Is NYC dead forever? - Page 6 - Politics Forum.org | PoFo

Wandering the information superhighway, he came upon the last refuge of civilization, PoFo, the only forum on the internet ...

Political issues and parties in the USA and Canada.

Moderator: PoFo North America Mods

Forum rules: No one line posts please.
User avatar
By Rancid
#15166627
Doug64 wrote:Any links?


There are many articles saying different things, but generally, agree that NYC will recover and do better than most other places

https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/artic ... f=3loXqR2L

This of course, is bad news for affordability, but apparently the market can still bare it.

I don't know why anyone doubted NYC anyway. That's a wonderful city. I've visited numerous times, and have family, as well as friends that live there. That said, i actually still like Chicago better. Then again, I lived in Chicago so i'm biased.

Chicago is hustle and bustle like NYC, but the people are just so much nicer and courteous. :lol: If someone bumps into you Michigan/state/wabash/whatever, they'll say "oh, excuse me". In NYC they'll say "HEY I'M WALKING HERE!!"
By Doug64
#15166827
Rancid wrote:There are many articles saying different things, but generally, agree that NYC will recover and do better than most other places

https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/artic ... f=3loXqR2L

This of course, is bad news for affordability, but apparently the market can still bare it.

That article had a lot of "maybe's" in it, perhaps a certain amount of whistling past the graveyard, and not a lot of actual facts. For how New York is actually doing (though more the state than the city):

New York is slower to recover economically as COVID restrictions loosen across the nation
Flattening job and unemployment trends coupled with rising consumer costs are likely to lengthen the term of New York's economic recovery, which is on a slower pace than parts of the rest of the country, according to an Albany-based think tank.

In April 2020, New York had 1.9 million fewer private-sector jobs than it did the same month the previous year, which came after the state became the center of the coronavirus pandemic in March, the analysis from the Empire Center for Public Policy showed.

For the next five months, the state's job market showed signs of recovery before hitting a lull. As of February of this year, the state still had about one million fewer jobs than it did in February 2020, the analysis from the Empire Center for Public Policy showed.

But E.J. McMahon, the fiscally conservative think tank's founder and senior fellow, said the problem may be worse when compared to the rest of the country.

“It's hard to look at what's happened in New York and not conclude that there's some aspect of our policy that has helped make it worse,” McMahon said. “The states in the Southeast and the South are more likely to return to something closer to the status quo – pre-2020 – than New York.”

Unemployment rate remains high in NY

Preliminary figures from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics estimate New York has the second-highest unemployment rate in the country (8.9%), after the state of Hawaii (9.2%), and just ahead of Connecticut and California (8.5%).

By comparison, the states of South Dakota, Utah and Nebraska have the lowest unemployment rates in the country at 2.9%, 3.0% and 3.1%, respectively.

McMahon said that while New York and Hawaii have had to confront tourism declines and cuts to the service industry during the pandemic, the industry trends in states like Florida and Texas are far more favorable than in the Northeast.

According to the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, the Sunshine State lost approximately 1.3 million jobs from February to April 2020 and recovered at least 735,500 since.

And while the national unemployment rate held at 6% in February, Florida’s unemployment rate reached 4.7%. The state’s unemployment rate last approached 5% at the end of 2015.

McMahon said unemployment trends across states appear tied to the severity of government-mandated restrictions. However, regions like the New York City metropolitan area, which employed a large number of workers in the service industry alongside white collar workers, may see a permanent loss of employment due to remote work.

“The combination of the emptying out of the central business district of New York City, combined with tourism – because travel and tourism in the last quarter century emerged as a much bigger part of the New York City economy – haven’t come back,” McMahon said. "Basically it’s like the worst of both worlds.”

Consumer prices rise as state tries to recover

While state unemployment continues to trend toward a new market equilibrium, McMahon said the changes in purchasing power will leave a far longer-lasting mark in the economy of New York.

“There isn't going to be any getting back to normal.” McMahon said. “We're not going to return at any time to something matching the purchasing and living and patterns and economic cycle of 2019.”

McMahon argues the changes to the consumer price index — that is, the average change in prices over time that consumer pay for a basket of goods and services — increased the cost of living in New York as a result of the pandemic.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the overall CPI from February 2020 to February 2021, increased by 1.7% across all categories. However, the CPI for food increased by 3.6% over the 12-month period. And the CPI for piped natural gas, tobacco and smoking products, and physician services increased by 6.7%, 7% and 5.1%, respectively.

Rising consumer prices tend to hint at inflation, McMahon said. But it may be too early to tell where the economy is headed.

“Right now inflation in general is still low, but there's a lot of worry that it's going to shoot up, so all of these things will have an influence, obviously, on our recovery and are sources of concern,” McMahon said.

GDP falls in New York, nationally

An analysis of real Gross Domestic Product by the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis estimated that while total real GDP fell by 3.5% in 2020, New York’s real GDP decreased by nearly 6%.

The bureau reported the accommodation and food services; arts, entertainment and recreation; and healthcare and social assistance industries led the decrease in GDP nationally.

“Accommodation and food services contributed to the decreases (in real GDP) in all 50 states and the District of Columbia,” the bureau reported. “This industry was also the leading contributor to the decreases in 38 states and the District of Columbia, including New York, the fourth-slowest growing state.”

Outside of the New York City, the New York State Department of Labor said the metro regions with the highest unemployment rate in February in New York were:

  • Buffalo-Niagara Falls (8%), Watertown-Fort Drum (7.9%) and Utica-Rome (7.8%) metro areas.
  • Non-metro counties saw unemployment rise from 5.6% in February 2020 to 7.3% in February.
  • Unemployment rates in Nassau and Suffolk (6.7%), and Orange, Westchester and Rockland counties (6.8%) nearly doubled from February 2020 to February 2021.

New York Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli said the construction industry in New York is the industry farthest along its recovery after regaining three quarters of lost jobs. On the other hand, the educational, government and financial activities industries continue to lose jobs, according to DiNapoli.
User avatar
By Rancid
#15166858
Doug64 wrote:That article had a lot of "maybe's" in it, perhaps a certain amount of whistling past the graveyard, and not a lot of actual facts. For how New York is actually doing (though more the state than the city):


Of course, as it hasn't happened yet. No one can be 100% sure.

Equally so, the "NYC is going to die" articles were also full of maybes.
By late
#15166963
NYC has been around for centuries. It's had more ups and downs than a roller coaster.

It'll bounce back, it'll be different, but that's in the nature of things.

Which I said earlier in the thread. I have a nephew living there, and we're just waiting for him to say it's back enough to be worth a visit.
By Doug64
#15167998
Rancid wrote:Equally so, the "NYC is going to die" articles were also full of maybes.

The articles saying that NYC is in trouble are extrapolations based on the current facts and trends on the ground--an "if this goes on" assessment. That's quite different from "the trends won't continue," that requires an explanation for why.
User avatar
By jimjam
#15168009
Is NYC dead forever? :?:

What is "dead"?
What is "forever"?
Things change, that doesn't mean they are dead.

Is America dead forever now that it is great again ( :lol: ) and one half of the country hates the other half and we get to read about the day's latest mass shooting with our morning coffee? Mass shootings are, after all, nothing more than free speech according to the now bankrupt NRA and the Republican party.

I will grant this, however, I was born in NYC and lived there for 26 way cool years. Where else could you see Eric Clapton and Ginger Baker perform in a small café … etc. ad infinitum. Today I would not even visit NYC. It's way over populated and expensive. It's no fun anymore ….. I had the good years and didn't know it at the time. It is convenient and dumb for "conservative" hate mongers to blame it on "liberals". Wanna play the no win blame game? I'll blame it on greed and the same population bomb that will someday render the human race "dead forever".
Here are some NYC pics I took a long time ago as I roamed the streets:
Image
Prostitute West 42nd street
Image
Gourmet foods, Greenwich Village
Image
Discussing the rules, West Village
Image
Home sweet home, Wall Street
#15168037
Doug64 wrote:The articles saying that NYC is in trouble are extrapolations based on the current facts and trends on the ground--an "if this goes on" assessment. That's quite different from "the trends won't continue," that requires an explanation for why.


Why don't we require an explanation for why trends will continue? Why are we just assuming this is the new normal?

Why are we:

1) Extrapolating from current trends in what is an abnormally depressed economy due to COVID and

2) Assuming NYC is more fucked on average than other places, or just simply considering NYC in vacuum
User avatar
By jimjam
#15168163
Oxymoron wrote:Sure and That is why the lefty cunts are running from all the Democratic shithole's to Red States.

Some brilliant and incisive thinking here ………… :lol:

BTW, here's today's random killing in Fat Donald's Great America:

A gunman walked into the manager’s office of a Stop & Shop grocery store on Long Island on Tuesday and opened fire, killing one person and wounding two others, the police said.

Y'all better go out and buy up a few machine guns before the lefty cunts use daily random killings as an excuse to remove your 2nd amendment rights. :eek:
By Doug64
#15168476
The New York Post has some suggestions for the next NYC mayor:

Safety, comfort: How NYC’s next mayor can lure back commuters who left
Thanks to COVID, most New Yorkers are no longer captive to a five-day-a-week commute. How does the next mayor lure people back without choking the city on traffic?

The pandemic altered Goth­amites’ transportation habits on a scale not seen since the subway opened in 1904, or since the Triborough Bridge opened in 1936 and the city entered the ­automobile age.

Thirteen months into the disruption, subway ridership is just one-third of “normal”; commuter-rail ridership is down by three-fourths. People want to avoid enclosed transit spaces, but even car-based bridge and tunnel traffic is still down by 15 percent.

The only form of organized transit to return to pre-pandemic levels? Citibike. Last December, ridership was 13 percent above the pre-pandemic December. East River bicycle crossings increased by 21 percent last year.

Less activity didn’t make roads safer. With more room for drivers to speed, New York saw 243 traffic deaths last year, a 10.5 percent increase over 2019. Drivers were more dangerous to themselves, with a 76 percent increase in driver, passenger and motorcycle deaths.

Improving safety, too, will have to be part of the transit-restoration agenda. It won’t happen by encouraging people to drive or hail cars: Before the pandemic, three-fourths of people came into Manhattan via mass transit, not in a car.

So the next mayor has to get people back on the subways, but he or she can’t do it without convincing people that transit is safe. A worldwide survey done by Sam Schwartz Engineering showed no statistical correlation between growing (masked) ridership and COVID-19 cases.

Vaccines, too, make people more confident.

In the meantime, mayoral candidates can lead by example, taking subways and buses all over the five boroughs. It wouldn’t hurt for some mayoral candidate to take a spouse or a friend on commuter rail out to Long Island or Westchester for a dinner out — to remind suburbanites we’re here.

Long-term, the mayoral candidates should impress upon Sen. Chuck Schumer that new, federal funding for transit construction projects shouldn’t go toward Gov. Cuomo’s pet projects, like a new “Empire Station Complex” on the West Side that requires large-scale demolition of a functional neighborhood.

Rather, money should go ­to digitizing subway signals, to provide more frequent, cheaper service. Even when the pandemic has faded, people aren’t going to want to pack onto subway cars when they don’t have to.

The city needs more bus-only ­express routes, like 14th Street, to relieve pressure on the subways. And people who don’t feel safe on the subway shouldn’t feel unsafe cycling: The city should step up its build-out of protected bike lanes.

Pedal-assist e-bikes help older people and people who aren’t in the greatest of shape to get around by bike, but they don’t belong with slower bike traffic. Wider bike lanes can make room for both.

And since New Yorkers enjoy outdoor dining, the restaurants will need more room, too.

All in all, it’s time to rethink the streets — and make them nicer to walk or cycle down, too.

Many drivers don’t think much of the wooden horses the de Blasio administration puts out to denote a “shared street”; the barriers are run over or stolen. The next mayor should devote capital funding to a system of retractable posts to block off streets or lanes to car and truck traffic as needed, without throwing junky barriers all over the place.

Bus drivers and approved truck drivers could even use an electronic signal to temporarily retract the barriers to access a delivery-only lane. Rockefeller Center would be a good place to start.

And what about outer-borough areas choked by traffic? The Biden administration wants to provide funding to undo the highway mistakes of the past — so the city should at least study what it would take to improve the Cross-Bronx ­Expressway for its residential neighbors.

Then, on the opposite side of town, there is the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway, still falling down . . . with little interest from the candidates so far.

The streets don’t have to be a disaster area. With some sustained attention, they could be an asset to attract people back.
By late
#15168518
Doug64 wrote:

The city should step up its build-out of protected bike lanes.

Pedal-assist e-bikes help older people and people who aren’t in the greatest of shape to get around by bike, but they don’t belong with slower bike traffic. Wider bike lanes can make room for both.

And since New Yorkers enjoy outdoor dining, the restaurants will need more room, too.

All in all, it’s time to rethink the streets — and make them nicer to walk or cycle down, too.



Much of Europe is making their cities more bike friendly. In some countries, half of all bike sales are ebikes, it's working.



User avatar
By jimjam
#15168536
First-time buyers made up 41.9 percent of home sales in Manhattan last quarter, the highest share in at least seven years.

Homeless is a different issue Hardly. Dump[…]

May 10, Sunday In a small house near Guiney’s […]

Well, if all *the smart people* are doing it, and […]

Big Vehicles: War Wagons

There's a weird dominance thing with some drivers[…]