The Popular Vote... - Page 13 - Politics Forum.org | PoFo

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#15045431
late wrote:
Recounts are a normal part of the process. You are implying it's a crisis, it simply is not.

The real answer to your objection are election standards enforced by an independent election authority. Most democracies have one that actually works, like the British Boundaries Commission.

We do not, and it's painfully clear we need one.

1st, going to a straight popular vote total is not really possible as of now.
OTOH, neither is my preferred system of adding 75 to 100 more EC votes that go to the popular vote winner.

2nd, name one nation the size of the US that has had a massive nationwide recount.

3rd, and it isn't really possible for the US to easily get your preferred solution of a national independent trustworthy authority to handle elections. It would take a constitutional amendment, right?

Right now the best bet is the plan to get enough states {states with 270+ EC votes are needed} to give all their EC votes to the winner of the popular vote.
By late
#15045435
Steve_American wrote:
1st, going to a straight popular vote total is not really possible as of now.
OTOH, neither is my preferred system of adding 75 to 100 more EC votes that go to the popular vote winner.

2nd, name one nation the size of the US that has had a massive nationwide recount.

3rd, and it isn't really possible for the US to easily get your preferred solution of a national independent trustworthy authority to handle elections. It would take a constitutional amendment, right?

Right now the best bet is the plan to get enough states {states with 270+ EC votes are needed} to give all their EC votes to the winner of the popular vote.



1) Of course.

2) If you want to make a point...

3) Again, of course.

4) Maybe, I haven't seen an analysis of how well that would work.

Aside from this issue, a democracy needs a strong independent voting authority. That would not require an amendment. We used to force countries to make strong and independent voting authorities. In 2000, when it became clear we not only didn't have one, our voting process was corrupt and deeply flawed, the world was rolling around on the floor, laughing hysterically.

The emperor had no clothes..
#15045676
late wrote:
1) Of course.

I wrote, "2nd, name one nation the size of the US that has had a massive nationwide recount."
you replied,
2) If you want to make a point...

My point was that I'm worried about the cost of a massive nationwide recount to count every single vote very carefully. I also worry about the time this would take.
You blew me off. You indicated it was no big deal. I'm asking there, "On what basis do you base your opinion that it is no big deal, have there ever been some really big nations that had a huge nationwide recount?" I also, wonder what the effect on the world's economy would be if the political & economic uncertainty continued for, say, 30 days.

3) Again, of course.

4) Maybe, I haven't seen an analysis of how well that would work.

Aside from this issue, a democracy needs a strong independent voting authority. That would not require an amendment. We used to force countries to make strong and independent voting authorities. In 2000, when it became clear we not only didn't have one, our voting process was corrupt and deeply flawed, the world was rolling around on the floor, laughing hysterically.

The emperor had no clothes..


You and I will just have to agree to disagree. To my mind, an Amendment is absolutely necessary for the Federal Gov. to establish a nationwide voting authority {independent or not}. The Constitution is clear. Voting is left to the states. An Amendment was required to change the voting age to 18 nationwide.
. . . An Amendment now is out of the question. I.e., not possible.
By late
#15045678
Steve_American wrote:
My point was that I'm worried about the cost of a massive nationwide recount to count every single vote very carefully.

I also worry about the time this would take.


You blew me off. You indicated it was no big deal. I'm asking there, "On what basis do you base your opinion that it is no big deal, have there ever been some really big nations that had a huge nationwide recount?" I also, wonder what the effect on the world's economy would be if the political & economic uncertainty continued for, say, 30 days.



You and I will just have to agree to disagree. To my mind, an Amendment is absolutely necessary for the Federal Gov. to establish a nationwide voting authority {independent or not}. The Constitution is clear. Voting is left to the states. An Amendment was required to change the voting age to 18 nationwide.
. . . An Amendment now is out of the question. I.e., not possible.



The cost doesn't matter. The process does.

One of the things the 2000 election showed us is that time doesn't matter, but the process does.

We live with that uncertainty in every election.

If you have a world class election process, the probability of a recount is quite small.

I'm not interested in sacrificing fairness for convenience.

We already have a national voting authority, the FEC, it simply needs teeth.

An amendment to abolish the EC would take time and some work. But my 2 cents is that it's one of the best things we could do for our country.
User avatar
By Drlee
#15045694
I also, wonder what the effect on the world's economy would be if the political & economic uncertainty continued for, say, 30 days.


Well we saw what would happen in 2000. We went much longer than that without a decision and nothing happened.

As to an amendment allowing a "national vote". The entire system is predicated on a local election process. We only have two national offices. President and Vice President. The rest are state offices. The president and vice president are essentially appointed by the states. A separate presidential election, unless it was entirely done by popular vote would be unnecessary.

Is the electoral system fair? Of course not. It was specifically designed to be unfair. It was absolutely conceived of and implemented to give rural voters a greater share of the pie than others in some misguided notion that they needed protection from the city folk. (And of course protect the institution of slavery.)

Today the electoral college is completely unnecessary unless you believe that some 18 year old in Wyoming should be allowed to cast a vote for national office that is the equal of 80 Californians. Sufficient protection for the interests of the smaller states exists in the senate without the electoral college. Indeed I could make a case for the notion that the senate is why we do not have even a nominal democracy in the US but then that is another discussion.
#15045710
some 18 year old in Wyoming should be allowed to cast a vote for national office that is the equal of 80 Californians.

Do we really have to go through the math on that again? :roll:
#15045714
blackjack21 wrote:Do we really have to go through the math on that again? :roll:


Drlee has a problem with an 18 year American voter but no problems with immigrant voters.

That is his pathway to eternal power, end the electoral college and have the sanctuary states decide every election.
User avatar
By Drlee
#15045745
Drlee has a problem with an 18 year American voter but no problems with immigrant voters.


You obviously have never read my posts on the subject. Or more likely, don't understand them.


That is his pathway to eternal power, end the electoral college and have the sanctuary states decide every election.


Nonsense. Right wing bullshit. Do read something about our government. Perhaps the, oh let's see, constitution. The electoral college only decides one election every four years. Do a quick google search "US Senate" if you want to understand why the electoral college can easily be discarded.

:roll:
By late
#15045754
Finfinder wrote:
In simple terms the electoral college is absolutely fair and intended to stop the centralization of power.



You do realise that the Machiavellian tactics are going to backfire on you when the kids (like AOC) come to power?
#15045770
late wrote:You do realise that the Machiavellian tactics are going to backfire on you when the kids (like AOC) come to power?


Do you realize president Trump has appointed 157 federal judges.

This is a comprehensive list of all Article III and Article IV United States federal judges appointed by Donald Trump during his presidency, as well as a partial list of Article I federal judicial appointments, excluding appointments to the District of Columbia judiciary.[1]

United States Supreme Court
Main article: Donald Trump Supreme Court candidates
See also: Neil Gorsuch Supreme Court nomination and Brett Kavanaugh Supreme Court nomination
# Justice Seat State Former Justice Nomination


1 Neil Gorsuch 9 Colorado Antonin Scalia February 1, 2017 April 7, 2017 54–45[SC 1] April 8, 2017 Incumbent
2 Brett Kavanaugh 1 Maryland Anthony Kennedy July 10, 2018 October 6, 2018 50–48[SC 2][V 1] October 6, 2018 Incumbent
United States Courts of Appeals
Denotes nomination pending before the Senate Judiciary Committee Denotes nomination reported by the Senate Judiciary Committee

# Judge Circuit Nomination
date Confirmation
date Confirmation
vote Began active
service Ended active
service Ended senior
status
1 Amul Thapar Sixth March 21, 2017 May 25, 2017 52–44[A 1] May 25, 2017 Incumbent –
2 John K. Bush Sixth May 8, 2017 July 20, 2017 51–47[A 2] July 21, 2017 Incumbent –
3 Kevin Newsom Eleventh May 8, 2017 August 1, 2017 66–31[A 3] August 2, 2017 Incumbent –
4 Ralph R. Erickson Eighth June 7, 2017 September 28, 2017 95–1[A 4] October 12, 2017 Incumbent –
5 Amy Coney Barrett Seventh May 8, 2017 October 31, 2017 55–43[A 5] November 2, 2017 Incumbent –
6 Joan Larsen Sixth May 8, 2017 November 1, 2017 60–38[A 6] November 2, 2017 Incumbent –
7 Allison H. Eid Tenth June 7, 2017 November 2, 2017 56–41[A 7] November 3, 2017 Incumbent –
8 Stephanos Bibas Third June 19, 2017 November 2, 2017 53–43[A 8] November 20, 2017 Incumbent –
9 Gregory G. Katsas D.C. September 7, 2017 November 28, 2017 50–48[A 9] December 8, 2017 Incumbent –
10 L. Steven Grasz Eighth August 3, 2017 December 12, 2017 50–48[A 10] January 3, 2018 Incumbent –
11 Don Willett Fifth October 3, 2017 December 13, 2017 50–47[A 11] January 2, 2018 Incumbent –
12 James C. Ho Fifth October 16, 2017 December 14, 2017 53–43[A 12] January 4, 2018 Incumbent –
13 David Stras Eighth May 8, 2017[Rn 1] January 30, 2018 56–42[A 13] January 31, 2018 Incumbent –
14 Elizabeth L. Branch Eleventh September 7, 2017[Rn 1] February 27, 2018 73–23[A 14] March 19, 2018 Incumbent –
15 Kyle Duncan Fifth October 2, 2017[Rn 1] April 24, 2018 50–47[A 15] May 1, 2018 Incumbent –
16 Kurt D. Engelhardt Fifth October 5, 2017[Rn 1] May 9, 2018 62–34[A 16] May 10, 2018 Incumbent –
17 Michael B. Brennan Seventh August 3, 2017[Rn 1] May 10, 2018 49–46[A 17] May 11, 2018 Incumbent –
18 Michael Y. Scudder Seventh February 15, 2018 May 14, 2018 90–0[A 18] May 21, 2018 Incumbent –
19 Amy J. St. Eve Seventh February 15, 2018 May 14, 2018 91–0[A 19] May 23, 2018 Incumbent –
20 Joel M. Carson III Tenth December 20, 2017 May 15, 2018 77–21[A 20] May 17, 2018 Incumbent –
21 John B. Nalbandian Sixth January 24, 2018 May 15, 2018 53–45[A 21] May 17, 2018 Incumbent –
22 Mark J. Bennett Ninth February 15, 2018 July 10, 2018 72–27[A 22] July 13, 2018 Incumbent –
23 Andy Oldham Fifth February 15, 2018 July 18, 2018 50–49[A 23] July 19, 2018 Incumbent –
24 Britt Grant Eleventh April 10, 2018 July 31, 2018 52–46[A 24] August 3, 2018 Incumbent –
25 A. Marvin Quattlebaum Jr. Fourth May 7, 2018 August 16, 2018 62–28[A 25] September 4, 2018 Incumbent –
26 Julius N. Richardson Fourth May 7, 2018 August 16, 2018 81–8[A 26] August 20, 2018 Incumbent –
27 David J. Porter Third April 12, 2018 October 11, 2018 50–45[A 27] October 15, 2018 Incumbent –
28 Ryan D. Nelson Ninth May 15, 2018 October 11, 2018 51–44[A 28] October 18, 2018 Incumbent –
29 Richard J. Sullivan Second May 7, 2018 October 11, 2018 79–16[A 29] October 17, 2018 Incumbent –
30 Jonathan A. Kobes Eighth June 11, 2018 December 11, 2018 51–50[A 30] December 12, 2018 Incumbent –
31 Eric D. Miller Ninth July 19, 2018[Rn 2] February 26, 2019 53–46[A 31] March 4, 2019 Incumbent –
32 Allison Jones Rushing Fourth August 27, 2018[Rn 2] March 5, 2019 53–44[A 32] March 21, 2019 Incumbent –
33 Chad Readler Sixth June 18, 2018[Rn 2] March 6, 2019 52–47[A 33] March 7, 2019 Incumbent –
34 Eric E. Murphy Sixth June 18, 2018[Rn 2] March 7, 2019 52–46[A 34] March 11, 2019 Incumbent –
35 Paul Matey Third April 12, 2018[Rn 2] March 12, 2019 54–45[A 35] March 18, 2019 Incumbent –
36 Neomi Rao D.C. November 14, 2018[Rn 2] March 13, 2019 53–46[A 36] March 18, 2019 Incumbent –
37 Bridget Shelton Bade Ninth August 27, 2018[Rn 2] March 26, 2019 78–21[A 37] April 1, 2019 Incumbent –
38 Joseph F. Bianco Second November 13, 2018[Rn 2] May 8, 2019 54–42[A 38] May 13, 2019 Incumbent –
39 Michael H. Park Second November 13, 2018[Rn 2] May 9, 2019 52–41[A 39] May 13, 2019 Incumbent –
40 Kenneth K. Lee Ninth November 13, 2018[Rn 3] May 15, 2019 52–45[A 40] June 12, 2019 Incumbent –
41 Daniel P. Collins Ninth November 13, 2018[Rn 3] May 21, 2019 53–46[A 41] May 22, 2019 Incumbent –
42 Daniel Aaron Bress Ninth February 6, 2019 July 9, 2019 53–45[A 42] July 26, 2019 Incumbent –
43 Peter J. Phipps Third May 13, 2019 July 16, 2019 56–40[A 43] July 17, 2019 Incumbent –
– Danielle J. Hunsaker Ninth September 19, 2019 – – – – –
– William J. Nardini Second September 19, 2019 – – – – –
– Halil Suleyman Ozerden Fifth June 24, 2019 – – – – –
– Steven Menashi Second September 9, 2019 – – – – –
– Barbara Lagoa Eleventh October 15, 2019 – – – – –
– Robert J. Luck Eleventh October 15, 2019 – – – – –
– Patrick J. Bumatay Ninth October 15, 2019[Rn 4] – – – – –
– Lawrence VanDyke Ninth October 15, 2019 – – – – –
United States District Courts
Denotes nomination pending before the Senate Judiciary Committee Denotes nomination reported by the Senate Judiciary Committee

# Judge Court
[Note 1] Nomination
date Confirmation
date Confirmation
vote Began active
service Ended active
service Ended senior
status
1 David Nye D. Idaho May 8, 2017[Rn 5] July 12, 2017 100–0[D 1] July 12, 2017 Incumbent –
2 Timothy J. Kelly D.D.C. June 7, 2017 September 5, 2017 94–2[D 2] September 8, 2017 Incumbent –
3 Scott L. Palk W.D. Okla. May 8, 2017[Rn 6] October 26, 2017 79–16[D 3] October 31, 2017 Incumbent –
4 Trevor N. McFadden D.D.C. June 7, 2017 October 30, 2017 84–10[D 4] October 31, 2017 Incumbent –
5 Donald C. Coggins Jr. D.S.C. August 3, 2017[Rn 7] November 16, 2017 96–0[D 5] November 20, 2017 Incumbent –
6 Dabney L. Friedrich D.D.C. June 7, 2017 November 27, 2017 97–3[D 6] December 1, 2017 Incumbent –
7 William L. Campbell Jr. M.D. Tenn. July 13, 2017 January 9, 2018 97–0[D 7] January 12, 2018 Incumbent –
8 Tommy Parker W.D. Tenn. July 13, 2017 January 10, 2018 98–0[D 8] January 30, 2018 Incumbent –
9 Michael Lawrence Brown N.D. Ga. July 13, 2017 January 11, 2018 92–0[D 9] January 17, 2018 Incumbent –
10 Walter David Counts III W.D. Tex. September 11, 2017[Rn 8] January 11, 2018 96–0[D 10] January 17, 2018 Incumbent –
11 A. Marvin Quattlebaum Jr. D.S.C. August 3, 2017 March 1, 2018 69–28[D 11] March 6, 2018 September 6, 2018 Elevated
12 Karen Gren Scholer N.D. Tex. September 7, 2017[Rn 9] March 5, 2018 95–0[D 12] March 6, 2018 Incumbent –
13 Tripp Self M.D. Ga. July 13, 2017 March 5, 2018 85–11[D 13] March 7, 2018 Incumbent –
14 Terry A. Doughty W.D. La. August 3, 2017 March 6, 2018 98–0[D 14] March 7, 2018 Incumbent –
15 Claria Horn Boom E.D. Ky.
W.D. Ky. June 12, 2017 April 10, 2018 96–1[D 15] April 11, 2018 Incumbent –
16 John W. Broomes D. Kan. September 7, 2017 April 12, 2018 voice vote[D 16] April 16, 2018 Incumbent –
17 Rebecca Grady Jennings W.D. Ky. September 7, 2017 April 12, 2018 voice vote[D 17] April 19, 2018 Incumbent –
18 Robert E. Wier E.D. Ky. August 3, 2017 June 5, 2018 95–0[D 18] June 12, 2018 Incumbent –
19 Fernando Rodriguez Jr. S.D. Tex. September 7, 2017 June 5, 2018 96–0[D 19] June 12, 2018 Incumbent –
20 Annemarie Carney Axon N.D. Ala. July 19, 2017[Rn 1] June 6, 2018 83–11[D 20] June 12, 2018 Incumbent –
21 Emily Coody Marks M.D. Ala. September 7, 2017[Rn 1] August 1, 2018 voice vote[D 21] August 3, 2018 Incumbent –
22 Jeff Beaverstock S.D. Ala. September 7, 2017[Rn 1] August 1, 2018 voice vote[D 22] August 3, 2018 Incumbent –
23 Holly Lou Teeter D. Kan. August 3, 2017[Rn 1] August 1, 2018 voice vote[D 23] August 3, 2018 Incumbent –
24 Colm Connolly D. Del. December 20, 2017[Rn 10] August 1, 2018 voice vote[D 24] August 3, 2018 Incumbent –
25 Maryellen Noreika D. Del. December 20, 2017 August 1, 2018 voice vote[D 25] August 9, 2018 Incumbent –
26 Jill Otake D. Haw. December 21, 2017 August 1, 2018 voice vote[D 26] August 3, 2018 Incumbent –
27 Terry F. Moorer S.D. Ala. September 7, 2017[Rn 1] August 28, 2018 voice vote[D 27] September 4, 2018 Incumbent –
28 R. Stan Baker S.D. Ga. September 7, 2017 August 28, 2018 voice vote[D 28] August 30, 2018 Incumbent –
29 Charles Barnes Goodwin W.D. Okla. July 13, 2017[Rn 1] August 28, 2018 52–42[D 29] August 30, 2018 Incumbent –
30 Barry W. Ashe E.D. La. October 2, 2017[Rn 1] August 28, 2018 voice vote[D 30] August 30, 2018 Incumbent –
31 James R. Sweeney II S.D. Ind. November 1, 2017 August 28, 2018 voice vote[D 31] September 13, 2018 Incumbent –
32 Susan Paradise Baxter W.D. Pa. December 20, 2017[Rn 11] August 28, 2018 voice vote[D 32] September 10, 2018 Incumbent –
33 Nancy E. Brasel D. Minn. February 15, 2018 August 28, 2018 voice vote[D 33] September 13, 2018 Incumbent –
34 Marilyn Jean Horan W.D. Pa. December 20, 2017[Rn 12] September 6, 2018 voice vote[D 34] September 19, 2018 Incumbent –
35 William F. Jung M.D. Fla. December 21, 2017[Rn 13] September 6, 2018 voice vote[D 35] September 10, 2018 Incumbent –
36 Kari A. Dooley D. Conn. December 20, 2017 September 6, 2018 voice vote[D 36] September 13, 2018 Incumbent –
37 Dominic W. Lanza D. Ariz. January 24, 2018 September 6, 2018 60–35[D 37] September 10, 2018 Incumbent –
38 C. J. Williams N.D. Iowa February 15, 2018 September 6, 2018 79–12[D 38] September 10, 2018 Incumbent –
39 Robert R. Summerhays W.D. La. January 24, 2018 September 6, 2018 voice vote[D 39] September 19, 2018 Incumbent –
40 Eric C. Tostrud D. Minn. February 15, 2018 September 6, 2018 voice vote[D 40] September 10, 2018 Incumbent –
41 Alan D. Albright W.D. Tex. January 24, 2018 September 6, 2018 voice vote[D 41] September 10, 2018 Incumbent –
42 William McCrary Ray II N.D. Ga. July 13, 2017[Rn 1] October 11, 2018 54–41[D 42] October 25, 2018 Incumbent –
43 Liles C. Burke N.D. Ala. July 19, 2017[Rn 1] October 11, 2018 55–40[D 43] October 17, 2018 Incumbent –
44 Michael J. Juneau W.D. La. August 3, 2017[Rn 1] October 11, 2018 54–41[D 44] October 17, 2018 Incumbent –
45 Mark Norris W.D. Tenn. July 13, 2017[Rn 1] October 11, 2018 51–44[D 45] November 8, 2018 Incumbent –
46 Eli J. Richardson M.D. Tenn. July 13, 2017[Rn 1] October 11, 2018 52–43[D 46] October 18, 2018 Incumbent –
47 Tom Kleeh N.D. W. Va. February 15, 2018 October 11, 2018 65–30[D 47] November 5, 2018 Incumbent –
48 Jeremy D. Kernodle E.D. Tex. January 23, 2018 October 11, 2018 voice vote[D 48] November 2, 2018 Incumbent –
49 Peter J. Phipps W.D. Pa. February 15, 2018 October 11, 2018 voice vote[D 49] October 17, 2018 July 22, 2019 Elevated
50 Susan Brnovich D. Ariz. January 24, 2018 October 11, 2018 voice vote[D 50] October 23, 2018 Incumbent –
51 Chad F. Kenney E.D. Pa. December 20, 2017 October 11, 2018 voice vote[D 51] October 24, 2018 Incumbent –
52 James Patrick Hanlon S.D. Ind. April 12, 2018 October 11, 2018 voice vote[D 52] November 5, 2018 Incumbent –
53 Lance E. Walker D. Me. April 10, 2018 October 11, 2018 voice vote[D 53] October 17, 2018 Incumbent –
54 Roy Altman S.D. Fla. May 7, 2018[Rn 2] April 4, 2019 66–33[D 54] April 9, 2019 Incumbent –
55 Daniel D. Domenico D. Colo. October 2, 2017[Rn 14] April 9, 2019 57–42[D 55] May 7, 2019 Incumbent –
56 Patrick Wyrick W.D. Okla. April 10, 2018[Rn 2] April 9, 2019 53–47[D 56] April 10, 2019 Incumbent –
57 Holly A. Brady N.D. Ind. April 10, 2018[Rn 2] April 10, 2019 56–42[D 57] April 16, 2019 Incumbent –
58 David S. Morales S.D. Tex. April 12, 2018[Rn 2] April 10, 2019 56–41[D 58] April 25, 2019 Incumbent –
59 J. Campbell Barker E.D. Tex. January 23, 2018[Rn 2] May 1, 2019 51–47[D 59] May 3, 2019 Incumbent –
60 Andrew L. Brasher M.D. Ala. April 10, 2018[Rn 2] May 1, 2019 52–47[D 60] May 3, 2019 Incumbent –
61 Rodolfo Ruiz S.D. Fla. May 7, 2018[Rn 2] May 2, 2019 90–8[D 61] May 3, 2019 Incumbent –
62 Raúl M. Arias-Marxuach D.P.R. April 12, 2018[Rn 2] May 2, 2019 95–3[D 62] May 13, 2019 Incumbent –
63 Joshua Wolson E.D. Pa. May 15, 2018[Rn 2] May 2, 2019 65–33[D 63] May 28, 2019 Incumbent –
64 Michael J. Truncale E.D. Tex. January 23, 2018[Rn 2] May 14, 2019 49–46[D 64] May 16, 2019 Incumbent –
65 Wendy Vitter E.D. La. January 23, 2018[Rn 2] May 16, 2019 52–45[D 65] May 29, 2019 Incumbent –
66 Howard C. Nielson Jr. D. Utah September 28, 2017[Rn 2] May 22, 2019 51–47[D 66] June 12, 2019 Incumbent –
67 Stephen R. Clark Sr. E.D. Mo. April 12, 2018[Rn 2] May 22, 2019 53–45[D 67] June 12, 2019 Incumbent –
68 Carl J. Nichols D.D.C. June 18, 2018[Rn 2] May 22, 2019 55–43[D 68] June 25, 2019 Incumbent –
69 Kenneth D. Bell W.D.N.C. April 12, 2018[Rn 2] May 22, 2019 55–43[D 69] June 12, 2019 Incumbent –
70 Rossie D. Alston Jr. E.D. Va. June 18, 2018[Rn 2] June 10, 2019 75–20[D 70] June 12, 2019 Incumbent –
71 Sarah D. Morrison S.D. Ohio April 12, 2018[Rn 2] June 11, 2019 89–7[D 71] June 14, 2019 Incumbent –
72 Pamela A. Barker N.D. Ohio April 12, 2018[Rn 2] June 12, 2019 91–5[D 72] June 18, 2019 Incumbent –
73 Corey L. Maze N.D. Ala. May 15, 2018[Rn 2] June 12, 2019 62–34[D 73] June 18, 2019 Incumbent –
74 Rodney Smith S.D. Fla. May 7, 2018[Rn 2] June 12, 2019 78–18[D 74] June 14, 2019 Incumbent –
75 Thomas P. Barber M.D. Fla. May 7, 2018[Rn 2] June 12, 2019 77–19[D 75] July 11, 2019 Incumbent –
76 J. P. Boulee N.D. Ga. August 28, 2018[Rn 2] June 12, 2019 85–11[D 76] June 14, 2019 Incumbent –
77 Matthew J. Kacsmaryk N.D. Tex. September 7, 2017[Rn 14] June 19, 2019 52–46[D 77] June 21, 2019 Incumbent –
78 Allen C. Winsor N.D. Fla. April 10, 2018[Rn 2] June 19, 2019 54–44[D 78] June 21, 2019 Incumbent –
79 James D. Cain Jr. W.D. La. August 28, 2018[Rn 2] June 19, 2019 77–21[D 79] June 25, 2019 Incumbent –
80 Greg G. Guidry E.D. La. January 17, 2019 June 19, 2019 53–46[D 80] June 21, 2019 Incumbent –
81 T. Kent Wetherell II N.D. Fla. May 7, 2018[Rn 2] July 10, 2019 78–15[D 81] July 12, 2019 Incumbent –
82 Nicholas Ranjan W.D. Pa. July 24, 2018[Rn 2] July 10, 2019 80–14[D 82] July 12, 2019 Incumbent –
83 Damon R. Leichty N.D. Ind. July 17, 2018[Rn 2] July 10, 2019 85–10[D 83] July 26, 2019 Incumbent –
84 Clifton L. Corker E.D. Tenn. November 13, 2018[Rn 2] July 18, 2019 55–39[D 84] July 22, 2019 Incumbent –
85 Wendy Williams Berger M.D. Fla. April 10, 2018[Rn 2] July 24, 2019 54–37[D 85] July 29, 2019 Incumbent –
86 Brian C. Buescher D. Neb. November 13, 2018[Rn 2] July 24, 2019 51–40[D 86] August 6, 2019 Incumbent –
87 Michael T. Liburdi D. Ariz. January 17, 2019 July 30, 2019 53–37[D 87] August 5, 2019 Incumbent –
88 Peter D. Welte D.N.D. January 17, 2019 July 30, 2019 68–22[D 88] August 5, 2019 Incumbent –
89 James Wesley Hendrix N.D. Tex. January 17, 2019[Rn 15] July 30, 2019 89–1[D 89] August 8, 2019 Incumbent –
90 Sean D. Jordan E.D. Tex. January 17, 2019 July 30, 2019 54–34[D 90] August 20, 2019 Incumbent –
91 Karin Immergut D. Ore. June 11, 2018[Rn 2] July 31, 2019 voice vote[D 91] August 5, 2019 Incumbent –
92 John Milton Younge E.D. Pa. July 17, 2018[Rn 16] July 31, 2019 voice vote[D 92] August 20, 2019 Incumbent –
93 Mary M. Rowland N.D. Ill. June 18, 2018[Rn 17] July 31, 2019 voice vote[D 93] August 20, 2019 Incumbent –
94 Mark T. Pittman N.D. Tex. January 17, 2019 July 31, 2019 54–36[D 94] August 5, 2019 Incumbent –
95 Jeff Brown S.D. Tex. March 11, 2019 July 31, 2019 50–40[D 95] September 4, 2019 Incumbent –
96 Brantley Starr N.D. Tex. March 11, 2019 July 31, 2019 51–39[D 96] August 6, 2019 Incumbent –
97 Jason K. Pulliam W.D. Tex. March 5, 2019 July 31, 2019 54–36[D 97] August 5, 2019 Incumbent –
98 Martha M. Pacold N.D. Ill. June 11, 2018[Rn 18] July 31, 2019 87–3[D 98] August 19, 2019 Incumbent –
99 William S. Stickman IV W.D. Pa. May 13, 2019 July 31, 2019 56–34[D 99] August 5, 2019 Incumbent –
100 Stephanie L. Haines W.D. Pa. March 5, 2019 September 11, 2019 94–0[D 100] September 30, 2019 Incumbent –
101 Ada E. Brown N.D. Tex. March 26, 2019 September 11, 2019 80–13[D 101] September 13, 2019 Incumbent –
102 Steven D. Grimberg N.D. Ga. April 4, 2019 September 11, 2019 75–18[D 102] September 13, 2019 Incumbent –
103 Steven C. Seeger N.D. Ill. June 18, 2018[Rn 17] September 11, 2019 90–1[D 103] September 13, 2019 Incumbent –
104 Mary S. McElroy D.R.I. April 12, 2018[Rn 19] September 11, 2019 voice vote[D 104] September 30, 2019 Incumbent –
105 Stephanie A. Gallagher D. Md. June 11, 2018[Rn 20] September 11, 2019 voice vote[D 105] September 13, 2019 Incumbent –
106 Frank W. Volk S.D. W. Va. April 4, 2019 October 16, 2019 92–0[D 106] October 17, 2019 Incumbent –
107 Charles R. Eskridge III S.D. Tex. May 13, 2019 October 16, 2019 61–31[D 107] October 17, 2019 Incumbent –
108 David J. Novak E.D. Va. March 26, 2019[Rn 21] October 16, 2019 89–3[D 108] October 17, 2019 Incumbent –
109 Rachel P. Kovner E.D.N.Y. May 15, 2018[Rn 22] October 16, 2019 88–3[D 109] October 17, 2019 Incumbent –
110 Justin R. Walker W.D. Ky. June 24, 2019 October 24, 2019 50–41[D 110] October 25, 2019 Incumbent –
– Lee Rudofsky E.D. Ark. July 8, 2019 – – – – –
– Jennifer P. Wilson M.D. Pa. May 13, 2019 – – – – –
– Gary Richard Brown E.D.N.Y. May 15, 2018[Rn 23] – – – – –
– Diane Gujarati E.D.N.Y. May 15, 2018[Rn 24] – – – – –
– Lewis J. Liman S.D.N.Y. May 15, 2018[Rn 22] – – – – –
– Eric R. Komitee E.D.N.Y. May 15, 2018[Rn 22] – – – – –
– John Sinatra W.D.N.Y. May 15, 2018[Rn 22] – – – – –
– Mary Kay Vyskocil S.D.N.Y. May 15, 2018[Rn 22] – – – – –
– Stanley Blumenfeld C.D. Cal. November 13, 2018[Rn 3] – – – – –
– Philip M. Halpern S.D.N.Y. November 13, 2018[Rn 2] – – – – –
– Matthew W. McFarland S.D. Ohio November 13, 2018[Rn 2] – – – – –
– Jeremy B. Rosen C.D. Cal. November 13, 2018[Rn 3] – – – – –
– Mark C. Scarsi C.D. Cal. November 13, 2018[Rn 3] – – – – –
– Robert J. Colville W.D. Pa. March 5, 2019[Rn 25] – – – – –
– Stephanie D. Davis E.D. Mich. March 11, 2019 – – – – –
– Douglas R. Cole S.D. Ohio May 13, 2019 – – – – –
– Kea W. Riggs D.N.M. May 13, 2019 – – – – –
– David B. Barlow D. Utah June 12, 2019 – – – – –
– Kevin R. Sweazea D.N.M. June 12, 2019 – – – – –
– John F. Kness N.D. Ill. June 24, 2019 – – – – –
– R. Austin Huffaker Jr. M.D. Ala. July 8, 2019 – – – – –
– Jodi W. Dishman W.D. Okla. September 9, 2019 – – – – –
– Karen S. Marston E.D. Pa. September 9, 2019 – – – – –
– Richard E. Myers II E.D.N.C. September 9, 2019 – – – – –
– Sarah Pitlyk E.D. Mo. September 9, 2019 – – – – –
– Anuraag Singhal S.D. Fla. September 9, 2019 – – – – –
– Daniel M. Traynor D.N.D. September 19, 2019 – – – – –
– Silvia Carreño-Coll D.P.R. October 15, 2019 – – – – –
– John M. Gallagher E.D. Pa. October 15, 2019 – – – – –
– Barbara Bailey Jongbloed D. Conn. October 15, 2019 – – – – –
– Cory T. Wilson S.D. Miss. October 15, 2019 – – – – –
– Sherri Lydon D.S.C. October 15, 2019 – – – – –
– Scott H. Rash D. Ariz. October 15, 2019 – – – – –
– Fernando L. Aenlle-Rocha C.D. Cal. October 17, 2019 – – – – –
– Adam L. Braverman S.D. Cal. October 17, 2019 – – – – –
– Bernard M. Jones W.D. Okla. October 17, 2019 – – – – –
– Sandy N. Leal C.D. Cal. October 17, 2019 – – – – –
– Shireen Matthews S.D. Cal. October 17, 2019 – – – – –
– Rick Richmond C.D. Cal. October 17, 2019 – – – – –
– Todd W. Robinson S.D. Cal. pending – – – – –
– John W. Holcomb C.D. Cal. pending – – – – –
– Knut S. Johnson S.D. Cal. pending – – – – –
– Steve Kim C.D. Cal. pending – – – – –
– Michelle M. Pettit S.D. Cal. pending – – – – –
– Joshua M. Kindred D. Alaska pending – – – – –
– Jennifer P. Togliatti D. Nev. pending – – – – –
United States Court of International Trade
Denotes nomination pending before the Senate Judiciary Committee Denotes nomination reported by the Senate Judiciary Committee

# Judge Nomination
date Confirmation
date Confirmation
vote Began active
service Ended active
service Ended senior
status
1 M. Miller Baker June 18, 2018[Rn 2] August 1, 2019 voice vote[IT 1] – – –
2 Timothy M. Reif June 18, 2018[Rn 2] August 1, 2019 voice vote[IT 2] August 8, 2019 Incumbent –
– Stephen Vaden October 17, 2019 – – – – –
Specialty courts (Article I)
User avatar
By Rancid
#15045780
Finfinder wrote:In simple terms the electoral college is absolutely fair and intended to stop the centralization of power.


If over 60% of your population lives in a city or suburb. Is it really a centralization of power?

What happens when 90%+ of population are in cities and suburbs?
User avatar
By Verv
#15045781
If they were to move to making the popular vote the sole determiner of the election, it would change the very nature of how everyone campaigned for President.

Moreover, it would fundamentally change the relationships that many states had with the President and with the Federal government as a whole. It would also fundamentally alter the initial deal that was cut with the states.

If you force a situation where only the popular vote matters, there should be a 100 year grace period or so where any state who doesn't really like the new system is free to breakaway from the United States without any manner of response, including retaliatory tariffs, and we should negotiate very fair deals that would essentially allow them to continue functioning as an economic part of the United States if they so desired and agreed to also reciprocate with us economically.

It would only be fair to people who no longer enjoyed any balance of power in their own country.

Plus, I want to be able to menacingly spit snus out of my mouth at the shoes of some coastal degenerate and mutter "You ain't from around here, are ya?" but then the tone suddenly shifts and I start killing them with niceness like a proper upper Midwesterner, but it is a niceness undercut by something that is left unsaid and betrayed by a lack of energy in movement or spark in the eyes; for it is known that the people of the wild north all carry within themselves anEdvard Munch painting, full of melancholia and regret and the foreboding feeling that nothing can ever be fixed.
By late
#15045785
Finfinder wrote:
Do you realize president Trump has appointed 157 federal judges.



Yeah, McConnell is scum.

But it won't work, anymore than it did during the Great Depression.

Since the Great Depression, we have spent enormous amounts of money on poor and rural areas. We didn't have to do that. By making us your enemy, you're shooting yourself just below the belt.
User avatar
By Finfinder
#15045817
Rancid wrote:If over 60% of your population lives in a city or suburb. Is it really a centralization of power?

What happens when 90%+ of population are in cities and suburbs?


Homelessness, disease, crime, and economic instability, look no further than the state of the long standing Democrat run cities.
User avatar
By Rancid
#15045819
Finfinder wrote:Homelessness, disease, crime, and economic instability, look no further than the state of the long standing Democrat run cities.


That doesn't answer my question at all.

What is it with the likes of you, hindsight, and blackjack, being totally unable to answer a fucking question?

The fascinating things is that you actually think you've answered the question.
User avatar
By Verv
#15045822
I think that green technology and green consciousness could potentially lead to a decrease in the importance of urban centers.

Of course, that is not happening now, but I am talking about the long-term. We could see an emphasis on decentralization and limiting face-to-face meetings. There might be a greater emphasis on having people grow their own food.

And what about a post-scarcity economy? We are not there, but UBI is apparently being taken seriously by many people. There have already been experiments with it. Imagine a scenario where we have something similar -- we would probably structure it so that there is a greater balance and incentivize moving to low population areas. Moreover, low population areas are much cheaper.

Would you rather spend 90% of your UBI on rent & food in NYC, or would you rather spend 30% of your income on rent & food in Slickpoo, Idaho?

Yeah, if you are some 20 year old scumdog, sure, you want to go be IN DUH CLUB, but if you are a parent or a bookworm who likes nature (like the model human being should be), you will choose Slickpoo.
User avatar
By Drlee
#15045823
Homelessness, disease, crime, and economic instability, look no further than the state of the long standing Democrat run cities.


:lol:

Trump would be so proud of you. You just parroted the garbage he wants the dumber of his followers to believe. Guess it worked.

I live in a bright red city and work with homeless folks. If you think that homelessness, disease and crime are democrat created issues you are out of your mind. But it is an easy sell to say it when the people you are speaking to could not pour piss out of a boot with the instructions on the heel.
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