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#15008201
An interesting thing I have learned in my TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol) class is where the internet came from and why it was originally invented. It started under the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) of the US Department of Defense. The funding provided was to create a long-haul long distance network that could withstand a devastating and overwhelming first strike from the Soviet Union upon the United States. The choices when it came to such a long haul network came down to a circuit switched network or a packet switched network. It was determined that a packet switched network was more reliable and could meet the goal of with-standing an overwhelming first strike nuclear attack from the Soviet Union.

In a circuit switched network anything destroyed between two network nodes (communicating computers for example when I say nodes) would make it impossible for those two nodes to communicate. However, with a packet switched network, even if things were destroyed between two communicating nodes, packets in a packet switching network can be re-routed if necessary and still enable those two nodes to communicate with each other with no problems despite any destruction between the two communicating nodes. This was important for US nuclear defense strategy which relied on Mutually Assured Destruction of the Soviet Union in the event that the Soviet Union launched a surprise and overwhelming first strike nuclear attack upon the United States.

The theory of mutually assured destruction relied upon the notion that if one power launched a first strike upon another power, then the power that was hit by the first strike will still be able to retaliate with an overwhelming retaliatory nuclear strike of it's own upon the the power that launched the first strike inflicting overwhelming and unacceptable losses and damage upon the power that would hypothetically be the aggressor. The problem, however, was if the Soviets launched a first strike, their was a potential that they could knock out command and control abilities that would prevent the US from launching a successful and overwhelming retaliatory response in return due to the ability to communicate being destroyed.

That's when the internet came in and it's design goals was to be able to withstand an overwhelming nuclear first strike from the Soviet Union. This why a packet switching network was part of it's design. This solved that problem and guaranteed, that if the Soviets launched an overwhelming first strike upon the US, the US would still be able to communicate with it's nuclear forces despite any destruction and launch an overwhelming retaliatory response that would inflict unacceptable damage and destruction upon the Soviet Union in return. Thus, it more likely assured the doctrine of deterrence and discouraged the Soviets from considering a first strike nuclear attack upon the United States as a military option. And that's the origins of the internet.

TCP/IP was part of that. TCP (Transmission Control Protocol) assures reliable delivery of packet switched network packets for communication purposes while IP (Internet Protocol) determined the routing of these network packets to various important areas that would need to be communicated with to mount a response to any Soviet nuclear strike. TCP/IP given that it was publicly funded by the American taxpayer falls into the public domain. So, it's not a privately owned suite of protocols despite the fact it under the purview of specific standards-making bodies. Both everybody and nobody owns TCP/IP. Currently today, the US government has very little to do with TCP/IP.

References-

Pyles, J., Carrell, J. L., & Tittel, E. (2016). Introducing TCP/IP. In Guide to TCP/IP: IPv6 and IPv4 (5th ed., pp. 1-5). Boston, MA: Cengage Learning.
#15008209
So much of the modern world was built on military technology, but most people don't realize it. The interesting thing about IP and DNS is that they were not built to be secure in an open environment. Hence, IPsec and DNSsec. Early tunneling wasn't either. FTP->FTPs; HTTP->HTTPs; Telnet->ssh; etc.

George Friedman did a very good talk on military technology that's in the internet and smart phones:



I do a lot of work on software used by the US military and national labs. Army, Navy, Air Force, NSA, CIA, DoJ, Oak Ridge, LLNL, Sandia, CERN, etc.
#15008218
blackjack21 wrote:So much of the modern world was built on military technology, but most people don't realize it. The interesting thing about IP and DNS is that they were not built to be secure in an open environment. Hence, IPsec and DNSsec. Early tunneling wasn't either. FTP->FTPs; HTTP->HTTPs; Telnet->ssh; etc.

George Friedman did a very good talk on military technology that's in the internet and smart phones:



I do a lot of work on software used by the US military and national labs. Army, Navy, Air Force, NSA, CIA, DoJ, Oak Ridge, LLNL, Sandia, CERN, etc.


George Friedman is pretty good as usually. Along with Stephen Kotkin and Peter Zeihan i enjoy their talks both live and on youtube. Although Zeihan i would rate as the Trump of this kind of geopolitical talks and some of his analysis is a bit crazy although he is right on many things. Vladimir Pozner is also pretty interesting but a lot of his things are in Russian.
#15008220
@blackjack21

I like in your video how the guy giving the talk said that the real geniuses weren't Bill Gates or Steve Jobs. The real geniuses made $50,000 dollars a year and retired poor. That's true! The guys who invented the internet were working as civil service employees of the federal government. A lot of the technology and products we enjoy today came from preparing to wage war. Crazy man! You would think we would perhaps provide more funding to NASA. The American taxpayer gets a great return on investment, perhaps a much better return on investment funding NASA. I think it was said like something for every dollar spent on NASA the American taxpayer gets something like 15 or 16 dollars in return. Don't quote me on that one now. I am not sure if that figure is exact or accurate. I would have to research it.
By Rich
#15008224
blackjack21 wrote:So much of the modern world was built on military technology, but most people don't realize it.

Yes this is another reason why the whole moon landing project was utterly wicked. The billions frivolously wasted on this giant vanity project should have been put into the military. Some could have been put into technology and equipment, the bulk should have been put into building a large professional military. The amazing thing is that so many Libertards think JFK was a man of great vision, rather than a cynical con man who didn't give a fig about space, but launched the whole futile exercise as a diversion for his catastrophic lack of leadership at the Bay of Pigs.
#15008232
Rich wrote:Yes this is another reason why the whole moon landing project was utterly wicked. The billions frivolously wasted on this giant vanity project should have been put into the military. Some could have been put into technology and equipment, the bulk should have been put into building a large professional military. The amazing thing is that so many Libertards think JFK was a man of great vision, rather than a cynical con man who didn't give a fig about space, but launched the whole futile exercise as a diversion for his catastrophic lack of leadership at the Bay of Pigs.


You are missing the point. Space race was part of the Cold war. NASA developed military technology. The same rockets and sattelites are military technology.
#15008234
I thought everyone knew the ARPA net origins of the internet.

Anyway, most people don't realize that government is a HUGE innovator of technology. The government tends to be an early innovator in technology before business join in. It's because the government is willing to take on a large risk to develop something that private business isn't willing too.


Examples:
Internet
GPS
Fracking
Driverless cars
Nuclear power
Last edited by Rancid on 29 May 2019 20:02, edited 2 times in total.
By Rich
#15008240
JohnRawls wrote:You are missing the point. Space race was part of the Cold war. NASA developed military technology. The same rockets and sattelites are military technology.

Sending Moon into Space and even worse the moon was not fighting the Cold War, it was a diversion from loosing the Cold War. America had disastrous leadership from Roosevelt's demented demand for unconditional surrender until Nixon, America's greatest president since Lincoln, took office. At the beginning of 1943 the United States was in an immensely powerful and favourable position, how it got to where it was at the beginning of 1969 almost beggar belief.
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By Rancid
#15008244
Politics_Observer wrote: in my TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol) class


What degree are you studying? I do a lot of networking at my job. Mostly Software Defined Networking.
#15008246
Rich wrote:Sending Moon into Space and even worse the moon was not fighting the Cold War, it was a diversion from loosing the Cold War. America had disastrous leadership from Roosevelt's demented demand for unconditional surrender until Nixon, America's greatest president since Lincoln, took office. At the beginning of 1943 the United States was in an immensely powerful and favourable position, how it got to where it was at the beginning of 1969 almost beggar belief.


NASA developed drone technology, satellites and rocket technology. Rockets are used to carry ICBMs and the same processor mentioned by Friedman is involved. Satellites are self explanatory. Drone technology is coming in to play right now. It was exactly how the Cold War was fought. If you think the Moon race or the Space race was a useless indevor then you are gravely mistaken. It advanced technology by leaps and bounds. Drones, satellites and rockets are only the obvious parts. The non-obvious parts are composite materials, computational machines, communication technology etc all of which are foundations of modern economies right now.
#15008267
Politics_Observer wrote:I like in your video how the guy giving the talk said that the real geniuses weren't Bill Gates or Steve Jobs. The real geniuses made $50,000 dollars a year and retired poor. That's true!

It is, at least relatively. I was sort of amazed when John Backus died, that it was just a news footnote. When Steve Jobs died, the media went gaga. There are still a lot of people who had a huge impact on our modern world still around. If you are studying, it would do you good to avail yourself of Brian Kernighan on YouTube. I tend to be a regular grep user, and you can get insights from these types of geniuses.















Rich wrote:The billions frivolously wasted on this giant vanity project should have been put into the military.

A lot of NASA's work was really about military. All of the early astronauts were military guys. Captured Nazi scientists like Wernher von Braun were military guys. A lot of the space applications were military. Satellite communications for example. GPS was also a military application that was a military project but deployed by NASA.
#15008346
@Rancid

Rancid wrote:What degree are you studying? I do a lot of networking at my job. Mostly Software Defined Networking.


I am currently going after several certificates in Linux Administration Security and Support, System Administration, Web Design, PHP Programming, Web Programming, Cyber-security, Java and C++ through the college I am attending online (taking online classes). These are to "freshen up my skills" and demonstrate to employers that my skills are "up to date." I already have a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science but I have been out of my field for a while. Once I get these certificates, I will go after a Master's degree in Information Operations Security which is more in depth than Cyber-Security. One class I will be taking fall semester as part of my Cyber-Security certificate is "Ethical Hacking." That should be an interesting class.

TCP/IP is a tough course I am taking right now. In addition to that course I am taking Bash shell scripting, so I have been writing a lot of Bash shell scripts these past several weeks. TCP/IP is a tough class but well worth it. You LEARN TONS my friend. We were required to be proficient with base 2 binary and base 16 hexadecimal from a prerequisite course that we had to pass before we were permitted to take TCP/IP, which is very important given we are doing a very in depth study of both IPv4 and IPv6. I have taken a "Foundations to Cyber-security" class already which is a basic course in cyber-security. The Veterans Administration is paying for all these courses through veterans benefits I earned while serving during war time.
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By Rancid
#15008351
Politics_Observer wrote:I am taking Bash shell scripting

I do a lot of BASH at my job. I'm currently porting some BASH scripts into Python though. BASH can get unwieldy once you start doing more complicate stuff. Plus, doing shit like find and replace is fucking annoying with sed or awk. Lots of "///\\/\/\/\//\/\/\////\\//" kinds of stupid shit in the script. :lol:

Politics_Observer wrote:You LEARN TONS my friend.

I'm very sure you are learning a lot. I self taught my networking knowledge on the job. I'm mostly focusing on overlay networking, tunneling protocols, and software switches.

Politics_Observer wrote: The Veterans Administration is paying for all these courses through veterans benefits I earned while serving during war time.


Which country do you reside in?
#15008363
@Rancid

Rancid wrote:I do a lot of BASH at my job. I'm currently porting some BASH scripts into Python though. BASH can get unwieldy once you start doing more complicate stuff. Plus, doing shit like find and replace is fucking annoying with sed or awk. Lots of "///\\/\/\/\//\/\/\////\\//" kinds of stupid shit in the script. :lol:


You have a lot of regular expressions in Python too. I really like Python. Python is a very easy language to learn and it's fun to program in. I have actually written several scripts that I use in my Bash shell with Python. One of the pre-requisite classes I took required that we learn and program extensively in Python which I really enjoyed. So much so that I bought several books on Python from the book store and authored a few of my own scripts. I haven't used Python to do any web programming though you can from what I understand using Django. I have primarily used it as a scripting language in the Bash shell. One script I authored encrypts my passwords to various different websites into a file using the Viginere cipher. I wrote the code in such a way so that it was not susceptible to brute force hack or dictionary hacks. So, it's a good strong cipher. That being said, it's still susceptible to frequency analysis.

In addition to learning in depth of how TCP/IP works, we are also learning some of the various attacks that can be used in TCP/IP such as ARP poisoning, how MAC address spoofing, using ICMP to map another network, probe networks using ICMP, ping floods, smurf attacks, ping sweeps to determine live hosts (which could also forewarn a network of an impending attack too though), redirects, sending oversized ICMP packets or fragmented packets to cause a host to freeze and crash, ICMP tunneling, OS fingerprinting. So, ICMP is a great protocol to use with TCP/IP but it also carries with it security risks that you have mitigate. I personally would disable all aspects of ICMP protocol with the exception of allowing echo pings, traceroute and path MTU. Plus have a good IDS (Intrusion Detection System) installed like Snort for example to prevent outside actors from using ICMP in a malicious manner.

One thing that can be particularly nasty that we are learning about is when a malacious actor rigs up a rogue DHCP server. Rogue DCHP servers are bad news man and can wreck all kinds of damage on a network. We are learning how to mitigate and defend against Rogue DHCP servers. However, in most cases, Rogue DHCP servers are installed accidentally by a regular user who had no harmful intent. But if a Rogue DHCP server is installed through malicious act using malware, man you better watch out because that is going to do some serious damage to a network.

Rancid wrote:Which country do you reside in?


I reside in the United States.
#15008365
Image

The project was funded the Department of Defense but it was technology departments at research institutions like MIT, Harvard, and UCLA, along with Xerox and NASA’s Ames Research Center that actually invented the internet in the primitive form, connecting these various academic institutions. The predecessor of the internet, ARPANET, was just 45 computers connected to 40 nodes.

The ARPANET was not started to create a Command and Control System that would survive a nuclear attack, as many now claim. To build such a system was, clearly, a major military need, but it was not ARPA's mission to do this; in fact, we would have been severely criticized had we tried. Rather, the ARPANET came out of our frustration that there were only a limited number of large, powerful research computers in the country, and that many research investigators, who should have access to them, were geographically separated from them.
https://www.thoughtco.com/inventions-4133303
Last edited by ThirdTerm on 29 May 2019 21:41, edited 1 time in total.
#15008366
@ThirdTerm

ThirdTerm wrote:The project was funded the Department of Defense but it was technology departments at research institutions like MIT, Harvard, and UCLA, along with Xerox and NASA’s Ames Research Center that actually invented the internet in the primitive form, connecting these various academic institutions. The predecessor of the internet, ARPANET, was just 45 computers connected to 40 nodes."


That's true. We talked about MIT, Harvard and some of the other institutions. I think if I remember correctly a California university was part of it as well as Stanford, though don't quote me on it.
#15008367
Humans do not invent anything, they only discover and rearrange things.

The singularity occurred in the beginning.

Let's discuss the origins of electricity.

Now you see.

...

Human mind is extension of WHAT IS.

The internet is a natural feature of the Universe.

The natural/unnatural dichotomy is a human myth, believed by minds that feel separate from the Universe.

The dead language you're reading had to be read because you're living language experiencing itself as a mirror of infinite reflections.

This thread will help everything solve nothing because nothing solved everything before "I" had a chance to observe IT.

Rancid wrote:Internet
GPS
Fracking
Driverless cars
Nuclear power

Internet: Pieces of Earth transmuted by mind. Mind: piece of human transmuted by Earth.

GPS: Pieces of Earth transmuted by mind. Mind: piece of human transmuted by Earth.

Fracking: Pieces of Earth transmuted by mind. Mind: piece of human transmuted by Earth.

Driverless cars: Pieces of Earth transmuted by mind. Mind: piece of human transmuted by Earth.

Nuclear power: Pieces of Earth transmuted by mind. Mind: piece of human transmuted by Earth.

And so on and so and so on...

Government: Minds pretending to be in control of other minds.
User avatar
By Ter
#15008465
blackjack21 wrote:George Friedman did a very good talk on military technology that's in the internet and smart phones:

I respect George Friedman and I am always interested to listen to what he has to say.
I was however not too impressed with this talk. He was all over the place and I am pretty sure he did not prepare adequately for this talk.
Having said that, his prediction for a global war in this century was ominous.

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