

I understand your views and I would probably vote Labor IF I lived in Britain as someone poor and with bad health

Im just not in that position Im pragmatic another example IF I lived in Britain as a rich person I would never support the socialists since they would tax the fuck out of me

I understand the appeal of socialism to some people but its just not for me
#15054149
Red_Army wrote:Aren't you a DUI-ridden drop-out who lives at home? How are you worried about being taxed?

I do like your stories to be honest.


Well I returned to collage also Im working and saving cash also gonna take the business of my father later on
I have no reason to support the working class
#15054150
Red_Army wrote:Aren't you a DUI-ridden drop-out who lives at home? How are you worried about being taxed?

How dare you RA?! ZN may have been born in the body of a poor, unemployable dropout, but he is trans-class and identifies as a millionaire. He came out when he mother caught him one day strutting up and down in front of a mirror while wearing a top hat, bow tie and tails and carrying a silver-handled walking cane. Have you no sympathy for his struggles and sufferings as a millionaire trapped in the body of a penniless scuzzball? You fiend, RA! >:

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