US Diplomat's Wife Hit and Run in UK - Page 8 - Politics Forum.org | PoFo

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#15044050
BigSteve wrote:The majority of the world recognizes right hand traffic (RHT).

You guys need to get with the program...


You need to try and understand roundabouts, as well.

Anyway, Mr Sacaloos was made a Diplomat retrospectively, which is why the American government are being asked to waive it.
#15044055
snapdragon wrote:You need to try and understand roundabouts, as well.


I have no problem at all with roundabouts.

Now, drivers in North Carolina are a different story...
#15044489
foxdemon wrote:Why does Antartica have RHT? :?:

Because if oil is found there, France and the USA have the rights to it, even if they have to kill every penguin currently living there to access it.

----

"I came, i drove, he died. Cackle-cackle."
( the feminist angle)


Every day, hundreds of American males get to kill innocent foreigners with violent machines. Why does this FEMALE get a different treatment.

We should be thanking her for her service.
#15045652
foxdemon wrote:Why does Antartica have RHT? :?:


I also find the claim unverifiable, unless the Antarctic Treaty or other similar documents had explicitly defined the traffic rules there. However, given most countries on the world use RHT, and a large proportion of roads or trails there are maintained by the US, this could be a statistically accurate description.
#15062150
Update! Update!

Press Association wrote:US refusal to extradite suspect a 'denial of justice' – PM

The refusal to grant an extradition request for the suspect charged in connection with the death of Harry Dunn is a “denial of justice”, the prime minister has said.

Boris Johnson’s comments were welcomed by the teenager’s mother, Charlotte Charles, who said they were “words that need action behind them” on Monday.

Johnson’s criticism of the US secretary of state’s decision to reject the request for the return of Anne Sacoolas to the UK, follows similar comments from the foreign secretary, Dominic Raab, and the home secretary, Priti Patel.

On Monday, Dunn’s parents met with Raab, describing the talks as “very honest” and “positive”.

Charles said she could see Raab’s “anger” with Mike Pompeo’s decision to reject the extradition request for Sacoolas.

Speaking outside the Foreign Office after the meeting, the family spokesman Radd Seiger said: “We wanted to look at the foreign secretary’s eyes and make it absolutely clear we were not going to accept Harry being swept under the carpet.

“The parents and I are absolutely clear that that is not the case and the foreign secretary is every bit as angry as the parents are, and frankly the whole nation now and they are not going to take this lying down.”

Dunn was killed when his motorbike crashed into a car outside a US military base in Northamptonshire on 27 August last year.

Sacoolas, the 42-year-old wife of a US intelligence official based at RAF Croughton, was granted diplomatic immunity after the crash, sparking an international controversy.

Pompeo rejected an extradition request by the UK government for Sacoolas on Thursday.

On Monday, the prime minister’s spokesman said: “We believe that this is a denial of justice and the individual concerned should return to the UK.”

Johnson also “reiterated the need” for Sacoolas to return to the UK during a phone call with Donald Trump on Friday.

Reacting to Johnson’s comments, Charles said the prime minister needed to put pressure on Trump and Pompeo to send the suspect back to the UK.

“The fact that he has come out and said that is obviously a good thing but we hope that he can follow this up with actions now. He needs to use his power, because he’s the only person with the power to tell Trump and Pompeo that she needs to come back. It feels good that he’s on the same page as us and this is certainly a step in the right direction,” she said.

Asked what her message to the prime minister would be, Charles added: “Make the country proud of you. There are a lot of people out there who don’t necessarily have faith in this government and this is a chance for him to restore a bit of that faith.

“It’s certainly another step forward but, until I see action, they are not empty words, but they are words that need action behind them to show us that they are 100% going to stand up for us.”

Addressing her views on the meeting with Raab, Charles said: “Dialogue was very open, everything was very honest, every question we had was answered. He was able to look us in the eye, we could see his anger with the decision of the States turning down the extradition request.

“We didn’t realise how large this would become or how much work it would take but we don’t regret a day of it.”

Charles and Dunn’s father, Tim Dunn, have disputed the Foreign Office’s claim that the suspect had diplomatic immunity at the time of the road crash.

Pompeo is due to meet Raab on Wednesday.

The Guardian



A very cruel thought: Maybe the British would use Julian Assange to exchange this suspect?
#15062224
There is a rapid souring of US/UK relations.

Johnson who is not smart enough to know that right now the UK needs all of the friends it can get keeps kicking sand in our (US) faces. His decision to allow a Chinese company to build the 5G network in the UK over strenuous US security objections is a bigly bad thing.

I think I will start a thread on it.
#15062477
Does diplomatic immunity extend to the family of a diplomat?

Seems like this shouldn't be as difficult as people are making it out to be. If immunity is extended to the family of a diplomat, then the United States cannot be compelled to extradite the wife of the diplomat to the UK.

Maybe I'm missing it, but where's the grey area in all of this?
#15062482
foxdemon wrote:Anyway, this whole incident could have been avoided if the Americans were forced to drive on the correct side of the road.

You mean if Britain drove on the correct side of the road. I'm a fanatical English language nationalist, but like all decent people I support Metric and RHD.
#15062954
Does diplomatic immunity extend to the family of a diplomat?


It does. Without this every accompanied diplomat would be to easy to blackmail.
#15063019
Indy wrote:
Seems like this shouldn't be as difficult as people are making it out to be.



It's worse.

This sort of thing will corrupt a relationship. If people can't count on you to do the decent thing, they will stop trusting you.

Oh wait, they already have.
#15063022
snapdragon wrote:You need to try and understand roundabouts, as well.


I'm guessing you've not been in the US for a while. Roundabouts are much more common here now. People know how to drive them.

This is as antiquated as saying American beer is bad. That statement stopped being true about 15-20 years ago.
#15063046
late wrote:It's worse.

This sort of thing will corrupt a relationship. If people can't count on you to do the decent thing, they will stop trusting you.

Oh wait, they already have.


I see how you got your backhanded swipe at Trump in there, but you're premise is simply wrong.

Legally, the hands of our government are tied. There's no real grey area with diplomatic immunity. The US government cannot force the woman to go back. That decision is hers and hers alone, and it makes no sense at all to try to lay the blame on our government.
#15063083
Indy wrote:
I see how you got your backhanded swipe at Trump in there, but you're premise is simply wrong.

Legally, the hands of our government are tied. There's no real grey area with diplomatic immunity. The US government cannot force the woman to go back. That decision is hers and hers alone, and it makes no sense at all to try to lay the blame on our government.



That lands us in an extremely complicated legal situation. I'll have to look into it.
#15063091
late wrote:That lands us in an extremely complicated legal situation. I'll have to look into it.


It works both ways, too.

If a diplomat from the UK accidentally killed someone here, the British government could not force that person to return to the states.

It's a pretty black and white issue, and it's not really a complicated legal situation at all. In fact, it's a pretty simple one.
#15063123
The problem really is that it is the UK. Notwithstanding the current government's deliberately dissing the US, if this were Saudi Arabia there would not be the questions. Clearly we would not return a diplomat to face torture and beheading.

Again. This is not hard. Diplomats must be protected from this stuff because it is too easy to trump up charges and use them as pawns. There families must be covered as well or they would not be able to bring them to overseas assignments. It is not possible to negotiate individual agreements just because some countries are naughty and some are nice.

I hate to say this but the UK just needs to let this go. What part of NO do you not understand. And while you are getting angry about my bluntness, please consider what the answer would have been if the UK was asked to turn over one of its diplomats. Same NO I am certain.
#15063125
Drlee wrote:The problem really is that it is the UK. Notwithstanding the current government's deliberately dissing the US, if this were Saudi Arabia there would not be the questions. Clearly we would not return a diplomat to face torture and beheading.

Again. This is not hard. Diplomats must be protected from this stuff because it is too easy to trump up charges and use them as pawns. There families must be covered as well or they would not be able to bring them to overseas assignments. It is not possible to negotiate individual agreements just because some countries are naughty and some are nice.

I hate to say this but the UK just needs to let this go. What part of NO do you not understand. And while you are getting angry about my bluntness, please consider what the answer would have been if the UK was asked to turn over one of its diplomats. Same NO I am certain.


Undoubtedly.

It's a tragic affair, and I don't think anyone would say it was anything but a horrific accident.
#15063128
Right at the moment, Johnson should not be screwing with any of the UKs trading partners. And he might be most especially careful with one run by President Trump, who is not a person to take these sorts of things lightly.

Why is this even a thing? It is so common that it happens somewhere in the world just about every week.

This is the most fundamental diplomatic boilerplate. This has nothing to do with the UKs honor nor that of the woman. After all of the publicity surrounding this she would be an idiot to return to the UK. No way to get a fair trial.

The UK is who is acting like a special snowflake here.
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