Huawei's Meng Wanzhou flies back to China after deal with US - Politics Forum.org | PoFo

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#15192113
A Chinese technology executive held in Canada on US fraud charges has left the country after a deal with prosecutors, following years of diplomatic tensions over her fate.

Meng Wanzhou, chief financial officer of Huawei, was detained on fraud charges in December 2018 at the request of the US.

On Friday, the US Department of Justice dropped an extradition request for her.

The case infuriated China and strained relations with the US and Canada.

It also prompted accusations that China had detained Canadian citizens in retaliation, which China denied.

"My life has been turned upside down. It was a disruptive time for me," Ms Meng told reporters after being freed from Canadian detention.

"Every cloud has a silver lining," she continued, adding: "I will never forget all the good wishes I received from people around the world."

Shortly afterwards she boarded an Air China flight bound for the Chinese city of Shenzhen, AFP news agency reports.


The deal, which recommended she be released, allowed her to formally deny guilt for key charges while also acknowledging the allegations laid out by the Americans.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-58682998

The case which U.S. brought was really weak, it was based on powerpoint slides and they accuse her of intentionally lying by omitting information of Huawei's dealing with Iran though its subsidiary while dealing with a British bank in Hong Kong, which caused the British bank to violate a U.S sanction that was no longer in existence at the time.

So all they could do is to get Meng to admit "wrong doing" without plead guilty in order to save the U.S some face.

That ends this nothingburger, albeit with some accompanying humiliation for America's hat. What a willful little puppet.
#15192115
:lol:

Your title is childishly inaccurate. You must be taking lessons from Reddit.

Canada has an extradition treating with the USA, as well as diplomatic relations with China and USA. It was a simple fraud case. This isn't indicative of any kind of international relations.

Get a clue instead of simply trolling anything and everything. You have nothing of substance to say. it is a 'nothingburger' as you put it. Why even bother commenting?
#15192117
Godstud wrote::lol:

Your title is childishly inaccurate. You must be taking lessons from Reddit.

Canada has an extradition treating with the USA, as well as diplomatic relations with China and USA. It was a simple fraud case. This isn't indicative of any kind of international relations.

Get a clue instead of simply trolling anything and everything. You have nothing of substance to say. it is a 'nothingburger' as you put it. Why even bother commenting?


It was a politically motivated detention at the behest of Canada's master. No way to dress it up as anything else. Being coerced into an unlawful detention is not part of the extradition treaty.
#15192148
Igor Antunov wrote:https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-58682998

The case which U.S. brought was really weak, it was based on powerpoint slides and they accuse her of intentionally lying by omitting information of Huawei's dealing with Iran though its subsidiary while dealing with a British bank in Hong Kong, which caused the British bank to violate a U.S sanction that was no longer in existence at the time.

So all they could do is to get Meng to admit "wrong doing" without plead guilty in order to save the U.S some face.

That ends this nothingburger, albeit with some accompanying humiliation for America's hat. What a willful little puppet.


How come the Canadians got released straight away if this was not hostage taking?

Do you support state sponsored terrorism?

You and some others were basically were saying that it wasn't the case.
#15192150
For one thing, even though the justice department may have felt they were doggedly acting on information about a potential breach of US sanctions law, Donald Trump made the case explicitly political by saying he would intervene to drop the charges if he thought it would help US-China trade negotiations.

China, meanwhile, felt Meng and Huawei were being used as a weapon in a wider battle. It was highly unusual for the prosecution to be directed at the chief finance officer personally and not at the corporation. Last year, Airbus agreed to pay $4bn in penalties to resolve a bribery case. In 2015, Deutsche Bank was fined $258m for violating Iran- and Syria-related sanctions. But no executives were detained in either case.
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/ ... t-analysis

Politically motivated prosecution.
#15192256
JohnRawls wrote:How come the Canadians got released straight away if this was not hostage taking?

Do you support state sponsored terrorism?

You and some others were basically were saying that it wasn't the case.



From what I see, those anti-US PoFo'ers (i.e. all posters who had posted in this thread up to this point except Godstud, Rugoz, you and me) are probably arguing that Canada and the US had been taking Meng as a hostage, and China was just "returning the favour".
#15192265
Patrickov wrote:From what I see, those anti-US PoFo'ers (i.e. all posters who had posted in this thread up to this point except Godstud, Rugoz, you and me) are probably arguing that Canada and the US had been taking Meng as a hostage, and China was just "returning the favour".

I would indeed call that a pretty accurate summary, Member @Patrickov.
#15192266
Like every country, China keeps tabs on foreigners that are engaged in espionage or committing minor crimes and picked them up when it was politically useful to do so. Better to keep eyes on the spy you know than immediately arrest him and have him potentially replaced by a spy you don't know. I'm sure these two guys with connections to the Canadian government, State Department funded NGOs, close contacts in North Korea, and who were immediately welcomed back into Canada by their intelligence service are perfectly innocent boys, and their names were drawn out of a hat at random out of thousands of Canadian citizens residing in China as teachers, businessmen, and so on. :roll:

Trading prisoners is also perfectly routine behavior between great powers. The US has done similarly - hell, Bolton and Trump both explicitly have stated that the arrest of Meng was on a technicality to create leverage for trade negotiations with China.

This is another Rudolf Abel - Gary Powers situation that the powers that be are trying to use as a propaganda piece to manufacture consent for their new cold war.

newswire.ca wrote:According to Bolton, Trump viewed Ms. Meng as a prominent Chinese citizen – "the Ivanka Trump of China," in the President's words – whose freedom could be a powerful bargaining chip in trade negotiations with China. As Bolton puts it: "…Trump believed everything was open in trade negotiations."

Bolton's recollection of events is supported by Trump's own public comments days after Ms. Meng's arrest: He said he would interfere politically in the case if it helped the U.S.-China relationship. "If I think it's good for what will be certainly the largest trade deal ever made – which is a very important thing – what's good for national security, I would certainly intervene if I thought it was necessary," the President said in December 2018.

In Donald Trump's eyes the charges against Ms. Meng have always been a bargaining chip to be used to negotiate a trade deal with China and enhance his chances at re-election in November.


Trump is gone and the arrest of a Canadian/Chinese citizen doing business with a Hong Kong bank in Iran for violating American sanctions that were not even in effect at the time of the alleged wrongdoing is no longer politically useful.
#15192272
Rugoz wrote:China sentenced Canadians to death because of this.

Fuck China. The concept of the rule of law is completely alien to these fuckers.

They were just following USA's lead. Just like when the USA innocently copied USSR's imperialism during the cold war. At least that was the apologetics you posted on the USA's behalf in the opinion poll earlier.
#15192281
Rugoz wrote:China sentenced Canadians to death because of this.

Fuck China. The concept of the rule of law is completely alien to these fuckers.


If it's any consolation

1. the most prominent Canadian sentenced to death is a drug dealing piece of shit that has destroyed countless lives, having shipped over 500kg of meth to Australia and East Asia.

And

2. China has a history of lessening sentences and removing death penalties at the last possible minute. If they were going to be killed they would have been already, the process takes just 2-5 weeks. Still breathing. Let them sweat for a few years.

So your concern is misplaced in a number of ways.
#15192284
I have very little pity for people who go to countries there they have horrific penalties for crimes, and they still choose to engage in them.

@Igor Antunov Good point.

China will never allow drug traffickers from any country to kill and poison its people: Chinese Embassy in Canada
Schellenberg was involved in organized international drug trafficking activities, smuggling 222.035 kilograms of methamphetamine with others. The amount of smuggled drugs is particularly large and, as the leading culprit, his behavior constitutes the crime of drug trafficking. The facts identified in the original judgment are clear, the evidence is true and sufficient, the conviction is accurate, the sentence is appropriate and the trial procedure is legal. “What qualifications does Canada have to make irresponsible remarks on the relevant Chinese court handling cases according to the law?” The Chinese embassy asked.

China is a friendly country and a country ruled by law. Whoever violates China's laws must be severely punished in accordance with it and no one is allowed to have the privilege of going over the law, the embassy said, stressing that nationality is not an excuse.

https://www.globaltimes.cn/page/202108/1231146.shtml

I do not support the death penalty, but I can understand why they make the penalties for these crimes so severe.

As for Meng Wanzhou. I doubt we'll know the real reason for anything related to this charade.
#15192315
Patrickov wrote:Even if it's the case, I don't think that threatening 4 Canadian citizens with death penalty is an equal "return of favour".

Looks like China believes Meng's freedom (or the information she holds) worths 4 Canadian lives.

I don't know all the details, and some members have mentioned that at least one of those Canadians was involved in some real drug trafficking activity.

I don't know that it was even a tit-for-tat, at all, look how many are languishing in American prisons for drug crimes. China is a big country, and it isn't shocking that there are Canadian drug dealers there, and it might have been totally unrelated, but who the fuck knows anymore.

That American tentacles reaching to other countries, and persecuting executives and stuff (I don't have much love for the rich, but come on), for 'violating US sanctions', based on technicalities and shit, and what the fuck are these 'sanctions' all about? That's the real issue. It just seems like a pile of bullshit to me.
#15192318
Igor Antunov wrote:https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-58682998

The case which U.S. brought was really weak, it was based on powerpoint slides and they accuse her of intentionally lying by omitting information of Huawei's dealing with Iran though its subsidiary while dealing with a British bank in Hong Kong, which caused the British bank to violate a U.S sanction that was no longer in existence at the time.

So all they could do is to get Meng to admit "wrong doing" without plead guilty in order to save the U.S some face.

That ends this nothingburger, albeit with some accompanying humiliation for America's hat. What a willful little puppet.

Ivan, don't worry the hans will get back what you stolen from them , very soon

#15192342
AFAIK wrote:They were just following USA's lead. Just like when the USA innocently copied USSR's imperialism during the cold war. At least that was the apologetics you posted on the USA's behalf in the opinion poll earlier.


Wtf are you even talking about? You either confuse me with somebody else or have a serious lack of reading comprehension.

As for "following USA's lead", there's a difference between prosecuting somebody for a crime (while the accused is free to live in her luxury villa), politically motivated or not, and convicting somebody on the order of political leaders. That woman was never convicted for anything, only judges would have been able to do that.

That's what you China-suckers don't get.

Godstud wrote:"China is a friendly country and a country ruled by law."


Friendly my ass and rule by law my ass.

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