Socialist Planning - Page 4 - Politics Forum.org | PoFo

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As either the transitional stage to communism or legitimate socio-economic ends in its own right.
Forum rules: No one line posts please.
User avatar
By ckaihatsu
#14991362
SSDR wrote:
In my world, the socialist society would have a very strong industry. There would be a lot of factories, manufacturing centers, machine centers, and mining sites. Education would be very important to help advance technology. Science would be strongly supported. Research centers would be very common. And although the minimum work requirement is 30 hours a week, most occupations would work 50-60 hours a week.

The "state" is a production and wealth coordinator that coordinates what is to be done. Since humans are different, anarchy cannot work unless if every human was exactly the same because there would be dispute since different people want different things, so there must be a neutral state that can protect the desires of each person. The state is protected by the law enforcement, which is composed of the military, and the police. And a Socialist constitution would determine all of the rules, so that no one is above the law. Corruption and bribery would not exist.



In case you may be wondering why no one has bothered to reply to your inanity for *months* now, it's because it all boils down to *idealism*. You're regurgitating a political 'wish list', with your mere opinions on display, as though outlining your own utopia would be enough to *enable* the possibility of such a society.

But there's no such thing as 'a neutral state', because a state -- by definition -- has a *monopoly* on power, including violence, which is the *opposite* of 'neutrality'. This concentration of power *inevitably* produces corruption and bribery, because such social dynamics, favoritism and privilege, respectively, are effectively made into political *commodities* by the elitism of the state, which are then *purchased* by those with the means to do so.

Also, the populace would have to implicitly *tolerate* this kind of technocratic rule, otherwise it couldn't exist *at all*, even with its effective monopoly on power, no matter how many guns and weaponry it may have.

As I and others have told you repeatedly, you are *not* a socialist and what you describe does *not* resemble socialism in the least.
User avatar
By SSDR
#14991495
@ckaihatsu, I don't need anybody to reply to me. I can say whatever the fuck I want, and I don't need anything from anyone. :lol:

Your second paragraph we have talked about many times before. I keep telling you that a state that is socialist will be needed to prevent crime, but to you, crime doesn't exist because nothing, including the rape of your mom, is defined as crime. All crimes to you are social constructs you fucking moron.

If the populace was like you, then yeah it wouldn't tolerate it. You're basically saying that you can't tolerate it.

I don't need you to tell me what I am you fucking virgin. I am a socialist. And I don't need to prove it. I don't need anyone to tell me what I am, so you saying that is useless.

You're fucking useless in general. You never state your own opinions. You're manipulative because you know you have flaws. And your self drawn diagrams look like you have autism.
User avatar
By ckaihatsu
#14991638
SSDR wrote:
@ckaihatsu, I don't need anybody to reply to me. I can say whatever the fuck I want, and I don't need anything from anyone. :lol:

Your second paragraph we have talked about many times before. I keep telling you that a state that is socialist will be needed to prevent crime, but to you, crime doesn't exist because nothing, including the rape of your mom, is defined as crime. All crimes to you are social constructs you fucking moron.



Stop with the insults and bullshit -- it's not appropriate.

People, post-capitalism, are not just going to go off unhindered and do whatever they want in some kind of '70s social meltdown. Crime *is* very much a social construct in the sense that much of it, as defined by the bourgeoisie, is about crimes against *private property*, which itself *won't exist* after capitalism is overthrown, so then there can't be any crimes regarding property then.

Now if someone like *yourself* gets unhinged and goes around raping people then *that* can be handled in a collective way because everyone will be cooperatively *empowered* to handle such things. Transgressions against *persons* then will effectively be automatically *politicizing*, with a collective political response to be expected in return.


---


ckaihatsu wrote:
Also, the populace would have to implicitly *tolerate* this kind of technocratic rule, otherwise it couldn't exist *at all*, even with its effective monopoly on power, no matter how many guns and weaponry it may have.



SSDR wrote:
If the populace was like you, then yeah it wouldn't tolerate it. You're basically saying that you can't tolerate it.



No, you're doing that guesswork bullshit of yours again by shifting the scale from an entire society to just me.

Technocracy is not to be *admired*, much less *advocated* -- it's inherently right-wing and *elitist*, because it's only interested in that power hierarchy, and not in 'lifting all boats', as through public education, so that everyone's on-the-same-page in knowledge and abilities.


SSDR wrote:
I don't need you to tell me what I am you fucking virgin.



(Looking at watch) Nope, still not a virgin.


SSDR wrote:
I am a socialist. And I don't need to prove it. I don't need anyone to tell me what I am, so you saying that is useless.



Keep telling yourself that. You're showing yourself to be more and more erratic and unhinged with every post you make here.


SSDR wrote:
You're fucking useless in general. You never state your own opinions. You're manipulative because you know you have flaws. And your self drawn diagrams look like you have autism.



Whatever. Insults won't get you far around here because it's *not a fucking playground*. If you can't interact with others over political issues then just don't bother. It was pleasantly quiet around here for awhile when you weren't posting. Take a deep breath and stop making bullshit accusations.
User avatar
By SSDR
#14991645
@ckaihatsu, You're not appropriate. You're the one who needs to stop twisting words, and playing mind games. You're the one who needs to stop lol.

You twisting words won't get you anywhere.
User avatar
By ckaihatsu
#14991651
Whatever.

You're entitled to your opinions, of course, but they happen to have *nothing* to do with the topic of whatever thread you're posting them to.

This board isn't about interpersonal *psychology*, as you seem to think -- it's about *politics*, which is relatively *objective* (material causes), and doesn't depend on any one person's personal-type intentions.
User avatar
By SSDR
#14991653
@ckaihatsu, I am entitled to my own opinions, you don't need to say that lol. Your statements have *nothing* to do with the topic of whatever thread you're posting them to.

This board isn't about copying and pasting articles from other websites, it's about stating YOUR own political views.
User avatar
By ckaihatsu
#14991657
SSDR wrote:
@ckaihatsu, I am entitled to my own opinions, you don't need to say that lol. Your statements have *nothing* to do with the topic of whatever thread you're posting them to.

This board isn't about copying and pasting articles from other websites, it's about stating YOUR own political views.



Here, try *this* thread, before your posts on it:


NO, WEALTH ISN’T CREATED AT THE TOP. IT IS MERELY DEVOURED THERE. RENTIERISM IS SUCKING US DRY.

viewtopic.php?f=42&t=176052
User avatar
By ckaihatsu
#15059622
Also, just for the record, I thought up a good alternative description for what labor credits are, and how they function, in addition to the existing F.A.Q. at

http://tinyurl.com/labor-credits-faq

https://www.revleft.space/vb/threads/20 ... -Questions


Labor credits are basically *IOUs* for liberated labor only, that circulate, for liberated labor only. The scenario in the graphic illustration shows a situation of quick-need from a locality, necessitating quick provision of liberated labor, outside the norm of regular inventory stock control for regular quantities of communistic gift-economy production and egalitarian consumption of basic / standard goods and services.

The material dynamics at work here, as for anything, is described / depicted by this trade-off triangle diagram:

Image


So, in the scenario, it's like the locality (red hexagon) is issuing debt-based labor credits, or 'IOUs', in their name, thus taking a political 'hit' to their collective reputation, for the benefit of receiving immediate labor-efforts from willing-and-available liberated laborers from outside of their own environs.

If those of that locality can then soon go out and earn that same quantity of labor credits *back* to their locality, then the labor-credit 'IOUs' they issued would no longer be debt-based, and the damage to their locality's economic reputation would be fixed, while the labor credits they issued could continue to circulate freely in the wider world, without being debt-based any longer. The locality would *not* need to 'buy back' the labor credits / IOUs they previously issued, to close them out, as is typically done with IOUs.
User avatar
By ckaihatsu
#15061369
https://www.zdnet.com/article/artificia ... ly-chains/


Artificial intelligence works its way into supply chains

AI 'takes over the heavy lifting traditionally done by humans. It delivers deep analysis down to the SKU level, not practical with a manual approach.'

Joe McKendrick

By Joe McKendrick for Service Oriented | January 24, 2020 -- 04:09 GMT (20:09 PST) | Topic: Artificial Intelligence

Adding artificial intelligence to supply chains is delivering tangible benefits for companies putting it in place. Recent research out of McKinsey finds 61% of executives report decreased costs and 53% report increased revenues as a direct result of introducing artificial intelligence into their supply chains. More than one-third report a revenue bounce exceeding five percent. Areas generating revenue in supply chain management include sales and demand, forecasting, spend analytics, and logistics network optimization.

Image
Photo: Joe McKendrick


Sounds good. So what's standing in the way of getting more AI into supply chain management systems? I ran this question past Arnaud Morvan, senior engagement director at Aera Technology, a company that focuses on AI. "A reliance on obsolete legacy technologies creates a great deal of time-consuming and error-prone manual work for supply chain practitioners," Morvan points out. "They often spend about 50% of their time collecting and crunching numbers from disparate global systems. That adds weeks or months of delay to core processes that need to run faster to keep up with market demand."

Increasing complexity in supply chain IT infrastructure "makes it difficult to achieve the speed and agility that's required in today's markets," Morvan adds. "With globalization, it's common for large companies to operate hundreds of sourcing, production and distribution systems around the world, both internally and with partners."

Today's supply chains look a lot different than just a few years ago, and they continue to evolve in a fiercely competitive economy. The latest innovations include "the creation of pop-up warehouses, ship-from-store models and other speed-oriented innovations," he says. "And supply chains are challenged to effectively manage growing product portfolios that can include many thousands of SKUs. SKU volumes continue to rise as companies strive to meet customer expectations for multiple sizes, colors and other variations in product configurations."

AI can help keep enterprises on top of these shifts. Morvan calls the type of AI best suited for supply chain management as "cognitive automation," which is essentially extremely scalable AI that can "process terabytes or even petabytes of data." Such a platform can execute "thousands of Google-like data crawls a day across any number of internal or external systems, then aggregates and normalizes that data in what's called a cognitive data layer. There, AI and ML algorithms are applied to produce recommendations on optimal actions to improve supply chain speed and cost-efficiency," he states. "In effect, cognitive automation takes over the slow, difficult and unscalable data collection and analytic work traditionally done by human supply chain practitioners, often in Excel spreadsheets."


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An example of AI or cognitive automation in the supply chain would be a pharmaceutical and medical device company that uses the technology for "available-to-promise (ATP)" metrics. "ATP availability -- the ability to provide a delivery date to a customer -- can potentially rise from 50% to close to more than 90%." This is made possible through "end-to-end visibility of global demand and supply by collecting and processing data across multiple systems in real time." It can also serve to "predict lead times through machine learning required for accurate ATP dates and quantities, especially important for back orders." In addition, AI-enhanced supply chains can "monitor near real-time changes of supply and demand that could impact ATP dates and quantity," as well as "recommend prescriptive actions to prevent impacts on ATP dates and quantities."

Morvan provides four advantages to applying AI -- or cognitive automation -- for meeting today's supply chain challenges:


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End-to-end visibility. In today's complex networks of supply chains, "a cognitive automation platform addresses the challenge with constant data crawls across applications to create a single, virtualized data layer," he explains. "That layer reveals cause and effect, bottlenecks and opportunities for improvement. And it operates with near real-time data, rather than information that may be days, weeks or even months old."

Actionable analytic insights. :"Despite investing millions of dollars in data lake and business intelligence solutions, companies still don't have the insights required to make decisions in a timely manner to meet expectations for greater speed and agility," says Morvan. "Cognitive automation can sift through large amounts of information to discern patterns and quantify tradeoffs at a scale far beyond what's possible with conventional systems."

Reduce manual human work. "Supply chain professionals spend countless hours gathering data from disparate systems and utilizing BI tools or spreadsheets to devise plans. It's an increasingly difficult task," says Morvan. "There's simply too much data, too many applications and too many variables to account for. Cognitive automation takes over the heavy lifting traditionally done by humans. It delivers deep analysis down to the SKU level, not practical with a manual approach."

Informed decision-making. "Cognitive automation automates and augments decisions with AI-driven predictions and recommendations on optimal actions to improve supply chain performance," says Morvan. "It will spell out implications across various scenarios in terms of time, cost and revenue. A cognitive automation platform can also be authorized to act autonomously. And by learning over time, it continuously improves recommendations as conditions change."

RELATED TOPICS: BIG DATA ANALYTICS DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION CXO INTERNET OF THINGS INNOVATION ENTERPRISE SOFTWARE
Joe McKendrick
By Joe McKendrick for Service Oriented | January 24, 2020 -- 04:09 GMT (20:09 PST) | Topic: Artificial Intelligence

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By late
#15061371
There is something to be said for inefficiency.

There was a disease breakout in a small Canadian city some years back. Without a nearby warehouse, or an emergency supply like the ones hospitals used to have, they quickly ran out of a number of things they needed.

This forced them to start doing things like re-using needles.

Sure, you save a little money. But the poop will eventually hit the fan, and if it's something you genuinely need, you are up poop river without a paddle.
User avatar
By ckaihatsu
#15061389
late wrote:
There is something to be said for inefficiency.

There was a disease breakout in a small Canadian city some years back. Without a nearby warehouse, or an emergency supply like the ones hospitals used to have, they quickly ran out of a number of things they needed.

This forced them to start doing things like re-using needles.

Sure, you save a little money. But the poop will eventually hit the fan, and if it's something you genuinely need, you are up poop river without a paddle.



What's at-issue, I think, is what *metrics* are considered to be relevant for any given production, and who's *in control* of the overall societal production process, of course (meaning the proletariat vs. the bourgeoisie).

I'm not a technocrat, so I don't think that any AI, or specialist technocratic corps, can substitute for the collective decision-making of the workers themselves / ourselves over any given workplace or societal issue. (Such would be a professional administrative bureaucracy, would be a class-like schism in society, and would empirically have an elitist separatist interest, compared to those who did the actual productive labor for social consumption.)

I happened to have just posted a statement on this whole 'inefficiency' topic, at another thread:



Well, this happens to be a very 'modernist' (1950s, etc.) necessarily-linear, approach to the whole topic -- I'm a fan of complexity and *non*-linear dynamics, so I envision more of a landscape-of-piles-of-stuff that feed into each other, into various production processes, for finished products to the end consumers.

Because of our present-day digital data communications technology we no longer have any empirical need for formalistic political 'leader' types, to abstractly represent others' political will. We can now *all* potentially dive into the data itself and include ourselves in the mass-participation process over the same, to whatever degree, or not at all.



viewtopic.php?p=15061121#p15061121



Artificial intelligence can obviously use whatever metrics and testing / learning processes are given to it, so that could be *with* the metric / variable of exchange values ('prices', under capitalism), or *without* it, maybe even quantifying *use values* in some way that strives for mass-subjectivity / objectivity / standardization.
User avatar
By Raptor-Con
#15061572
Julian wrote:
- abolition of right of inheritance



Without getting too argumentative about this, how would this work? If you made loads of money during your lifetime, surely you'd want your kids to be able to live off that too?

If your main argument boils down to "Well, most millionaires and billionaires inherited their fortune from their parents and didn't actually build themselves up from nothing as they claim!" then coupled with a few examples of billionaires which this has happened to, then just type into Google "Amount of billionaires who inherited their fortune" (The amount is nothing compared to what some people argue).

And plus, where would this money go to? The government? And what would it do? Go to paying for some MP's moat cleaning service?!

I'm just curious to hear how this would happen nothing more, nothing less.

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