thoughts on police and black men dying - Page 7 - Politics Forum.org | PoFo

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Crime and prevention thereof. Loopholes, grey areas and the letter of the law.
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#15167929
Pants-of-dog wrote:Yes, it is clear that you think you have understood. That does not change what I have said. The example you gave had nothing to do with preventing someone from filming the cop, which was the topic of conversation.


Indeed, it did not, yet it doesn't matter. The complaint filed in your scenario would be that the cell phone was illegally taken. I don't see why would cops not investigate it through.

Pants-of-dog wrote:It is indicative of how police view black drug addicts. And how they want the public to see black drug addicts.


It is indicative of how the defense is trying to get Derek Chauvin out.
#15167932
wat0n wrote:Indeed, it did not, yet it doesn't matter. The complaint filed in your scenario would be that the cell phone was illegally taken. I don't see why would cops not investigate it through.


:|

It is indicative of how the defense is trying to get Derek Chauvin out.


And that has implications for the broader subject of relations between police and black people.

In this case, we see a racist paradigm being perpetuated that criminalises drug addiction in blacks.
#15167934
Pants-of-dog wrote::|


Am I wrong about it or what? Why would cops do a coverup in your scenario but not do the same whenever one of their own steals a cell phone?

Pants-of-dog wrote:And that has implications for the broader subject of relations between police and black people.

In this case, we see a racist paradigm being perpetuated that criminalises drug addiction in blacks.


Why? I mean, several MPD members testified against Chauvin. What makes you believe this isn't just his defense lawyer's strategy?
#15167937
wat0n wrote:Am I wrong about it or what?


Yes.

Why would cops do a coverup in your scenario but not do the same whenever one of their own steals a cell phone?


I never said cops would cover for each other in my initial scenario. I assume this is one of your misunderstandings.

Why? I mean, several MPD members testified against Chauvin. What makes you believe this isn't just his defense lawyer's strategy?


I never claimed it was not also the defense lawyer’s strategy.
#15167940
Pants-of-dog wrote:I never said cops would cover for each other in my initial scenario. I assume this is one of your misunderstandings.


Would you then elaborate further? If the cops refused to take the complaint seriously, they'd be covering it up. They can't just arbitrarily refuse to do so and look for the cell phone, as far as the law is concerned, and that would then lead to further charges to whoever refused to cooperate.

Pants-of-dog wrote:I never claimed it was not also the defense lawyer’s strategy.


I know, which is why I said "just". It seems to be a strategy exclusively being used by the defense.
#15167968
wat0n wrote:.....

I know, which is why I said "just". It seems to be a strategy exclusively being used by the defense.


Lots of conservatives are making the same claims. Go to any of the threads about the ongoing trial and you will see this is implied or openly said by many people.

You could just look up “fentanyl floyd”, as well.
#15167971
Pants-of-dog wrote:Lots of conservatives are making the same claims. Go to any of the threads about the ongoing trial and you will see this is implied or openly said by many people.

You could just look up “fentanyl floyd”, as well.


Right, and we've also seen that kind of argument here. But in the trial, at least, I didn't really see Chauvin's former colleagues claiming that sort of thing. More importantly, even if Floyd was high that wouldn't really change the fact that Chauvin didn't obey the MPD's policies on neck restraints at the time.
#15168000

    The past decade in the U.S. has been marked by a media fascination with the white prescription opioid cum heroin user. In this paper, we contrast media coverage of white non-medical opioid users with that of black and brown heroin users to show how divergent representations lead to different public and policy responses. A content analysis of 100 popular press articles from 2001 and 2011 in which half describe heroin users and half describe prescription opioid users revealed a consistent contrast between criminalized urban black and Latino heroin injectors with sympathetic portrayals of suburban white prescription opioid users. Media coverage of the suburban and rural opioid “epidemic” of the 2000s helped draw a symbolic, and then legal, distinction between (urban) heroin addiction and (suburban and rural) prescription opioid
    addiction that is reminiscent of the legal distinction between crack cocaine and powder cocaine of the 1980s and 90s. This distinction reinforces the racialized deployment of the War on Drugs and is sustained by the lack of explicit discussion of race in the service of “color blind ideology.” We suggest potential correctives to these racially divergent patterns, in the form of socially responsible media practices and of clinical engagement with public policy.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5121004/
#15168099
Pants-of-dog wrote:So we see that the defence is portraying black drug users as violent criminals, and.this tactic has had racist and negative effects on black communities.


Sounds like a chicken and egg type of argument. What comes first here?

Would you then ban expressing these arguments? If so, then I hope you'll advocate for the banning of similar behavior when it comes from the postmodern left.
#15168118
wat0n wrote:Sounds like a chicken and egg type of argument. What comes first here?


It does not matter, since at this point, it is like a self perpetuating cycle.

The racism in the media has to be addressed, and the racism in policing needs to be addressed simultaneously.
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