Before The Reformation In Scotland - Politics Forum.org | PoFo

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End of Roman society, feudalism, rise of religious power, beginnings of the nation-state, renaissance (476 - 1492 CE).
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#14322839
I heard somewhere that most of the Catholics in Scotland descend from Irish immigrants or from highlanders.

Before the reformation and Scotland's conversion to Protestantism, were most of the native Scots, both highlander and lowlander Catholic or were there still divisions?
#14323141
Well, before the Reformation, there were no other churches in the West. However, the Scottish Reformation didn't officially happen until 1560, more than 40 years after Luther's Ninety-Five Theses were published. Much like in other countries, Protestantism spread, but officially, Scotland was still Catholic for a long time. I don't know how the spread of Protestantism broke down between the various ethnic groups, though.
#14323576
Heisenberg wrote:Well, before the Reformation, there were no other churches in the West. However, the Scottish Reformation didn't officially happen until 1560, more than 40 years after Luther's Ninety-Five Theses were published. Much like in other countries, Protestantism spread, but officially, Scotland was still Catholic for a long time. I don't know how the spread of Protestantism broke down between the various ethnic groups, though.


I see. Therefore we can say that before Protestantism emerged Scotland was a majority Catholic country, even in the lowlands? Would most of the Presbyterians of today have had Catholic ancestors?

I also heard that there was a Celtic Church. Did it get absorbed into the Roman Church?

The Clockwork Rat wrote:Paganism was usually blended with Catholicism, especially in the Highlands and Islands, and this mix was a constant thorn in reformers' sides. The clan communities were long referred to as heathens.


I think this was the case in a lot of countries. They blended paganism to make the transition to Christianity easier.
#14323605
Political Interest wrote:I see. Therefore we can say that before Protestantism emerged Scotland was a majority Catholic country, even in the lowlands? Would most of the Presbyterians of today have had Catholic ancestors?

If you go back far enough, yeah. Protestantism arose from within the Catholic Church, after all.

Political Interest wrote:I also heard that there was a Celtic Church. Did it get absorbed into the Roman Church?

Celtic Christianity was more of a set of traditions and customs than a Church in its own right. During the early years of Christianity, there was very little standardisation of liturgy, or even the acceptance of Rome as the centre of Christendom. Celtic Christians were not particularly unique in having distinct practices from other parts of the world, but they wouldn't really have constituted a separate Church because of that. By the time of the Reformation, though, Britain and Ireland had been a part of the Roman church for several centuries.

layman wrote:Also, it was calvinist.

Damn straight.
#14325573
Heisenberg wrote:If you go back far enough, yeah. Protestantism arose from within the Catholic Church, after all.


Was this the case even in the lowlands? How far back do you have to go? Was Scotland mostly Catholic in the 1400s?

Heisenberg wrote:Celtic Christianity was more of a set of traditions and customs than a Church in its own right. During the early years of Christianity, there was very little standardisation of liturgy, or even the acceptance of Rome as the centre of Christendom. Celtic Christians were not particularly unique in having distinct practices from other parts of the world, but they wouldn't really have constituted a separate Church because of that. By the time of the Reformation, though, Britain and Ireland had been a part of the Roman church for several centuries.


By what time had the Celtic Church been fully assimilated into the Roman one in Scotland?
#14325579
Political Interest wrote:Was this the case even in the lowlands? How far back do you have to go? Was Scotland mostly Catholic in the 1400s?

Yes. Pretty much all of Western Europe was.

Political Interest wrote:By what time had the Celtic Church been fully assimilated into the Roman one in Scotland?

The Celtic Church was never separate from Rome - it just had some different traditions (most notably, regarding the dating of Easter). The "full" unification occurred over a period of maybe 20-30 years in the 8th century, when the Easter dating was brought into line with Rome. The British and Irish churches were still in communion with the Pope before that, though.

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