The American Civil War, day by day - Page 50 - Politics Forum.org | PoFo

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#15125677
@Potemkin, that sums it up nicely. :)
#15125941
October 9, Thursday

A little skirmishing on the Mackville Pike and Bardstown Road in Kentucky is an anticlimax to the fighting yesterday at Perryville. There is also action at Dry Ridge, Dog Walk or Chesser’s Store near Salt River, Kentucky, and an affair near Humbolt, Tennessee. A Federal expedition that lasts until November 25 moves from Fort Union to the Canadian River and Utah Creek, New Mexico Territory.

General Lee launches Jeb Stuart and 1,800 cavalrymen on a daring armed reconnaissance across the Potomac.

The Confederate Congress organizes military courts for the armies in the field and defines their powers.
#15126203
October 10, Friday

Since receiving President Lincoln’s telegram ordering him to advance, McClellan hasn’t budged. He remains behind the Potomac, insisting in an increasingly bitter telegraphic duel with Washington that his army cannot move without reinforcements and supplies. This long-range debate becomes so acrimonious that when McClellan asks for more horses because those in his cavalry are broken down and plagued by a variety of diseases, Lincoln explodes. “I have just read your dispatch about sore-tongued and fatigued horses,” the president wires caustically in reply. “Will you pardon me for asking what the horses of your army have done since the battle of Antietam that fatigues anything?”

McClellan’s demands stem in part from his chronic perfectionism. Nevertheless, some of his claims are valid. More than half of the horses of the V Corps artillery are unshod and a large number in all the batteries are lame with hoof rot. Many soldiers have been issued no now clothing since embarking on the Peninsular Campaign seven months ago, and there are “men with no coats, no underclothes, in rags, no shoes.” What McClellan fails to grasp, however, is that the Confederate army is in even worse shape. And every day he delays in pushing south enables Lee’s men to gain strength and numbers at their bivouacs near Winchester. By now, so many stragglers and recruits have joined the Army of Northern Virginia that Lee reports 64,273 present for duty. This is less than two thirds of McClellan’s total but nearly double the number that retreated from Sharpsburg three weeks ago.

There is fighting at Harrodsburg and Danville Cross Roads, Kentucky, as Bragg’s Confederates begin their retreat east and southward.

In Virginia Jeb Stuart crosses the Potomac on his raid, and by evening enters Chambersburg, Pennsylvania.

In Tennessee there is a skirmish at Medon Station; on the upper Missouri River below Fort Berthold, Dakota Territory, a party of Sioux fight with a boatload of miners. Indiana home guards drive a group of rebel guerrillas from Hawesville, Indiana.

President Davis asks Virginia for a draft of 4,500 Blacks to work on completion of the fortifications of Richmond.

Major General John B. Magruder, Confederate hero of the siege of Yorktown, is assigned to command the District of Texas.
#15126426
October 11, Saturday

Jeb Stuart at Chambersburg reports that all officials have fled on the approach of the Confederates. His men cut telegraph wires, seize horses, and destroy what military equipment they cannot bring away. Railroad machine shops, depots, and several trains are also wrecked. In the afternoon Stuart moves eastward and then south through Emmitsburg, Maryland, en route to the Potomac.

There is sharp skirmishing near Helena, Arkansas, and operations in Lewis, Clarke, Scotland, and Schuyler counties of Missouri. In Kentucky there is skirmishing at Lawrenceburg and Danville.

The Confederate cruiser Alabama captures and sinks the grain ship Manchester.

An act of the Confederate Congress, approved by President Davis, amends the draft exemption law, enlarging the number of those exempted by reason of occupation. Most controversial is the exemption of an owner or overseer of more than twenty slaves.

Richmond papers begin to speak of a possible early peace as a result of Confederate successes.
#15126633
October 12, Sunday

Stuart’s Confederate cavalry, after brief skirmishing near the mouth of the Monocacy in Maryland, crosses the Potomac back into Virginia near Poolesville, completing the second ride around McClellan since June. Federal cavalry have tried to halt this new ride around McClellan’s inert army, but to no avail. At great risk, and with only one man wounded, Stuart performs another sensational though not militarily vital foray against the North.

There is skirmishing near Arrow Rock, Missouri, and at Dick’s Ford, Kentucky.

Confederate Major General Earl Van Dorn assumes command of all troops in Mississippi.

President Lincoln, worried by Buell’s follow-up in Kentucky, continues to inquire for reports from the West.

A Federal expedition that will last until the nineteenth starts from Ozark, Missouri, toward Yellville, Arkansas.
#15126921
October 13, Monday

The second session of the First Congress of the Confederate States of America adjourns at Richmond after renewal of the law authorizing suspension of the privilege of the writ of habeas corpus until February 12, 1863. However, it is required that investigation be made of persons arrested.

President Lincoln writes McClellan a long letter of pointed advice. It is based on an elementary maxim of geometry. The enemy army, by nature of its position in the Shenandoah Valley west of the Blue Ridge, will have to take a roundabout route south and east through the mountain passes in order to defend the Confederate capital of Richmond. But McClellan can take what Lincoln calls the “inside track,” which lies east of the Blue Ridge, and march directly upon Richmond. Lee’s route, writes Lincoln, “is the arc of a circle, while yours is the chord.” McClellan can beat Lee to Richmond or intercept him en route—“unless you admit that he is more than your equal on a march.” While McClellan mulls over the advice, Lincoln decides to draw a limit on his own forbearance. Fearing that McClellan is “playing false—that he did not want to hurt the enemy,” Lincoln privately sets a test for his general. “I saw how he could intercept the enemy on the way to Richmond,” the President will later explain to his private secretary John Hay. “If he let them get away I would remove him.”

Federal troops carry out a reconnaissance with some action about Paris, Snickersville, and Middleburg, Virginia. Other fighting is at New Franklin, Missouri; Lancaster and on Crab Road, Kentucky; and on the Lebanon Road, near Nashville, Tennessee.

Major General Jacob D. Cox assumes command of the Federal District of West Virginia.

Bragg’s Confederates, pulling back from Perryville, Kentucky, take up the march for Cumberland Gap.
#15127253
October 14, Tuesday

Congressional elections in Iowa, Ohio, Indiana, and Pennsylvania results in gains by the Democrats, except in Iowa, where Republicans carry the state.

President Lincoln orders the removal of army bakeries from the basement of the Capitol building.

The Confederates have been making extraordinary efforts to improve their defenses in the Vicksburg area. President Jefferson Davis, whose own Brierfield plantation is just a short distance down the Mississippi from Vicksburg, considers the town to be nothing less than “the vital point” of the Confederacy. He has sent Lieutenant General John C. Pemberton, a man he much admires, to take charge of the Department of Mississippi and Eastern Louisiana, and today Pemberton assumes command.

There is fighting at Hazel Bottom, Missouri; Trenton, Arkansas; and continuing action in Kentucky at Manchester, Lancaster, and Crab Orchard Road.
#15127299
The Confederates have been making extraordinary efforts to improve their defenses in the Vicksburg area. President Jefferson Davis, whose own Brierfield plantation is just a short distance down the Mississippi from Vicksburg, considers the town to be nothing less than “the vital point” of the Confederacy.

Later events were to prove him correct in that assessment.
#15127317
Potemkin wrote:Later events were to prove him correct in that assessment.

Yup, but Grant had to learn patience first—not a lesson he enjoyed much. :eh:
#15127322
Doug64 wrote:Yup, but Grant had to learn patience first—not a lesson he enjoyed much. :eh:

Indeed not. :lol:
#15127328
Carpetbaggers and Capitalists won over the pro feudal style plantation owners. Who continued to scheme to take away rights from African Americans. For that alone the Southern Cause should be disrespected forever and ever and all their racist shit thoughts lost in history for all time.
#15127338
Tainari88 wrote:Carpetbaggers and Capitalists won over the pro feudal style plantation owners. Who continued to scheme to take away rights from African Americans. For that alone the Southern Cause should be disrespected forever and ever and all their racist shit thoughts lost in history for all time.


You might like this resource @Tainari88 , it has a lot of good links also to great Socialist and Abolitionist articles and speeches, and information on Slavers and Slavery in the old pre-Civil War South;

http://medicolegal.tripod.com/slaveryillegal.htm

I personally think you'll love it, let me know what you think.
#15127403
annatar1914 wrote:You might like this resource @Tainari88, it has a lot of good links also to great Socialist and Abolitionist articles and speeches, and information on Slavers and Slavery in the old pre-Civil War South;

http://medicolegal.tripod.com/slaveryillegal.htm

I personally think you'll love it, let me know what you think.


I started studying the American Civil War a long time ago. The Ken Burns series was a great series on PBS to watch too. The reality was that slavery was allowed due to the need for an elite to profit. Most American farmers never owned a single slave. That was for elitists who owned huge tracts of land and could use slave labor for profit. I actually visited a site filled with graves of overworked slave children who died from lack of medical care, cold, and hunger. They were treated like trash by the owners and the women were often forced to sell off their babies and children for paying off debts of slave owners. I have no respect for those people. In their historical time period, there were abolitionists, Amish religious folks, Mennonites, and immigrants who were not in agreement with their slavery oppression shit philosophies. But they refused to give up power. Some of the slaver people when they lost the war they went to Brazil and other nations seeking to continue slavery for their property. They weren't loyal to the USA they were loyal to being wealthy via slavery.

Puerto Rico abolished slavery on March 22, 1873. To this day that is a bank holiday and everything is closed on the island and there are celebrations and commemorative coins issued by the Institute for Puerto Rican culture celebrating freedom and the end of slavery in Puerto Rico. Does the USA celebrate the end of that horror? No, they don't. The Southern states can't accept their SHAME and INHUMANE oppressive behavior. Accept the blame and accept that it was about greed and inhumanity and getting free labor for centuries and lack of rights being given to millions of people who are more American than the vast majority of the immigrants from Europe who back then arrived on American shores between the 1880s till the early 1920s in large quantities wanting to be part of the American Experiment. The South needed to change and change profoundly and permanently. Admit the mistake, the oppression, and the horror. They might progress. If they don't? I hope they get their ass kicked forever and their racist shit thoughts are burning with shame and infamy for all time.

I have zero tolerance for slavery.
#15127503
October 15, Wednesday

Skirmishing continues on widely scattered fronts: Fort Gibson, Indian Territory; Neely’s Bend on the Cumberland River, Tennessee; Crab Orchard and Barren Mound, Kentucky; and near Carrsville, Virginia. There are operations from this day to the twentieth against Confederate guerrillas in Henry, Owen, and Gallatin counties, Kentucky.

Federal Admiral Farragut reports from Pensacola Bay that Galveston, Corpus Christi, and Sabine City, Texas, are in Union possession. A small-boat naval expedition cuts out and captures a Confederate blockade runner up the Apalachicola River in Florida, despite shore opposition.

Governor Zebulon Vance of North Carolina calls upon the people of the state to furnish blankets, carpets, and clothing for the Confederate Army.
#15127720
October 16, Thursday

General McClellan launches two major Federal reconnaissances from Harpers Ferry to Charles Town, western Virginia, with some skirmishing ensuing. Lee’s army remains in the northern portion of the Shenandoah Valley.

In Kentucky, Bragg moves slowly toward Cumberland Gap without major interference. The sting of his near removal may have propelled General Buell into battle at Perryville but, to the despair of President Lincoln, Buell has failed to press the issue after Perryville despite his considerable advantages. Given the chance to pursue Bragg’s outnumbered and retreating army out of Tennessee, Buell refuses. Today he informs Washington that he will not follow the Confederates because the roads are too rough and the country too barren. As he argued during the summer, Buell now insists that the preferable route into eastern Tennessee is from the south, not the north. He would reassemble the army in Nashville, return to northern Alabama, and attack Chattanooga from there.

There is skirmishing at Mountain Gap and Mount Vernon, Kentucky. In Missouri there is action at Auxvasse Creek in Callaway County and at Portland; in Arkansas at Shell’s Mill and Elkhorn Tavern.

The draft begins in Pennsylvania and other portions of the North.

The Federal department of the Tennessee is constituted under command of Major General Ulysses S. Grant.
#15127897
October 17, Friday

Resistance to the ineffective Federal militia draft is developing in some states, particularly several counties of Pennsylvania. At Berkley in Luzerne County troops have to put down opposition.

Skirmishing takes place at Lexington, Missouri; Mountain Home and Sugar Creek, Arkansas; Valley Woods and Rock Hill, Kentucky; and Island No. 10, Tennessee. There is an expedition on this day and the eighteenth by Federals through Thoroughfare Gap, Virginia.

President Lincoln asks Attorney General Bates to make out a commission for David Davis of Illinois as Associate Justice of the Supreme Court.
#15128066
October 18, Saturday

John Hunt Morgan and his Confederate raiders defeat Federal cavalry near Lexington, Kentucky, enter the city, capture the garrison, and move off toward Versailles.

There is other fighting this day at Kirk’s Bluff, South Carolina; Bloomfield, Big Hill, Little Rockcastle River, and Mountainside, Kentucky; Uniontown and California House, Missouri; and Cross Hollow and Helena, Arkansas.
#15128229
October 19, Sunday

Bragg’s retiring Army of Tennessee arrives in the area of Cumberland Gap, Kentucky, where they will take until the twenty-fourth to get through completely, taking with them large amounts of grain and supplies appropriated in Kentucky. Federal opposition will be light.

It is a quiet wartime Sunday, although there is the usual skirmishing, this time at Bardstown and Wild Cat, Kentucky; between Catlett’s Station and Warrenton Junction, Virginia; and at Bonnet Carré in St. John the Baptist Parish, Louisiana.
#15128442
October 20, Monday

President Lincoln orders Major General John A. McClernand, Illinois politician, to proceed to Indiana, Illinois, and Iowa to organize troops for an expedition against Vicksburg under McClernand’s command. This conflicts with General Grant’s new command and will result in many charges and countercharges and much friction between Grant and McClernand. Lincoln also pens memorandums, one showing the Army of the Potomac has a total of 231,997 men of which 144,662 are fit for duty, the other establishing a provisional court in Louisiana.

Fighting includes Federal repulse of a force under General Forrest on the Gallatin Pike near Nashville, Tennessee; and skirmishes near Helena, Arkansas; Marshville, Missouri; Hermitage Ford, Tennessee; Wild Cat, Kentucky; and Hedgesville, western Virginia.
#15128792
October 21, Tuesday

Confederate President Davis writes Major General T.H. Holmes in Missouri of tentative plans to have Southern armies join together to drive the Federals from Tennessee and Arkansas and recapture Helena, Memphis, and Nashville.

President Lincoln meanwhile calls upon military and civil authorities in Tennessee to support elections for a state government, legislature, and members of Congress.

There is a reconnaissance from Loudoun Heights to Lovettsville, Virginia, by Federals; a skirmish at Woodville, Tennessee; and another at Pitman’s Cross Roads, Kentucky.
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