Key Rasmussen Polls - Page 60 - Politics Forum.org | PoFo

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By Doug64
#15053125
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-seven percent (37%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending November 25.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey shows Biden with 37% support among Likely Democratic Voters. In distant second is Warren with 15% of the vote, followed by Sanders at 14% and Buttigieg at 12%.

    27% of Likely U.S. Voters think the federal or state governments should ban speech by individuals that a majority of Americans believes to be offensive, including speech considered to be racist or sexist. Fifty percent (50%) oppose a ban on such speech, while 24% are undecided.

    Despite the past month’s highly publicized House impeachment hearings, the president earned a monthly job approval of 47% in November, up one point from October. Fifty-two percent (52%) disapproved of the president’s job performance last month, unchanged from October.

    The United States currently contributes nearly one-quarter of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization’s $2.5 billion annual budget, and just 35% of Likely U.S. Voters believe America should continue to give more money to NATO than any other member country. 49% disagree and say the United States should not give more money than any other member does. Sixteen percent (16%) are not sure.

    63% of Likely U.S. Voters consider it likely that climate change will be catastrophic for humans, plants and animals, with 43% who say it’s Very Likely. Thirty-four percent (34%) think such a catastrophe is unlikely, including 16% who feel it’s Not At All Likely. Forty-eight percent (48%) believe climate change is caused primarily by human activity. Thirty-eight percent (38%) disagree and say long-term planetary trends are largely to blame. Fourteen percent (14%) are not sure. This is consistent with regular surveying in recent years.

    14% of American Adults say that none of their holiday gift shopping this year will be done online, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey. That figure has been trending down from 37% when Rasmussen Reports first asked this question in 2012 to 18% a year ago at this time. Among the 82% who plan to do at least some of their holiday shopping online, 37% plan to do all or most of it that way, up from 33% last year.

    50% of Likely Democratic Voters still think their party’s presidential nominee in 2020 is likely to be a woman or person of color, with 16% who say it’s Very Likely. But that compares to 68% and 18% respectively in late January of this year. While only 22% of Democrats considered that unlikely at the beginning of the year, now twice as many (43%) feel that way.

    And for the President's job approval over the last week (only two days thanks to the holiday):

    • Strongly Approve: 36%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 42% (-3)
    • Total Approve: 49% (+4)
    • Total Disapprove: 50% (-4)

    And over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 35% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 48% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 51% (-1)
By Doug64
#15054125
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-nine percent (39%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending December 5.

    A plurality (46%) of Likely U.S. Voters believes the American president has about the right amount of power. Thirty-three percent (33%) say the president has too much power, while 13% feel he doesn’t have enough. These findings are virtually unchanged from February of last year. A high of 64% thought the president had about the right amount of power just after Trump was inaugurated in January 2017. Elections make a difference, though. Fifty percent (50%) of Democrats now think the presidency has too much power, but in January 2013 when Democrat Barack Obama was in the White House, only seven percent (7%) felt that way. Similarly, just 19% of Republicans say the president is too powerful now, but during Obama’s presidency, 54% believed that.

    51% of all Likely U.S. Voters say impeachment is important to their vote in the 2020 elections, with 36% who say it’s Very Important. By comparison, 85% say health care is important to their vote next year, including 45% who say it’s Very Important. Forty-one percent (41%) say they are more likely to vote for a member of Congress who votes to impeach Trump, while nearly as many (38%) are less likely to vote for that incumbent. Only 18% say an impeachment vote will have no impact on how they vote.

    13% of American Adults say they or an immediate member of their family bought a hybrid car, one using both a traditional motor and an electric engine, in the past year. That’s up only slightly from nine percent (9%) over three-and-a-half years ago. Virtually unchanged from that April 2016 survey, however, are the 34% who say the next vehicle they buy is likely to be a hybrid, with only 11% who say it’s Very Likely. Fifty-seven percent (57%) consider a hybrid purchase unlikely, including 28% who say it’s Not At All Likely.

    49% of Likely U.S. Voters share a favorable opinion of the Democratic Party, including 23% with a Very Favorable one. Forty-eight percent (48%) view the party unfavorably, with Very Unfavorables of 34%. Similarly, 47% hold a favorable opinion of the Republican Party, while 50% view it unfavorably. Still, just 36% of voters think it would be good for the United States if there was a truly competitive third political party. That’s a new low for a finding that peaked at 58% in 2007 but had fallen to 49% 10 years later. Nineteen percent (19%) say it would be bad for the country if there was a competitive third party, while 30% say it would make no political difference. That compares to 17% and 21% respectively in August 2017. Fourteen percent (14%) are undecided.

    23% of Likely U.S. Voters view the recent mass shooting by a Saudi aviation student at the Naval Air Station in Pensacola, Florida that left four dead and eight wounded as a criminal act. Fifty-four percent (54%) describe it instead as a terrorist act. Twenty-three percent (23%) are not sure.

    Sixty-nine percent (69%) of American Adults think religious symbols like Christmas Nativity scenes, Hanukkah menorahs and Muslim crescents should be allowed on public land. Seventeen percent (17%) oppose such displays, but nearly as many (14%) are undecided. These findings, have held steady in surveying since 2008.

    Americans are feeling better than ever about the economy. The Rasmussen Reports Economic Index hit 144.3 in December, up one point from last month and just shy of the five-year peak reached early last year.

    And for the President's job approval over the last week (only two days thanks to the holiday):

    • Strongly Approve: 37% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 41% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 50% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 49% (-1)

    And over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 36% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 42% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 49% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 50% (-1)
By Doug64
#15054127
Rasmussen has decided that, with the importance of immigration for the upcoming election, they are starting up an Immigration Index based on ten questions that they'll be asking 2,500 Likely Voters over each week's five weekdays, reporting the index change on the following Tuesdays. Here are the ten questions, along with the initial results that set the base "100" score.

On the question of illegal immigration, is the government doing too much or too little to reduce illegal border crossings and visitor overstays? Or is the level of action about right?

  • Too much 32%
  • Too little 45%
  • About right 15%
  • Not sure 8%

In trying to control illegal immigration, should the government mandate that all employers use the federal electronic E-Verify system to help ensure that they hire only legal workers for U.S. jobs?

  • Yes 68%
  • No 19%
  • Not sure 13%

Do you strongly favor, somewhat favor, somewhat oppose or strongly oppose giving lifetime work permits to most of the approximately two million illegal residents who came to this country when they were minors?

  • Strongly favor 34%
  • Somewhat favor 24%
  • Somewhat oppose 17%
  • Strongly oppose 18%
  • Not sure 6%

Do you strongly favor, somewhat favor, somewhat oppose or strongly oppose giving lifetime work permits to most of the estimated 12 million illegal residents of all ages who currently reside in the United States?

  • Strongly favor 22%
  • Somewhat favor 23%
  • Somewhat oppose 18%
  • Strongly oppose 30%
  • Not sure 7%

Now, I'm going to ask you about authorized legal immigration: Recent federal policies have added about one million new permanent immigrants to the United States each year.Which is closest to the number of new immigrants the government should be adding each year -- fewer than 500,000, 750,000, one million, one and a half million, or more than one and a half million?

  • Fewer than 500,000 33%
  • 750,000 14%
  • One million 18%
  • One an a half million 8%
  • More than one and a half million 12%
  • Not sure 15%

Do you favor legal immigrants being allowed to bring with them only a spouse and minor children, or do you favor them also eventually bringing in other adult relatives in a process that can include extended family and their spouses' families?

  • You favor legal immigrants being allowed to bring with them only a spouse and minor children 60%
  • You favor also eventually bringing in other adult relatives that can include extended family and their spouses' families 30%
  • Not sure 11%

When businesses say they are having trouble finding Americans to take jobs in construction, manufacturing, hospitality and other service work, what is generally best for the country? Is it better for businesses to raise the pay and try harder to recruit non-working Americans even if it causes prices to rise, or is it better for the government to bring in new foreign workers to help keep business costs and prices down?

  • Better for businesses to raise the pay and try harder to recruit non-working Americans even if it causes prices to rise 60%
  • Better for the government to bring in new foreign workers to help keep business costs and prices down 24%
  • Not sure 17%

Should Congress increase the number of foreign workers taking higher-skill U.S. jobs or does the country already have enough talented people to train and recruit for most of those jobs?

  • Increase the number of foreign workers taking higher-skill U.S. jobs 28%
  • The country already has enough talented people to train and recruit for most of those jobs 58%
  • Not sure 14%

The Census Bureau projects that current immigration policies are responsible for most U.S. population growth and will add 75 million people over the next 40 years. In terms of the effect on the overall quality of life in the United States, do you favor continuing this level of immigration-driven population growth, slowing down immigration-driven population growth or having no immigration-driven population growth at all?

  • Continue immigration driven population growth at the current levels 33%
  • Slow down immigration driven population growth 43%
  • Have no immigration driven population growth at all 15%
  • Not sure 9%

Should immigration-driven population growth be reduced to limit the expansion of cities into U.S. wildlife habitats and farmland?

  • Yes 39%
  • No 29%
  • Not sure 32%
By Doug64
#15054128
Zionist Nationalist wrote:The US is split in two and it is likely going to stay like this permanently if politics will continue with the same direction

I wonder how bad its going to get before risk of another civil war

If Trump wins a second term I'd say the chances of that drop considerably, thanks to another four years of Originalist judicial appointments including at least one more Supreme Court pick (I can't see Ginsburg lasting another five years, and some of the older Originalist justices might take the opportunity to resign so they can be replaced by other Originalists).
By Doug64
#15055494
I hope everyone has a Merry (and safe) Christmas! Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-eight percent (38%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending December 12.

    52% of Likely U.S. Voters consider it likely that senior federal law enforcement officials broke the law in an effort to prevent Trump from winning the presidency. Thirty-nine percent (39%) say that’s unlikely. This includes 36% who say it’s Very Likely they broke the law to get Trump and 24% who say it’s Not At All Likely. These findings are virtually unchanged in surveying since February of last year. A plurality (43%) thinks these officials should be jailed if they are found guilty of breaking the law to prevent a Trump presidency, up dramatically from 15% early this year, while another 22% say they should just be fired. Fifteen percent (15%) favor a formal reprimand. Just 11% say no disciplinary action should be taken.

    The Rasmussen Reports Immigration Index for the week of December 8-12, 2019, is at 92.4, down from 100 the week before.

    Forty-six percent (46%) of Likely Voters say Trump’s Republican supporters are motivated more by party loyalty, but just as many (46%) say they mostly believe that it has not been proven that the president broke the law. Forty-three percent (43%) of voters say Trump’s Democratic opponents are mostly motivated by the belief that he did break the law. Slightly more (49%), however, think it’s more likely that they are driven by Trump’s surprise defeat of Clinton three years ago.

    48% of Likely U.S. Voters favor the impeachment of Trump by the U.S. House of Representatives. Nearly as many (46%) are opposed.

    68% of American Adults believe Christmas should be more about Jesus Christ than about Santa Claus. Just 16% put the emphasis on Santa, while 15% are undecided. This marks little change from annual surveys over the past four years. Support for Jesus fell to a low of 60% in 2014 from a high of 76% when Rasmussen Reports first asked this question in 2012. But unchanged for well over a decade is the finding that 67% of Americans prefer stores to show signs saying “Merry Christmas” over ones that say “Happy Holidays.” Twenty-two percent (22%) opt for “Happy Holidays” instead. Eleven percent (11%) are not sure.

    Michelle Obama edges Trump 48% to 45% among Likely U.S. Voters, with seven percent (7%) undecided. But that’s a closer race than a year ago when Rasmussen Reports first asked this question. At that time, it was Obama 50%, Trump 43%.

    51% of Likely U.S. Voters agree with Trump’s statement in a letter to the U.S. House of Representatives before the vote: “This impeachment represents an unprecedented and unconstitutional abuse of power by Democrat lawmakers unequaled in nearly two-and-a-half centuries of American legislative history.” Similarly, 48% agree with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi when she said, “Our democracy is what is at stake. … The president has engaged in abuse of power, undermining our national security and jeopardizing the integrity of our elections.”

    54% of American Adults say they will send Christmas cards this year. That matches the high from 2012, a finding that had fallen as low as 45% in 2017 but had rebounded slightly to 49% a year ago. Seventy-five percent (75%) will have a Christmas tree in their home this holiday season. This finding has ranged from 70% to 78% in surveys over the last several years.

    And for the President's job approval over the last week (only two days thanks to the holiday):

    • Strongly Approve: 38% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 41%
    • Total Approve: 49% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 49%

    And over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 37% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 42%
    • Total Approve: 48% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 50% (-1)
By Doug64
#15056331
I hope everyone had a wonderful Christmas! And I can unreservedly recommend Quartermaster General: Cold War for anyone that has at least two friends willing to commit an entire afternoon for a first game. (Though there's a two-player house rule posted at boardgamegeek.com that looks like it ought to work.)

Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-nine percent (39%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending December 19.

    The Rasmussen Reports Immigration Index for the week of December 15-19, 2019, is at 97, up from 92.4 the week before.

    23% of Likely U.S. Voters think most Americans understand how their government operates. Sixty-nine percent (69%) disagree and say most do not understand. That compares to 15% and 73% respectively just over a year ago when Rasmussen Reports first asked this question.

    As of last Monday, fifteen percent (15%) of American Adults said they have not started their holiday gift shopping yet. That’s comparable to last year at the same time but down from a recent high of 19% in 2017.

    55% of American Adults think Christmas is one of our nation’s most important holidays. Only seven percent (7%) see it as one of our least important, while 33% rate it somewhere in between.

    24% of all Likely U.S. Voters think the upcoming trial in the Senate will result in Trump’s removal from office, and that includes only 12% who say it’s Very Likely. Three-out-of-four voters (73%) say Trump is unlikely to be forced out of the presidency, with 47% who feel it’s Not At All Likely. Sixty percent (60%) of Democrats see Trump’s removal from office as unlikely, although that compares to 81% of Republicans and 78% of voters not affiliated with either major political party. Predictably, 69% of Democrats say the bigger problem for pro-impeachment senators is Republican party loyalty, while a nearly identical number (67%) of GOP voters think the bigger roadblock is a lack of convincing evidence against Trump. Unaffiliateds are evenly divided.

    Female Likely Voters by a 44% to 33% margin agree with this recent statement by former President Obama: “I’m absolutely confident that for two years if every nation on earth was run by women, you would see a significant improvement across the board on just about everything.” Just 21% of male voters share that view; 57% disagree. Roughly one-in-four voters in both groups are undecided.

    And for the President's job approval over the last week (only two days thanks to the holiday):

    • Strongly Approve: 36% (-2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 41%
    • Total Approve: 47% (-2)
    • Total Disapprove: 52% (+3)

    And over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 37%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 41% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 49% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 50%
By Hindsite
#15056412
Doug64 wrote:24% of all Likely U.S. Voters think the upcoming trial in the Senate will result in Trump’s removal from office, and that includes only 12% who say it’s Very Likely.

Those likely voters must have their heads up the behind of lying "shifty" Adam Schiff to believe that nonsense.
By Doug64
#15056420
Hindsite wrote:Those likely voters must have their heads up the behind of lying "shifty" Adam Schiff to believe that nonsense.

Hope is only useful when it is irrational.
By Doug64
#15057841
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-eight percent (38%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending December 26.

    The Rasmussen Reports Immigration Index for the week of December 23-28, 2019, is at 100.1, up from 97 the week before.

    72% of American Adults think 2020 will be at a minimum a good year. That’s up dramatically from 54% a year ago and includes 22% who say it will be an excellent year and 20% who predict it will be one of the best years ever. The previous high was 62% who had a positive outlook following the 2016 election as 2017 dawned. Only 47% felt that way about 2015, and optimism was even lower in the years prior to that. Just 15% think 2020 will only be a fair year, while six percent (6%) think it will be a poor one.

    65% of American Adults planned to be at home at midnight when 2020 arrived. Thirteen percent (13%) intended to be at a friend’s house, while four percent (4%) would welcome the new year from a restaurant or bar. Twelve percent (12%) thought they would be somewhere else.

    10% of American Adults consider New Year’s Day to be one of our nation’s most important holidays. Twenty-five percent (25%) regard it as one of the least important holidays, while 59% rate it somewhere in between. That’s in line with surveys for years.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds Biden with 30% support among Likely Democratic Voters, down from 37% in the previous survey conducted at the beginning of December. While Biden has led the Democratic contest all year, he has been unable to grow his support beyond the 39% he earned in January and May. Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren is a distant second now with 16% support, unchanged from a month ago. Battling for third place are South Bend, Ind. Mayor Pete Buttigieg (12%), Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders (11%) and Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar (10%). Support for Buttigieg is also unchanged from the previous survey, but Sanders continues to track down from a high of 19% among Democratic voters in October. Klobuchar is new to Rasmussen Reports’ surveying following California Senator Kamala Harris’ withdrawal from the presidential contest. Entrepreneur Andrew Yang earns six percent (6%) support among his fellow Democrats in the latest survey, up from two percent (2%) in September. Eight percent (8%) of Democrats like some other candidate in the race, and six percent (6%) remain undecided.

    33% of Likely U.S. Voters trust Trump’s judgment more than their own when it comes to economic issues affecting the nation. Fifty-seven percent (57%) trust themselves more.

    Despite his impeachment by House Democrats last month, the president earned a monthly job approval of 49% in December, up two points from November and just one point shy of his high for 2019 of 50% in April. In January of last year, Trump’s monthly job approval had fallen to 44%, its lowest level in a year. But it jumped five points to 49% in February following his well-received State of the Union speech, recapturing the high ground he held for most of 2018. Fifty percent (50%) still disapproved of the president’s job performance last month, but that was down two points from November.

    And for the President's job approval over the last week (only two days thanks to the holiday):

    • Strongly Approve: 37% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43% (+2)
    • Total Approve: 4*% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 51% (-1)

    And over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 37%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 41%
    • Total Approve: 49%
    • Total Disapprove: 50%
By Doug64
#15059037
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Forty-one percent (41%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending January 2, 2020.

    The Rasmussen Reports Immigration Index for the week of December 29, 2019 through January 4, 2020 is at 98.4, down from 100.1 the week before.

    70% of Likely U.S. Voters think the campaign lasts too long in a presidential election season. Just 17% disagree, while 13% are undecided. These findings are virtually unchanged from the last two presidential election cycles.

    43% of Likely U.S. Voters favor Trump’s order of a drone strike that killed the Iranian general. Just as many (43%) are opposed, with 14% who are undecided. A closer look reveals that while 72% of Republicans favor the president’s decision, 68% of Democrats oppose it. Among voters not affiliated with either major party, 40% favor; 36% oppose, but a sizable 24% are not sure.

    46% of Likely U.S. Voters believe the president will be reelected, marking little statistical change from the 44% who felt that way in March of last year and the 45% who predicted reelection this past November. Thirty-three percent (33%) think it’s more likely the Democratic nominee will defeat Trump, a finding that has ranged from 26% to 33% in previous surveys. But only 12% now feel it’s more likely that Trump will be impeached and removed from office before serving his first full term. That’s down from a high of 29% when Rasmussen Reports first asked this question in late December 2017 and marks a new low.

    39% of Likely U.S. Voters agree with Trump’s statement earlier this week: “… Iraq was the worst decision. Going into the Middle East was the worst decision ever made in the history of our country.” Nearly as many (37%) disagree, but 24% are undecided.

    21% of American Adults think Epstein actually committed suicide while in jail which is the official explanation for his death. Fifty-two percent (52%) say it’s more likely that he was murdered to prevent him from testifying against powerful people with whom he associated. Twenty-seven percent (27%) are undecided which is more likely.

    The economy continues to wow this month with the Rasmussen Reports Economic Index hitting 147.8 in January, up 3.5 points from last month and smashing through the five-year high.

    And for the President's job approval over the last week:

    • Strongly Approve: 35% (-2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43%
    • Total Approve: 48%
    • Total Disapprove: 51%

    And over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 37%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 42% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 48% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 50%
By Doug64
#15060288
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Forty percent (40%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending January 9, 2020.

    The Rasmussen Reports Immigration Index for the week of January 5-9, 2020 is at 99.7, up slightly from 98.4 the week before.

    When thinking about the major issues facing the country, 44% of Likely U.S. Voters say their views are closest to the average Democratic member of Congress. Just 13% identify most with the average Republican member of Congress, but 37% say their views are closest to GOP President Trump. This marks little change from a year ago. Among Republicans, 68% continue to say their views are closest to Trump’s, while 16% align themselves most with the average Republican in Congress. Eighty-one percent (81%) of Democrats identify most with the average Democratic member of Congress.

    45% of Likely U.S. Voters believe Trump should nominate someone to fill any Supreme Court position that opens up this year. Forty-nine percent (49%) disagree and say the position should be left open for the winner for the 2020 presidential election to fill. Looking closer, we find that 75% of Republicans think Trump should nominate someone if there is a vacancy on the high court this year, but 72% of Democrats believe the post should be left open for the winner of the upcoming election to fill. Voters not affiliated with either major party favor a delay until next year by a 49% to 41% margin.

    41% of Likely U.S. Voters believe the United States should be doing more to support the pro-democracy protesters in Iran. Twenty-five percent (25%) disagree, but a whopping 34% are not sure.

    39% of American Adults still favor a ban on plastic bags in their state, but that’s down from 44% two years ago. Thirty-six percent (36%) supported such a ban when we first asked about it in 2014. A plurality (48%) opposes a plastic bag ban in their home state, while 12% are undecided.

    44% of Likely U.S. Voters say they are more likely to vote for Trump in the 2020 presidential election. But 51% say they are more likely to vote against him. This compares to 42% and 52% respectively last September when Rasmussen Reports first asked this question. Eighty-four percent (84%) of Republicans, 16% of Democrats and 35% of voters not affiliated with either major party say they are more likely to vote for Trump. Eighty-one percent (81%) of Democrats, 11% of GOP voters and 58% of unaffiliateds are more likely to vote against the president.

    34% of Likely U.S. Voters favor a government plan like Senator Warren’s to cancel student debt for most borrowers. Fifty-four percent (54%) are opposed, while 12% are undecided.

    46% of Likely U.S. Voters now share a favorable view of Pelosi, while 49% regard her unfavorably. This includes 25% with a Very Favorable opinion of the San Francisco Democrat and 36% with a Very Unfavorable one. Only five percent (5%) have no opinion of her. In regular surveying since 2009, Pelosi’s favorables have generally run in the 30s, while her unfavorables have been in the 50s and 60s. But her overall favorables rose to 41% last January.

    Thirty-three percent (33%) now hold a favorable opinion of McConnell, including 18% with a Very Favorable one. This compares to 32% and 12% respectively a year ago, but McConnell’s faves were generally in the 20s for several years prior to that. Forty-nine percent (49%) view the Kentucky Republican unfavorably, with 35% who see him Very Unfavorably. But 17% don’t know enough about the longtime GOP leader to voice any kind of opinion.

    And for the President's job approval over the last week:

    • Strongly Approve: 38% (+3)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 42% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 49% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 49% (-2)

    And over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 37%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 42%
    • Total Approve: 48%
    • Total Disapprove: 50%
By Doug64
#15061652
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Forty-five percent (45%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending January 16, 2020. This week’s finding is up five points from a week ago, and is the highest finding since February 2017.

    The Rasmussen Reports Immigration Index for the week of January 12-16, 2020 is at 100.5, up from 99.7 the week before.

    26% of Likely U.S. Voters say Sanders’ views are closest to their own when thinking about the major issues facing the country. Twenty-four percent (24%) say their views are closest to the average Democratic member of Congress, while 41% are most in line with the average congressional Republican.

    40% of Likely U.S. Voters believe America’s trade relationship with China will be better a year from now than it is today. Twenty-eight percent (28%) expect that relationship to be worse in a year’s time. This compares to 42% and 34% of voters respectively in October 2018 just after the Trump administration imposed the tariffs on China. Twenty-two percent (22%) expect the U.S.-China trade relationship to remain about the same.

    35% of Likely U.S. Voters believe the Senate trial should be based only on the impeachment cases voted on by House Democrats in December. But 55% disagree and say the Senate should allow new witnesses to be called before reaching a verdict. Ten percent (10%) are undecided.

    32% of Likely U.S. Voters believe ongoing negotiations between the United States and the Afghani Taliban are likely to bring the 18-year war in Afghanistan to a satisfactory conclusion. That includes only eight percent (8%) who consider it Very Likely. Most (56%) say the current negotiations are unlikely to result in a satisfactory end to the war, with 23% who say they’re Not At All Likely to do so. Twelve percent (12%) are undecided.

    37% of Likely U.S. Voters say they like Sanders more than Clinton. Just 22% like Clinton more. Thirty-nine percent (39%) don’t care for either one of them. Among Democratic voters, 45% like Sanders more than Clinton. Thirty-seven percent (37%) prefer Clinton, while 17% say they don’t like either one.

    34% of American Adults rate race relations in America as good or excellent, matching the high that was previously released in 2014. That’s up from 25% a year ago and an all-time low of 18% in 2016, Barack Obama’s final year in the White House. Thirty-one percent (31%) still view race relations as poor, consistent with findings in recent years but up from a low of 15% in 2011.

    And for the President's job approval over the last week:

    • Strongly Approve: 36% (-2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 48% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 51% (+2)

    And over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 37%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 48%
    • Total Disapprove: 51% (+1)
User avatar
By Drlee
#15061653
Here is what is so infuriating in Rasmussen polls:

26% of Likely U.S. Voters say Sanders’ views are closest to their own when thinking about the major issues facing the country. Twenty-four percent (24%) say their views are closest to the average Democratic member of Congress, while 41% are most in line with the average congressional Republican.


What? :eh:
By Doug64
#15061820
Drlee wrote:What? :eh:

When you think about the major issues facing the country, whose views are closest to your own - those of Senator Bernie Sanders, those of the average Democrat member of Congress or those of the average Republican member of Congress?

  • Those of Bernie Sanders 26%
  • Those of the average Democrat member of Congress 24%
  • Those of the average Republican member of Congress 41%
  • Not sure 9%

Republican
  • Those of Bernie Sanders 10%
  • Those of the average Democrat member of Congress 11%
  • Those of the average Republican member of Congress 74%
  • Not sure 4%

Independents
  • Those of Bernie Sanders 20%
  • Those of the average Democrat member of Congress 20%
  • Those of the average Republican member of Congress 38%
  • Not sure 16%

Democrats
  • Those of Bernie Sanders 40%
  • Those of the average Democrat member of Congress 39%
  • Those of the average Republican member of Congress 13%
  • Not sure 7%
By Doug64
#15063365
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Forty-one percent (41%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending January 23, 2020.

    The Rasmussen Reports Immigration Index for the week of January 19-23, 2020 is at 102.7, up from 100.5 the week before.

    27% of Likely U.S. Voters believe Trump’s impeachment by House Democrats will hurt him in his bid for reelection. Slightly more (31%) say the impeachment will help him, while just as many (31%) feel it will have no impact. Eleven percent (11%) are not sure. Even among Democrats, only 40% think Trump’s reelection effort will be hurt by his impeachment. Just 16% of Republicans and 25% of voters not affiliated with either major party agree.

    72% of American Adults are confident that the U.S. public health system will be able to contain the coronavirus if it breaks out in the United States, although only 20% are Very Confident. Twenty-four percent (24%) are not very or Not At All Confident in the public health system.

    50% of Likely U.S. Voters now feel American elections are fair. Thirty-five percent (35%) say they are not fair to voters. This compares to 41% and 43% respectively early in 2016 before the last presidential election. Fifteen percent (15%) remain undecided.

    68% of Likely U.S. Voters believe a woman will be elected president of the United States in the next 25 years, although that’s down from 79% when we first asked this question in January 2013. Just 12% disagree, but a sizable 20% are undecided.

    52% of Likely U.S. Voters think it is better for the United States to tightly control who comes into the country. Thirty-six percent (36%) disagree and say it’s better for us to open our borders to anyone who wants to come here as long as they are not a terrorist or criminal. Twelve percent (12%) are not sure.

    38% of Likely Democratic Voters think Biden best represents the party and would make the best candidate against President Trump in November. Twenty percent (20%) say Sanders would make the best nominee. Fifteen percent (15%) see Elizabeth Warren as the best choice for the party. The remaining three candidates in the latest survey earn single-digit support among Democrats: Pete Buttigieg (7%), Amy Klobuchar (5%) and Andrew Yang (5%). Six percent (6%) of Democrats prefer some other candidate, and five percent (5%) remain undecided.

    52% of Likely U.S. Voters believe the president’s fate should be decided by voters in the next election. Just 44% think the Senate should remove him from office instead. Seventy-three percent (73%) of Democrats want the Senate to remove Trump from office as its impeachment trial comes to a close, but 26% think voters should make that call. Seventy-one percent (71%) of Republicans and 61% of voters not affiliated with either major party say Trump’s fate should be decided at the ballot box in November.

    And for the President's job approval over the last week:

    • Strongly Approve: 38% (+2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40% (-3)
    • Total Approve: 50% (+2)
    • Total Disapprove: 50% (-1)

    And over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 37%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 42% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 49% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 50% (-1)
By Doug64
#15065917
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Forty-two percent (42%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending January 30, 2020.

    The Rasmussen Reports Immigration Index for the week of January 26-30, 2020 is at 99.7, down from 102.7 the week before.

    56% of Likely U.S. Voters think the current primary process is a good way to select a party’s presidential candidate. That compares to 41% in 2012 and 38% in 2016. Only 19% now see it as a bad way to choose a party’s nominee. Twenty-five percent (25%) are not sure. Just 21%, however, believe it is good for the presidential selection process to always have the Iowa caucuses and the New Hampshire primary go first, up slightly from 18% eight years ago. Thirty-four percent (34%) consider it bad for the selection process to have voters in those two states go first. Forty-five percent (45%) are undecided.

    10% of Likely U.S. Voters say they have changed their opinion about Trump’s impeachment since the trial in the Senate began. Eighty-four percent (84%) have not. Seven percent (7%) of Democrats say they have changed their opinion about the impeachment, compared to 12% of both Republicans and voters not affiliated with either major political party.

    23% of Likely U.S. Voters identify health care as the most important issue to their vote in the upcoming elections. The economy is a close second with 21% who list it as their top voting concern. For 15%, taxes and spending are most important, while 13% are most concerned with illegal immigration. Next is climate change, the most important voting issue for 11%, followed by President Trump’s impeachment (6%) and national security (5%). Another five percent (5%) rate something else as most important.

    Forty-six percent (46%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the United States has become a stronger nation since Trump’s election, according to the latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey. Forty-one percent (41%) say he’s made the nation weaker, while 10% say the country is about the same. Fifty percent (50%) think America’s best days are in the future, down slightly from last April's all-time high of 54%, but still higher than it has been in regular surveying since 2006. Only 30% say the country’s best days are in the past. Twenty percent (20%) are undecided.

    The president earned a monthly job approval of 48% in January, down one point from December. In January of last year, Trump’s monthly job approval had fallen to 44%, its lowest level in a year. But it jumped five points to 49% in February following his well-received State of the Union speech, recapturing the high ground he held for most of 2018. Fifty-one percent (51%) disapproved of the president’s job performance last month, up one point from the month before.

    19% of Likely U.S. Voters say they rarely or never use social media like Facebook and Twitter. Sixty-one percent (61%) use social media every day or nearly every day. This marks little change from a year ago. Among regular users, 27% say their political opinions are influenced at least somewhat by postings on social media, up from 20% in late January 2019. But among voters under 40, the heaviest users of social media networks like Facebook and Twitter, 47% say their political opinions are influenced by postings on social media, up from 29% last year. By comparison, only 12% of middle-aged voters and 15% of seniors say their political opinions are influenced by social media.

    And for the President's job approval over the last week:

    • Strongly Approve: 36% (-2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 49% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 50%

    And over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 37%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 42%
    • Total Approve: 49%
    • Total Disapprove: 50%
By Doug64
#15067470
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Forty-two percent (42%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending February 6, 2020. This week’s finding is remains the same as a week ago.

    The Rasmussen Reports Immigration Index for the week of February 2-6, 2020 has jumped to 105.8 from 99.7 the week before.

    32% of Likely U.S. Voters think House Democrats should continue their efforts to remove Trump from office. Sixty-two percent (62%) say Democrats in Congress should now focus on other issues. For Democratic voters, it’s a close call: 48% say their representatives in the House should continue their efforts to remove Trump from the White House, but 43% say they should focus on other issues. Seventy-seven percent (77%) of Republicans and 70% of voters not affiliated with either major party say House Democrats should zero in on other issues.

    39% of Likely Republican Voters think Romney should be expelled from the Republican Party. Only slightly more (43%) disagree, while nearly one-in-five (18%) are undecided. Sixty-four percent (64%) of Republicans now have an unfavorable opinion of the man who was the GOP presidential nominee in 2012, with 38% who view him Very Unfavorably. That compares to 47% and 29% respectively last October. Thirty percent (30%) still share a favorable view of the Utah senator, down from 41% four months ago, including 17% with a Very Favorable one.

    61% of Likely U.S. Voters think there is too much federal government spending. Only 10% say there’s too little, while 20% believe the level of spending is about right. Forty-nine percent (49%) still feel that thoughtful spending cuts should be considered in every program of the federal government, but this finding has been trending down from a high of 63% in surveys since 2013. Thirty-four percent (34%) disagree. Seventeen percent (17%) are not sure. A plurality (44%) of voters who favor spending cuts thinks it’s better to cut domestic entitlement programs. Twenty percent (20%) would prefer to cut defense spending instead, while 29% believe cuts should be made in both areas.

    30% of Likely U.S. Voters believe all Americans should be required to vote and be subject to penalties if they do not. Sixty-two percent (62%) oppose mandatory voting. This compares to 25% and 65% respectively the first time we asked this question in March 2015. Democrats (47%) are much bigger fans of compulsory voting than Republicans (21%) and unaffiliated voters (18%) are.

    36% of Likely U.S. Voters favor the community they live in declaring itself a sanctuary for illegal immigrants. 49% are opposed to living in a sanctuary community, while 14% are undecided. These findings have changed very little in surveying over the last three years.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds Bloomberg with 26% support when Likely Democratic Voters are asked which candidate would best represent the party and make the best candidate against President Trump in November. Biden is a close second at 22%. Sanders is next with 18% of the Democratic vote. South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg has 12% support among his fellow Democrats, followed by Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar (7%) and Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren (6%). Two percent (2%) prefer some other candidate, while six percent (6%) remain undecided. But when asked which of the candidates is most likely to actually win the nomination, 24% of Democrats pick Biden, while another 24% say Sanders. Twenty-one percent (21%) think Bloomberg is most likely to be the nominee. Eleven percent (11%) predict Buttigieg, followed by Klobuchar (5%) and Warren (3%). Two percent (2%) like someone else for the nomination, while 12% are not sure. At the end of last month, Biden had 38% Democratic support nationally and a near two-to-one lead over second-place rival Sanders. Bloomberg was not included in that survey.

    After spiking to a five-year high in January, economic confidence fell back four points this month with the Rasmussen Reports Economic Index hitting 143.9. But it still remains in record high territory.

    And for the President's job approval over the last week:

    • Strongly Approve: 38% (+2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 50% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 49% (-1)

    And over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 37%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 41% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 49%
    • Total Disapprove: 50%
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