Why US citizens leave to live abroad--summary via video - Page 2 - Politics Forum.org | PoFo

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Provision of the two UN HDI indicators other than GNP.
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#15121797
Rancid wrote:I don't know if I would say the more the better, but 0% wouldn't be good.


I think the best place to live is where you can feel comfortable with your family.

My old neighborhood was changing in Denver. it became a gentrified neighborhood with a lot of upper middle class people and the old neighborhood changed completely. The property taxes went up and everything was not what it used to be. Plus, Denver when I moved in the 1980a used to be a medium-sized city and kind of tranquil and Western. Over time it became a young hipster, making a lot of money single person's paradise and the rents and prices on real estate skyrocketed. It was not my sort of town anymore. I never liked the snow and mountains.

I think also one grows older and you need something that is more about what you want out of life.

I like warm tropical weather and a slower pace but not too slow. I love a lot of cultural traditions; like museums, cultural events, theaters, festivals, events and history. I like character and deep roots and color and beauty. This city had that and more.

I also dislike EXPENSIVE places to live. Where you got to get two jobs full time to make the rent. That is stressful as hell.
#15121805
Tainari88 wrote:
I think the best place to live is where you can feel comfortable with your family.

My old neighborhood was changing in Denver. it became a gentrified neighborhood with a lot of upper middle class people and the old neighborhood changed completely. The property taxes went up and everything was not what it used to be. Plus, Denver when I moved in the 1980a used to be a medium-sized city and kind of tranquil and Western. Over time it became a young hipster, making a lot of money single person's paradise and the rents and prices on real estate skyrocketed. It was not my sort of town anymore. I never liked the snow and mountains.

I think also one grows older and you need something that is more about what you want out of life.

I like warm tropical weather and a slower pace but not too slow. I love a lot of cultural traditions; like museums, cultural events, theaters, festivals, events and history. I like character and deep roots and color and beauty. This city had that and more.

I also dislike EXPENSIVE places to live. Where you got to get two jobs full time to make the rent. That is stressful as hell.


Yea, that makes sense.

Where I grew up in Miami is becoming a gentrification target. I've never seen a white person live in my old neighborhood. My parent's backyard neighbors are white (I've never seen white people in the neighborhood while growing up). It's becoming clearer that my old neighborhood is the next gentrification target. Pretty sure my parents are going to feel uncomfortable when that happens. Though it will probably take a while. Maybe they won't care.

I guess for me, there isn't ever any one specific set of things that I want/need to be happy in a particular location. One thing my wife and I have noticed, is that we become bored with cities after a few years. Personally, we're pretty bored of Austin, but we stay because we think it's great for our kids and the really good job I have (and there are many good jobs in case I leave this one). Hence one of our retirement ideas is to live in a new city for 1-3 years at a time, and then just move on to the next. In each case, rent a small one bedroom apartment. Enjoy the city, move on to the next.

General things we like:
- Museums of all types. History, Art, Science, etc. Austin doesn't have many museums. Many art galleries though, but those aren't museums.
- Cultural events are great, we enjoy those.
- Near by state/national parks for camping and hiking.
- Good public transport
- I don't care about weather, but my wife likes warmer weather.
- Meeting new people.

The thing is, we get bored with going to the same museum, or the same festivals after a while. I guess what keeps up happy is constant change.
#15121964
Rancid wrote:Yea, that makes sense.

Where I grew up in Miami is becoming a gentrification target. I've never seen a white person live in my old neighborhood. My parent's backyard neighbors are white (I've never seen white people in the neighborhood while growing up). It's becoming clearer that my old neighborhood is the next gentrification target. Pretty sure my parents are going to feel uncomfortable when that happens. Though it will probably take a while. Maybe they won't care.

I guess for me, there isn't ever any one specific set of things that I want/need to be happy in a particular location. One thing my wife and I have noticed, is that we become bored with cities after a few years. Personally, we're pretty bored of Austin, but we stay because we think it's great for our kids and the really good job I have (and there are many good jobs in case I leave this one). Hence one of our retirement ideas is to live in a new city for 1-3 years at a time, and then just move on to the next. In each case, rent a small one bedroom apartment. Enjoy the city, move on to the next.

General things we like:
- Museums of all types. History, Art, Science, etc. Austin doesn't have many museums. Many art galleries though, but those aren't museums.
- Cultural events are great, we enjoy those.
- Near by state/national parks for camping and hiking.
- Good public transport
- I don't care about weather, but my wife likes warmer weather.
- Meeting new people.

The thing is, we get bored with going to the same museum, or the same festivals after a while. I guess what keeps up happy is constant change.


I have been to quite a few cities in your state Rancid. My favorites are Austin and Houston. Dallas and Fort Worth, and San Antonio are nice cities too.

If I had to pick a city to live in in Texas I would go for Houston and then Austin for sure.
#15121966
Tainari88 wrote:
I have been to quite a few cities in your state Rancid. My favorites are Austin and Houston. Dallas and Fort Worth, and San Antonio are nice cities too.

If I had to pick a city to live in in Texas I would go for Houston and then Austin for sure.



Ever been to Maine? Try August.
#15121969
@Tainari88

I am a big fan of American Tacos and have been watching a documentary on Tacos on Netflix. I tell you with the work ethic of those Mexicans who run their taco stands and taco restaurants and how hard they work, they could come up here to America and make a fortune running their own business.

And you want to talk about competition, down in Mexico, if you are in the taco business you have some very serious competition. They work very hard and their customers don't have to hardly wait for service or the food. The folks running those restaurants literally run to their customers to take their orders and run to bring their orders to the customers.

That being said I am quite at home in the USA and would very unlikely ever to leave unless under some pretty extreme circumstances. But I do like to travel and see some of the world like Spain or England or France or Germany or Greece or Australia for example. Just as a tourist on vacation though spending money and site seeing and learning about a different place and culture.
#15122045
Politics_Observer wrote:@Tainari88

I am a big fan of American Tacos and have been watching a documentary on Tacos on Netflix. I tell you with the work ethic of those Mexicans who run their taco stands and taco restaurants and how hard they work, they could come up here to America and make a fortune running their own business.

And you want to talk about competition, down in Mexico, if you are in the taco business you have some very serious competition. They work very hard and their customers don't have to hardly wait for service or the food. The folks running those restaurants literally run to their customers to take their orders and run to bring their orders to the customers.

That being said I am quite at home in the USA and would very unlikely ever to leave unless under some pretty extreme circumstances. But I do like to travel and see some of the world like Spain or England or France or Germany or Greece or Australia for example. Just as a tourist on vacation though spending money and site seeing and learning about a different place and culture.


Family businesses and micro-businesses are the bulk of Mexican economic activities Politics Observer. Mexicans have a very low minimum wage. Most Mexicans are mini entrepreneurs. This nation has never had welfare or food stamps. If you don't work your ass off all day you starve, you don't make the rent, you are royally screwed.

Mexicans are of extreme work ethic. That is what most Mexican families are composed of. Extreme work ethic. From the little kids to the adults. Nothing is free in Mexico. At the same time, Mexicans are fatalistic and many are deeply religious and are also incredibly generous. The poorest Mexicans are usually the ones who wind up taking care of sick relatives and babysitting kids in the it family for siblings or friends for free. They cooperate a lot.

Mexican women selling jewelry, services, even car wax (I bought some the other day), are outstanding salespeople. Just don't make them learn English. Lol. I got two friends in their twenties. Both women and they struggle through their English homework so much. They tell me, "Tainari, it doesn't make any sense. I don't want to cope with that language. It is hard. The spelling doesn't make any sense. They change the meaning of the vowels all the time. They don't give you hints on how to pronounce the word. It is terrible." I chuckle. I tell them tricks and tips to do well on their English homework and help them understand the grammar. They are reciprocal and they mop and clean and dust and fold....helping me out enormously.

I got a Cuban woman friend and she cooks and delivers Cuban food. Delicious. The whopping $2,50 cents is worth it. :D
#15122046
late wrote:Ever been to Maine? Try August.


I have been to Maine. Long long time ago as a teenager. Maybe 15 years old. Briefly. Rhode Island too. Gray skies, and New England winters I hate with a passion. Way too cold for me Late. What I like about New Englanders though is how forthright they are and they get to the point fast. Lol.

Mexicans are all about indirect communication and can take a lot of effort to figure out what they really mean by a sentence. Hee hee.

I like that blunt, upfront way the Maine Americans have. I would have liked to try out those lobster rolls they are so famous for.
#15122048
@Rancid I hear that Ecuador is a great place to live, especially if you want to live in Latin America.


Ecuador Voted The Best Place In The World To Live In Retirement
Paul Green, a spokesman for Surtrek South American Travel (www.surtrek.com), said: “My wife and I are currently renting a three-bedroom, comfortable apartment in the capital Quito’s safe yet bohemian village of Guápulo. We wake up daily to truly breathtaking mountain views through the bedroom window and our rent is a mere $200 (£129) a month.”

The 57-year-old semi-retired expat added that there were no heating bills given Ecuador’s warm climate, and a combined phone-internet-English channel TV package costs $50 (£32) a month.

This makes it affordable for him keep in touch with friends and family back home via Skype, Facebook and email.

He added: “A French neighbour of ours who works for the UN pays more than double what we do for a fully furnished place. It all depends on what you need and what you want to pay. Some say it’s half the cost of living in the US, while I would argue it’s even less to live here without compromising style and comfort.”

High-quality hospital care is also a major attraction, especially for retirees, while health insurance premiums are low for those who prefer not to use the subsidised public system.


https://www.businessinsider.com/ecuador ... lth%20care.
#15122049
Tainari88 wrote:
I have been to Maine. Long long time ago as a teenager. Maybe 15 years old. Briefly. Rhode Island too. Gray skies, and New England winters I hate with a passion. Way too cold for me Late. What I like about New Englanders though is how forthright they are and they get to the point fast. Lol.

Mexicans are all about indirect communication and can take a lot of effort to figure out what they really mean by a sentence. Hee hee.

I like that blunt, upfront way the Maine Americans have. I would have liked to try out those lobster rolls they are so famous for.



Most places that sell lobster rolls use frozen lobster.

Best to just get lobster.

However, if you want a lobster roll, start with making your own mayo, that takes anything you put it on to the next level.

Then again, I bet lobster tacos would be worth trying.
#15122075
late wrote:Most places that sell lobster rolls use frozen lobster.

Best to just get lobster.

However, if you want a lobster roll, start with making your own mayo, that takes anything you put it on to the next level.

Then again, I bet lobster tacos would be worth trying.




One of the most ancient techniques for barbequing in the Americas is a Mayan technique called in Mayan "Pib". It means to bury the pig or wild boar in the ground to cook it.

I think I will bring the video:




Pib is about wrapping in banana leaves and cooking it slowly underground. She does it with pork and chicken in this recipe.

Mayans are eaters of turkey since it is a very native meat. Turkey is Mexican. All turkeys are from the Americas. Especially in Mexico. Some of the best turkey based dishes are from Mexico.
#15122078
Tainari88 wrote:


One of the most ancient techniques for barbequing in the Americas is a Mayan technique called in Mayan "Pib". It means to bury the pig or wild boar in the ground to cook it.

I think I will bring the video:




Pib is about wrapping in banana leaves and cooking it slowly underground. She does it with pork and chicken in this recipe.

Mayans are eaters of turkey since it is a very native meat. Turkey is Mexican. All turkeys are from the Americas. Especially in Mexico. Some of the best turkey based dishes are from Mexico.


Who invented La Caja China?
#15122125
@Tainari88

I have it easy compared to the Mexicans. The more I learn about the Mexicans the more respect I have for them. Most of what I learned about Mexicans was from TV reports about drug cartels and gangs. But given the extreme poverty of Mexico that you describe, it makes sense why drug cartels and gangs would flourish down there because the cartel members and gangsters are looking for a way out of poverty. Plus, I can't imagine Mexicans would be as welcoming of Americans given Trump's rhetoric towards them in the last election. Trump made life harder for Americans who are abroad or would might consider traveling abroad.
#15122171
Politics_Observer wrote:Most of what I learned...

Snap!

Most of what I learned about Americans was from TV reports about drug cartels and gangs and the movies (Serpico, American Psycho, Silence of the Lambs and such).


:)
#15122175
Politics_Observer wrote:@Tainari88

I have it easy compared to the Mexicans. The more I learn about the Mexicans the more respect I have for them. Most of what I learned about Mexicans was from TV reports about drug cartels and gangs. But given the extreme poverty of Mexico that you describe, it makes sense why drug cartels and gangs would flourish down there because the cartel members and gangsters are looking for a way out of poverty. Plus, I can't imagine Mexicans would be as welcoming of Americans given Trump's rhetoric towards them in the last election. Trump made life harder for Americans who are abroad or would might consider traveling abroad.


Most immigrants in Mexico come through Comarc which is the program Mexico has for refugees. I talked extensively to my immigration lawyer today. I am paying him to help me get a work permit fast. Money moves the slow wheels of Mexican red government tape. Like it does in most nations.

Interesting he was telling me his story. He crossed the desert illegally into the USA and became successful but wasn't able to become a US citizen. He went back to Mexico, studied law and become a highly successful immigration lawyer. He grew up in stark poverty where his mother and he and his siblings lived in very hard poverty. He is an intelligent highly self made man. And he was telling me how if he had become a citizen of the US he would have been so proud. But he was not given the chance. I discussed Puerto Rico with him and a Cuban lady refugee in the back seat. In the end our conclusions was that being poor in many nations where there is no way of escaping poverty and there is no welfare state etc. Makes making a living extremely difficult.

Poverty creates a lot of problems Politics. A lot of Puerto Ricans leave Puerto Rico due to unemployment and poverty. Same with Mexico. Same with many places. How to combat that problem? Education, health and training and also investing in people. Ending racism and all its problems. It is a worldwide problem.

Mexicans are proud of their family. And love their family. He said his mother cried for the first time in happiness the day he took her on a world tour of European cities. They were under the Eiffel Tower in Paris, France and his mother was born in grinding poverty in a tiny town in Yucatan with not even a private bedroom to sleep in. And there she was with a grown son who spoke various languages with a prosperous law practice in immigration in Mexico living a dream and taking care of his elderly mother and so on....

He realized his destiny was back in Mexico. Not in the USA Politics. People live good lives in other nations. Eradicating poverty is the job of all.
#15122177
@Tainari88

Yeah, I know. I still would have liked to have had him as a U.S. citizen though. We could use some of these hard working Mexicans in our economy. I think it's a shame he couldn't become a U.S. citizen. I think it sucks and it hurts us here in America. I would have been proud to have had him as an American citizen.
#15122180
Politics_Observer wrote:look!

Haven't watched that one.

Based on what I've seen, you are all drugged up, institutionally corrupt, members of a transexual cannibal death cult.


:)
#15122183
@ingliz

Yeah, I know I get your point. But I guess we all fall under the influence of stereotyping and what we see on TV. That being said, as a Gringo, I think I would be wary of traveling to Mexico after Trump said some bad things about Mexicans. They might not welcome Americans after Trump's rhetoric. Know what I mean? I like to go to places where I know I will feel welcomed. If I am not welcomed, I don't want to go there. Trump might have created an unwelcoming environment for Americans, in Mexico, with his past rhetoric.
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