Taliban will not be allowing girls in Afghanistan to go to university - Politics Forum.org | PoFo

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#15219145
The Taliban has renegaded on a promise that women would be allowed to go to college.
Right after the United States abandoned Afghanistan and let the Taliban take over again, it was promised that women would be allowed to go to gender-segregated schools.

Now the Taliban has announced that women will no longer be allowed to go to college.
Taliban bars Afghan girls from attending school beyond 6th grade : NPR
https://www.npr.org/2022/03/23/10882027 ... rls-school

Not only that but the Taliban has also closed all women's high schools, saying that they will remain closed until the government comes up with a plan to operate them according to Islamic law.
Taliban orders girls' high schools to remain closed, leaving students in tears | Reuters
https://www.reuters.com/world/asia-paci ... 022-03-23/

Let's remember that 21 years ago, in 2001, the United States (along with several allies) invaded Afghanistan to remove the Taliban from power.
News media at the time was celebrating that this would be a huge victory for women's rights and people around the world (well, at least outside of the Muslim World) were shocked at what women there had had to put up with.
But then in late 2021, after a peace agreement had been negotiated with the Taliban to try to bring the conflict to a permanent close and finally bring stability to the country, the Taliban went on the offensive again, and the United States, under the leadership of Biden, decided to abandon the country and allow the Taliban to take over again.

This is not looking like a good day for women's rights.

The United States came to the rescue before and women had 20 years of Western-style rights, but now that is over.


Here's a little history of women's rights in Afghanistan.
In 1921 the first school for girls was opened in the capital city.
In 1924 a law was passed allowing women to choose their own husbands.
In 1959 women no longer had to wear a veil.
In 1964 the Afghanistan government starts to come under international pressure to modernize their government and society.
In 1978 women get even more rights, the government is overthrown a year later by a Soviet-backed Communist Party.
In 1981 Afghanistan became a pawn between Soviet Russia and the United States.
In 1983 Islamic extremists from all different parts of the Muslim World were drawn to Afghanistan to take part in what they saw as a religious war for independence against the Soviets who were trying to suppress religion.
In 1996 the Taliban took power over the country.
In 2001 the United States invaded and removed the Taliban from government.
In 2009 under a new democratically elected government, the controversial Islamic-inspired Shia Personal Status Law was passed, which standardized family relations laws for Shia Muslim women in the country. In some ways this law helped give some women more rights, but took away rights from other women. For example, it specified that Shia women were required to submit to their husband's sexual demands and were expected to have intercourse with their husband every four days. Family issues had previously been decided by local customary law, so the law was considered an improvement for many women outside the capital city.
In 2021 the Taliban took power again, and sent public relations representatives promising that women would be able to do many things they were not allowed to do under the previous Taliban rule (from 1996 to 2001).
The Taliban used whips to break up a protest of feminist women.
Many women feared they would have to go back to wearing the burqa (full face covering).
The Taliban announced women will be required to wear the hijab, but so far will not be required to wear the burqa.
#15231870
They destroy the backbone oft the Afghan economy... The Opium cultivaton, frrom opium to heroin production made within Afghanistan. In the last years the Afghan cartells begun to produce semi-synthetic Methamphetamin from Ephedrine. They grow simple Ephedrin containing plants in huge fields...


Instead to tax heavy the drugtrade and get billions of cash... but this fanatics give a fuck about the hunger in the country a high mountain dessert.
Last edited by Sandzak on 05 Jun 2022 15:17, edited 1 time in total.
#15231878
Sadly, this is Afghanistan. 20 years of occupation didn't really change their tribalism and attitudes, let alone their culture. Staying another 20 years wouldn't have changed anything. Anyone who thought it would change was dreaming or delusional.

The Afghans knew this, which is why things changed so fast once US and everyone withdrew.
#15231899
Godstud wrote:Sadly, this is Afghanistan. 20 years of occupation didn't really change their tribalism and attitudes, let alone their culture.

Let alone their view of the West and its culture as a failure, or at least not convincing enough to them. :lol:

Godstud wrote:Staying another 20 years wouldn't have changed anything. Anyone who thought it would change was dreaming or delusional.

Indeed, they obviously wouldn't see much improvement. :lol:

Rancid wrote:The US should have never left Afghanistan? They should have stayed?

They obviously shouldn't have stayed, but they'll have to return after they've dealt with the rest of the world. No one can remain intact from the ultimate betterment of the world! :excited:
#15231902
Beren wrote:They obviously shouldn't have stayed, but they'll have to return after they've dealt with the rest of the world. No one can remain intact from the ultimate betterment of the world! :excited:


Of course, but @ckaihatsu seems to have a problem with the fact that it's a good thing the US left.
#15231906
Pants-of-dog wrote:Islamic extremists have been in Afghanistan for a very long time.

However, they did not achieve any significant power until they were funded, trained, and otherwise supported by the USA in its efforts to get rid of the Soviets. This aid continued until 1991.


How do you propose this is remedied?
#15231910
Rancid wrote:Of course, but ckaihatsu seems to have a problem with the fact that it's a good thing the US left.


Erm... actually I side with him this time.
"US leaving the place" already results in CCP is coming in and reap the profit at the expense of everyday Afghans.

Theoretically it would have been better if the US could strike some kind of cooperative relationship with the Taliban (ideal case is what South Korea or Japan is now), although I admit that the Taliban is keen to turn to CCP at its first opportunity, and to "solve" the problem I have something much more sinister in mind than ckaihatsu.
#15231911
Pants-of-dog wrote:Islamic extremists have been in Afghanistan for a very long time.

However, they did not achieve any significant power until they were funded, trained, and otherwise supported by the USA in its efforts to get rid of the Soviets. This aid continued until 1991.



So you think the US should have left the place to the Soviets? Well, I actually think it makes sense.
However, considering how the Soviet actually fared, it's more likely that Afghanistan would still be what it is today.

The only difference is probably:
1. WTC would not be torn down
2. Saddam and / or Gaddafi would not have collapsed as it did

Specific to the Afghan case, though, I think it's the Soviets who were to take the blame.
#15231914
Patrickov wrote:
Erm... actually I side with him this time.
"US leaving the place" already results in CCP is coming in and reap the profit at the expense of everyday Afghans.

Theoretically it would have been better if the US could strike some kind of cooperative relationship with the Taliban (ideal case is what South Korea or Japan is now), although I admit that the Taliban is keen to turn to CCP at its first opportunity, and to "solve" the problem I have something much more sinister in mind than ckaihatsu.


Then so be it. It's time for the world to understand how the ambitions and intentions of the CCP are far worse than anything western powers have tried since WWII.
#15231916
Rancid wrote:Then so be it. It's time for the world to understand how the ambitions and intentions of the CCP are far worse than anything western powers have tried since WWII.


Unfortunately Russia has run into the front before CCP has the "sense" to do that.

Meanwhile, anti-US apologists are beneficiaries of CCP so they will never listen, which I already concede a long time ago.
#15231925
Patrickov wrote:Erm... actually I side with him this time.
"US leaving the place" already results in CCP is coming in and reap the profit at the expense of everyday Afghans.

Theoretically it would have been better if the US could strike some kind of cooperative relationship with the Taliban (ideal case is what South Korea or Japan is now), although I admit that the Taliban is keen to turn to CCP at its first opportunity, and to "solve" the problem I have something much more sinister in mind than ckaihatsu.


@Patrickov :

Let me guess: it involves your favorite solution, mass murder. As longs as others are doing the killing and the dying, huh?

Disgusting.
#15231961
Rancid wrote:How do you propose this is remedied?


It would be nice if understanding the historical causes of a problem always led to a good solution.

Unfortunately for Afghan women, this is not the case this time. The most this does for us is allow us to speculate what might have been had the USSR and the USA left Afghanistan alone.

My ideal solution (democratic transition to socialism) is unrealistic due to the existing context of an authoritarian government opposed to Marxism.

At this point, the best that the West can do is to accept as many smart Afghani female refugees as possible. They can have educated and progressive families in the west and go back to Afghanistan in a sort of liberal demographic invasion.

————————

@Patrickov

If we look at the history, it seems that the rise of Islamic extremism in Afghanistan started after the USSR invasion, so ideally neither the USSR nor the US would have meddled, but that was never going to happen.
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