Russia unveils 5th Generation fighter - Politics Forum.org | PoFo

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#15181986


Russia Unveils Fifth-Generation Fighter Jet To Take On F-22s, F-35s
The "Checkmate" is capable of hitting six targets at once and has low radar visibility.

Russian state aircraft manufacturer Rostec unveiled a fifth-generation fighter jet at the MAKS-2021 International Aviation and Space Salon in Zhukovsky, a couple of hours drive from the capital city of Moscow. The aircraft, dubbed as 'Checkmate' and pegged as a competitor to the F-35 aircraft, was unveiled after a local media campaign, targeted to increase public interest in the unveiling.

Designed by Sukhoi, the fighter has a single engine and is classified as a Light Tactical Aircraft. However, the advanced onboard instruments and the technical capabilities of the aircraft ensure that it finds a place under the fifth generation of fighter jets, competing with the USAF's F-22 Raptor and F-35 Lightning II, Chinese Chengdu J-20, and Russia's own Sukhoi Su-57. All the aforementioned aircraft are twin-engine jets, making the single-engine, Checkmate, a pocket-friendly option for nations interested in acquiring advanced fighter jets.

While the finer details of the aircraft were not released, Rostec claims that the aircraft will be capable of hitting Mach 2 (two times the speed of sound), have a range of 1800 miles (3000 km), and a payload capacity of 16,300 pounds (7400 kg or seven tons), ABC News reported.

The aircraft is also capable of hitting six targets at once and has low radar visibility, along with a high thrust-to-weight ratio offering shortened take-off and landing while also carrying advanced weapons. The pilots will be assisted with artificial intelligence while incorporating features of previous designs to reduce costs. In the future, the manufacturer will introduce a pilotless version of the aircraft as well.

Each aircraft is expected to be priced at US$ 25-30 million, while the manufacturer will also be accommodative of customer needs. At prices, seven times lower than the F-35s, Russia expects countries in Latin America, Middle East, and Asia to procure place orders for 300 aircraft in the coming days. First orders are expected to be delivered starting 2026.

CNN reported that the Checkmate is expected to put Russia back on the exporter's list of fighter jets after lagging for many years. The country remains in contention as a developer of advanced missiles, after testing its hypersonic cruise missile, Tsirkon, recently.

https://interestingengineering.com/russ ... k3-RiBXNuk
#15182011
Sandzak wrote:https://youtu.be/PNDrTSDmaZY

Russia Unveils Fifth-Generation Fighter Jet To Take On F-22s, F-35s
The "Checkmate" is capable of hitting six targets at once and has low radar visibility.

Russian state aircraft manufacturer Rostec unveiled a fifth-generation fighter jet at the MAKS-2021 International Aviation and Space Salon in Zhukovsky, a couple of hours drive from the capital city of Moscow. The aircraft, dubbed as 'Checkmate' and pegged as a competitor to the F-35 aircraft, was unveiled after a local media campaign, targeted to increase public interest in the unveiling.

Designed by Sukhoi, the fighter has a single engine and is classified as a Light Tactical Aircraft. However, the advanced onboard instruments and the technical capabilities of the aircraft ensure that it finds a place under the fifth generation of fighter jets, competing with the USAF's F-22 Raptor and F-35 Lightning II, Chinese Chengdu J-20, and Russia's own Sukhoi Su-57. All the aforementioned aircraft are twin-engine jets, making the single-engine, Checkmate, a pocket-friendly option for nations interested in acquiring advanced fighter jets.

While the finer details of the aircraft were not released, Rostec claims that the aircraft will be capable of hitting Mach 2 (two times the speed of sound), have a range of 1800 miles (3000 km), and a payload capacity of 16,300 pounds (7400 kg or seven tons), ABC News reported.

The aircraft is also capable of hitting six targets at once and has low radar visibility, along with a high thrust-to-weight ratio offering shortened take-off and landing while also carrying advanced weapons. The pilots will be assisted with artificial intelligence while incorporating features of previous designs to reduce costs. In the future, the manufacturer will introduce a pilotless version of the aircraft as well.

Each aircraft is expected to be priced at US$ 25-30 million, while the manufacturer will also be accommodative of customer needs. At prices, seven times lower than the F-35s, Russia expects countries in Latin America, Middle East, and Asia to procure place orders for 300 aircraft in the coming days. First orders are expected to be delivered starting 2026.

CNN reported that the Checkmate is expected to put Russia back on the exporter's list of fighter jets after lagging for many years. The country remains in contention as a developer of advanced missiles, after testing its hypersonic cruise missile, Tsirkon, recently.

https://interestingengineering.com/russ ... k3-RiBXNuk


Cool but how many have they actually produced that follow the full spec? Also what of the electronic and combat systems onboard?

Russian planes always had problems with electronics, radar, command and control and so on suits not the actual frame of the plane or the engines. Nowadays it is all about who sees who first, who can launch from further distance and so on. Simply flying high or fast is not good enough anymore.
#15182107
@JohnRawls

You don't want to over-rely on technology as a fighter pilot or ground soldier. As a fighter pilot, plane maneuverability, an air to air cannon along with with good dog fighting skills as a fighter pilot is important. The Mig-15 was a better plane in the Korean War than most U.S. planes but the Ameriacn fighter pilots had more skills than the Soviet and North Korean fighter pilots and thus more Mig-15s were shot down despite it being a better plane. Still, had those pilots (Soviet and North Korean pilots that flew on combat missions during the Korean War) had the same skill level as American pilots, then American pilots would have been in a world of shit in the Korean War because the Mig-15 was a better plan than most allied planes at that time.

Much like an infantry soldier needs to be well skilled in hand to hand combat too in case they deal with an enemy that ambushes and surprises them with close in hand to hand combat to negate any firepower advantages an army might have (can't call in artillery or air strikes in a hand to hand fight without killing your own men). So, these skills are still very much important today for fighters pilots or infantry soldiers (hand to hand close in and personal fighting skills for infantry soldiers).
#15182111
Politics_Observer wrote:@JohnRawls

You don't want to over-rely on technology as a fighter pilot or ground soldier. As a fighter pilot, plane maneuverability, an air to air cannon along with with good dog fighting skills as a fighter pilot is important. The Mig-15 was a better plane in the Korean War than most U.S. planes but the Ameriacn fighter pilots had more skills than the Soviet and North Korean fighter pilots and thus more Mig-15s were shot down despite it being a better plane. Still, had those pilots (Soviet and North Korean pilots that flew on combat missions during the Korean War) had the same skill level as American pilots, then American pilots would have been in a world of shit in the Korean War because the Mig-15 was a better plan than most allied planes at that time.

Much like an infantry soldier needs to be well skilled in hand to hand combat too in case they deal with an enemy that ambushes and surprises them with close in hand to hand combat to negate any firepower advantages an army might have (can't call in artillery or air strikes in a hand to hand fight without killing your own men). So, these skills are still very much important today for fighters pilots or infantry soldiers (hand to hand close in and personal fighting skills for infantry soldiers).


This is old mentality. This is not WW2, Korea or Vietnam. Nowadays it is all about who detects who first. Who can launch from farther away and if the rocket can hit or can be jammed and so on. If your plane does it better than the other plane then your plane is superior no matter the price. Good to have is information exchange between planes to remove the "Fog of War" for the military as a system or machine. And finally there is the pilot training to be able to use all that equipment which basically is pilot life > plane life. Training a pilot is a very long and costly process nowadays.

TLDR: Just overwhelming somebody with T34s in the sky is not going to work against any half competent military opponent anymore especially if ground Anti-Aircraft is involved to any degree.
#15182118
@JohnRawls

During the recent wars I know British and American soldiers went hand to hand with the enemy at times. Some things about warfare never change despite technological advances. Some skills are timeless in my view. Surface to Air Missiles are a very serious threat to pilots in the sky, but there is also a cat and mouse game between SAM battery operators and fighter pilots whose job it is to hunt those SAM missile sites down and destroy them. There are planes and tactics that have been developed by both SAM missile battery operators and planes designed to destroy those missile batteries. And thus, we see the evolution of these tactics and the cat and mouse game played between the pilot and SAM missile battery operator where each tries to destroy the other.

A lot of people are aware of the fact that SAM batteries are a serious threat to fighter pilots but most people aren't aware of the fact that their are planes specifically designed to hunt down and destroy those SAM batteries. This played out a lot during the Vietnam War when the U.S. lost planes to SAM missile batteries operated by Soviet crews but then flipped the script on the Soviet crews by developing and designing planes specifically designed to go after SAM missile batteries.

This made it to where Soviet SAM missile operators had to be careful about when to turn on their radars in their attempt to shoot down American bombers as they could give away their position for the SAM hunting planes to zero in on them and attack. So, both sides developed tactics to counter the other in this cat and mouse game that ensued in Vietnam. And plane on plane combat can be very much the same too where it can turn into a cat and mouse game and tactics evolve based on the technologies and capabilities of both sides as well as the skills of the pilots. But it's still very much the case today that these "old school" principles of warfare are still very much relevant and important today.

This new Russian plane may or may not be a better plane than the F-22. I don't know and I really don't think anybody knows for sure until they meet each other in combat in the skies. But I am sure a foe could develop tactics to close in on planes with technology that can see other planes hundreds of miles away for a close in dog fight to the surprise of the high tech plane with this capability. This is why such old school dog fighting skills and having a very maneuverable plane like the Mig-15 for example is still relevant today to win air wars in the sky despite technological advances. You don't want to neglect "old school" skills despite technology rapidly advancing.
#15182126
Too much to reply to in one post unless I want to dig a bunch of crap up. I just finished a bike ride, and going to do lunch once my appetite comes back.

Anyway... Russian planes usually don't deliver what they've promised.

Next, in my distinctly unhumble opinion, nobody is making 5th gen yet. I think of of the F35 as 4.5 gen...

When this plane starts showing up at air shows, or combat, we'll get an idea of what it's capabilities are. Don't get your hopes up.

My gut is not an aviation expert. So with that disclaimer out of the way, my gut is telling me this is a F15 and F16 hunter.

Even if it's better than I think, numbers are important. The guy with the most planes in the air usually wins. Russia's budget looks like a bear, that a tank ran over. They're not going to be buying many truly advanced aircraft, because they don't come cheap.

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