The Progressive Puritans - Politics Forum.org | PoFo

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Early modern era & beginning of the modern era. Exploration, enlightenment, industrialisation, colonisation & empire (1492 - 1914 CE).
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#15243134
The Puritans of colonial America have a reputation for being finger-wagging prudes, conducting witch hunts and being the template for The Handmaid's Tale.

Yet, “The word ‘puritan’ smothers what might otherwise be a natural interest in colonial New England as the most progressive society in the world at the time,” notes Marilynne Robinson in her article “One Manner of Law” in the August 2022 issue of Harper’s Magazine.

The Massachusetts Body of Liberties, drafted in 1641, “substantially anticipated the Bill of Rights.” Provisions of the Body of Liberties included the phrase “Every person within this Jurisdiction whether inhabitant or foreigner shall enjoy the same justice and law”.

A notable Puritan of the time, chaplain Hugh Peters, argued that the state should “have a stock readie” to protect the poor from rising prices so that the “laborer . . . may live comfortably,” Care must be taken, “that poor men especially, may not bee . . . clapt up in prison . . . because hee is not able to put in Bail.”

Peters also wanted to exclude poor artisans from taxation, and he proposed that there be peacemakers appointed to settle disputes before anyone could be arrested or imprisoned.

Robinson said the chaplain’s’ “political views were so advanced as to embarrass us in the inconceivably wealthy and comparatively stable twenty-first century.”
#15243176
You mean the wayward postulants of the disconnection? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Postulant Yes I've heard of this. The shy man, shining city on a hill.. Purify-england while-pilgriming liberty-justice prelacy-presbyterians humbug-holiday. The secret keepers, they guard the P's, the secret holders of the all the letter P's... No one gets in and out without returning the P words...
#15243177
Robert Urbanek wrote:The Puritans of colonial America have a reputation for being finger-wagging prudes, conducting witch hunts and being the template for The Handmaid's Tale.

Yet, “The word ‘puritan’ smothers what might otherwise be a natural interest in colonial New England as the most progressive society in the world at the time,” notes Marilynne Robinson in her article “One Manner of Law” in the August 2022 issue of Harper’s Magazine.

The Massachusetts Body of Liberties, drafted in 1641, “substantially anticipated the Bill of Rights.” Provisions of the Body of Liberties included the phrase “Every person within this Jurisdiction whether inhabitant or foreigner shall enjoy the same justice and law”.

A notable Puritan of the time, chaplain Hugh Peters, argued that the state should “have a stock readie” to protect the poor from rising prices so that the “laborer . . . may live comfortably,” Care must be taken, “that poor men especially, may not bee . . . clapt up in prison . . . because hee is not able to put in Bail.”

Peters also wanted to exclude poor artisans from taxation, and he proposed that there be peacemakers appointed to settle disputes before anyone could be arrested or imprisoned.

Robinson said the chaplain’s’ “political views were so advanced as to embarrass us in the inconceivably wealthy and comparatively stable twenty-first century.”


Well there is Words and there is Actions. What were they actaully like.

"all men were created equal" was written by slaveholders.
#15243212
George Washington (February 22, 1732[b] – December 14, 1799) was an American military officer, statesman, and Founding Father who served as the first president of the United States from 1789 to 1797. Appointed by the Continental Congress as commander of the Continental Army, Washington led the Patriot forces to victory in the American Revolutionary War and served as the president of the Constitutional Convention of 1787
The Washington family was a wealthy Virginia planter family that had made its fortune through land speculation and the cultivation of tobacco.
John Adams (October 30, 1735[a] – July 4, 1826) was an American statesman, attorney, diplomat, writer, and Founding Father who served as the second president of the United States from 1797 to 1801.
Adams was born on the family farm in Braintree, Massachusetts.
Though raised in modest surroundings, Adams felt pressured to live up to his heritage. His family was descended from Puritans, whose strict religious doctrines had profoundly shaped New England's culture, laws, and traditions. By the time of John Adams's birth, Puritan tenets such as predestination had waned and many of their severe practices moderated, but Adams still "considered them bearers of freedom, a cause that still had a holy urgency".[9] Adams recalled that his parents "held every Species of Libertinage in ... Contempt and horror", and detailed "pictures of disgrace, or baseness and of Ruin" resulting from any debauchery.[5] Adams later noted that "As a child I enjoyed perhaps the greatest of blessings that can be bestowed upon men – that of a mother who was anxious and capable to form the characters of her children."[10]

He decided to become a lawyer to further those ends, writing his father that he found among lawyers "noble and gallant achievements" but, among the clergy, the "pretended sanctity of some absolute dunces". His aspirations conflicted with his Puritanism, though, prompting reservations about his self-described "trumpery" and failure to share the "happiness of [his] fellow men". Adams at one point said that Christianity had originally been revelatory, but was being misinterpreted in the service of superstition, fraud, and unscrupulous power.

After arriving in London from Paris, Adams had his first audience with King George III on June 1, which he meticulously recorded in a letter to Foreign Minister Jay the next day. The pair's exchange was respectful; Adams promised to do all that he could to restore friendship and cordiality "between People who, tho Seperated [sic] by an Ocean and under different Governments have the Same Language, a Similar Religion and kindred Blood," and the King agreed to "receive with Pleasure, the Assurances of the friendly Dispositions of the United States." The King added that although "he had been the last to consent" to American independence, he wanted Adams to know that he had always done what he thought was right. Towards its end, he startled Adams by commenting that "There is an Opinion, among Some People, that you are not the most attached of all Your Countrymen, to the manners of France." Adams replied, "That Opinion sir, is not mistaken, I must avow to your Majesty, I have no Attachments but to my own Country." To this King George responded, "An honest Man will never have any other."[135]

Thomas Jefferson (April 13, 1743[a] – July 4, 1826) was an American statesman, diplomat, lawyer, architect, philosopher, and Founding Father who served as the third president of the United States from 1801 to 1809.

Thomas Jefferson (April 13, 1743[a] – July 4, 1826) was an American statesman, diplomat, lawyer, architect, philosopher, and Founding Father who served as the third president of the United States from 1801 to 1809.He was previously the second vice president under John Adams and the first United States secretary of state under George Washington. The principal author of the Declaration of Independence, Jefferson was a proponent of democracy, republicanism, and individual rights, motivating American colonists to break from the Kingdom of Great Britain and form a new nation. He produced formative documents and decisions at state, national, and international levels.

He believed in a creator god, an afterlife, and the sum of religion as loving God and neighbors.Jefferson's unorthodox religious beliefs became an important issue in the 1800 presidential election.[359] Federalists attacked him as an atheist. As president, Jefferson countered the accusations by praising religion in his inaugural address and attending services at the Capitol.declared that men "shall be free to profess ... their opinions in matters of religion." Jefferson abandoned orthodox Christianity after his review of New Testament teachings.[338][339] Jefferson has sometimes been portrayed as a follower of the liberal religious strand of Deism that values reason over revelation.

Although baptized as an Anglican and educated by Presbyterian clergymen,[233] young Madison was an avid reader of English deist tracts.[234] As an adult, James
Madison paid little attention to religious matters. served as the fourth president of the United States from 1809 to 1817.
James Monroe, nothing. John Quincy Adams, nothing. Andrew Jackson ...

Encouraged by the American government, large numbers of American settlers, many of whom held slaves, entered Texas. Tensions over religion, political instability south of Texas, economic issues, slavery, and efforts by the Mexican government to limit further immigration mounted, and in 1835, the Texas Revolution began when these settlers revolted.[246][247] By May 1836, they had routed the Mexican military, establishing an independent Republic of Texas. The new Texas government legalized slavery and demanded recognition from President Jackson and annexation into the United States. Jackson was hesitant in recognizing Texas, unconvinced that the new republic could maintain independence from Mexico, and not wanting to make Texas an anti-slavery issue during the 1836 election. The strategy worked; the Democratic Party and national loyalties were held intact, and Van Buren was elected president. Jackson formally recognized the Republic of Texas, nominating Alcée Louis la Branche as chargé d'affaires on the last full day of his presidency, March 3, 1837.

Andrew Jackson was born on March 15, 1767, in the Waxhaws region of the Carolinas. His parents were Scots-Irish colonists Andrew Jackson and his wife Elizabeth Hutchinson, Presbyterians who had emigrated from Ulster, Ireland, two years earlier.[5][6] Jackson's father was born in Carrickfergus, County Antrim, North Ireland around 1738.[7] Jackson's parental ancestors crossed into Northern Ireland from Scotland after the Battle of the Boyne in 1690.[8]

When they migrated to North America in 1765, Jackson's parents brought two children with them from Ireland, Hugh (born 1763) and Robert (born 1764).[9] The family probably landed in Philadelphia.
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