Key Rasmussen Polls - Page 68 - Politics Forum.org | PoFo

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By Doug64
#15159823
@late, so you'd rather go with polls that generally skew Left, that are Registered Voters or (Reuters) Americans, both which also skew Left. And note that the major difference between Rasmussen and most of the polls is in the Disapprove number, not so much the Approve number.

And actually, no, Biden's RCP average job approval is not going up. His Approve average has been holding steady, while his Disapprove average increased a bit before plateauing as well:

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By late
#15159865
Doug64 wrote:
And actually, no, Biden's RCP average job approval is not going up.



A week ago, the RCP average was above 54, this week, it's above 55.

If you knew statistics, you could have argued that the difference wasn't statistically significant.

You would have also understood that there is more going on here than bias.

That an average is almost always better than a single outlier.
User avatar
By Drlee
#15159872
Have become a joke. At the end of the day they only answer two questions. "Are you a Republican? or Are you a Democrat?"
By Doug64
#15159983
late wrote:A week ago, the RCP average was above 54, this week, it's above 55.

And back on 1-30 Biden's average was 55.8, and on 2-15 it was 55.7. Three days ago it was 55.4 and had been for five days, two days ago it was 55.3. That doesn't sound like Biden's numbers are rising, more like the RCP average has been bouncing up and down between 53.8 and 55.8.

So, another poll, USAToday/Ipsos this time, with comparisons to their poll last June:

Which of the following statements comes closer to your view, even if neither is exactly right?

  • Law and order is the most important thing to ensure, even if it means limiting peaceful protests. 49% (3-21) / 45% (6-20)
  • The right to protest is the most important thing to ensure, even if it means there are some incidents of violence. 31% (3-21) / 44% (6-20)
  • Don't know. 20% (3-21) / 12% (6-20)

For the 3-21 poll, 63% of Republicans and 53% of Independents believed law & order is more important to ensure, while a Democratic plurality of 45% believed the right to protest is more important even if there are violent incidents.

How much do you trust the following, if at all, to promote justice and equal treatment for people of all races? *President Joe Biden was previously asked as Joe Biden

  • US Military 77% (3-21) / 72% (6-20)
  • Local police and law enforcement 69% (3-21) / 56% (6-20)
  • President Joe Biden 58% (3-21) / 51% (6-20)
  • Police unions 52% (3-21) / 40% (6-20)
  • Black Lives Matter 50% (3-21) / 60% (6-20)

For Black Lives Matter, the 3-21 poll had Republicans at 22%, Independents at 39%, and Democrats at 77%. For local police and law enforcement, it was Republicans 88%, Independents 74%, and Democrats 57%.

What is your personal view on the circumstances around the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis?

  • It was murder 36% (3-21) / 60% (6-20)
  • It was negligence on the part of the officer 30% (3-21) / 28% (6-20)
  • It was an accident 8% (3-21) / 3% (6-20)
  • The police officer did nothing wrong 6% (3-21) / 2% (6-20)
  • Something else 3% (3-21) / 2% (6-20)
  • Don't know 17% (3-21) / 4% (6-20)

Which of the following proposals do you support, even if neither is exactly right?

  • Fully fund the budget for police in your community at the same level is it now. 57% (3-21) / 53% (6-20)
  • Take a portion of the budget for police in your community and redirect those funds to social services. 43% (3-21) / 47% (6-20)

84% of Republicans and 62% of Independents said to fully fund law enforcement, 67% of Democrats said to divert funds to social services.

Do you agree or disagree with the following statements?

  • Incidents of police misconduct against Black Americans reflect isolated incidents by a few officers. 52% (Republicans 67%, Independents 48%, Democrats 41%)
  • Incidents of police misconduct against Black Americans reflect systemic racism in law enforcement. 46% (Republicans 20%, Independents 36%, Democrats 74%)
  • Police treat Black Americans fairly. 32% (Republicans 51%, Independents 23%, Democrats 19%)

So after all the marches, protests, and (especially) riots, almost half as many people believe George Floyd was murdered as thought so last June, support for law and order--and the number that trust local law enforcement to promote justice and equal treatment--has grown while those that trust BLM to promote the same has dropped, and the percentage wanting to shift at least some of police budgets to social services has dropped. I would say that all that activism and violence has been a flat-out failure--IMHO because of the violence.
By Doug64
#15161127
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-seven percent (37%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending March 4, 2021. This week’s finding is down one point from a week ago. Fifty-six percent (56%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, remaining the same as a week ago. A year ago at this time, 43% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 52% said it was on the wrong track.

    The Rasmussen Reports Immigration Index for the week of February 28-March 4, 2021 fell to 85.1, down from 86.0 two weeks earlier. This is the lowest it’s been since the Immigration Index began in December 2019, and the third consecutive survey in which the index has reached a new record low. The Immigration Index has been under the baseline in nine consecutive surveys. The index has fallen by 20 points since the week of October 22, indicating voters are looking for tighter immigration control from President Joe Biden’s administration.

    Forty-eight percent (48%) of Likely U.S. Voters agree with the statement: “Allowing transgender individuals to serve in the military does not have any meaningful negative impact on the Armed Forces.” That statement is a direct quote from the executive order Biden signed on January 25. Democrats strongly support Biden’s policy, with 67% approving the statement, and only 25% of Democratic voters disagreeing. However, 60% of Republicans disagree on the impact of transgender troops, and only 32% of GOP voters agree. Among voters not affiliated with either major party, 43% agree that “allowing transgender individuals to serve in the military does not have any meaningful negative impact on the Armed Forces,” and 39% disagree.

    Fifty-two percent (52%) of Likely U.S. Voters say they are concerned that Biden has not held a press conference, including 37% who are Very Concerned. Twenty-four percent (24%) say they’re Not Very Concerned and 22% are Not At All Concerned. At age 78, Biden is the oldest man ever elected president. Only 34% of voters say they are Very Confident that Biden is physically and mentally up to the job of being President of the United States. Another 14% say they are Somewhat Confident in Biden’s capability, while 10% are Not Very Confident and 40% are Not At All Confident. Not surprisingly, voters who lack confidence in Biden’s physical and mental capacity for the presidency are most likely to be concerned that Biden has not yet held a White House press conference. Seventy-six percent (76%) of those who say they are Not At All Confident that Biden is physically and mentally up to the job also say they are Very Concerned that the new president hasn’t held a press conference. By contrast, among voters who say they are Very Confident that Biden is up to the job of being president, 70% are Not At All Concerned that he hasn’t held a press conference yet.

    Sixty-five percent (65%) of Likely U.S. Voters say most politicians want the government to have more power and money than it does today. Nineteen percent (19%) think politicians want government to have less power and money. Sixteen percent (16%) are not sure. Belief that most politicians want more power and money for the government has ranged from 57% to 66% in surveys since 2010. What they say politicians want is the opposite of what voters believe most Americans want. Sixty-two percent (62%) say most Americans want the government to have less power and money than it does today. Twenty-five percent (25%) say Americans want government to have more power and money. Thirteen percent (13%) are not sure.

    Seventy-one percent (71%) of Likely U.S. Voters say policies that encourage economic growth are Very Important. That’s significantly more than the 52% of voters who say policies that encourage economic fairness are Very Important. Only 4% of voters say policies that encourage economic growth are Not Very Important or Not At All Important, whereas 16% say the same about policies that encourage economic fairness. Democrats show a much stronger preference for fairness as a goal of economic policy than do Republicans or voters not affiliated with either major party. Sixty-three percent (63%) of Democrats say encouraging economic fairness is Very Important, compared to 46% of Republicans and 42% of unaffiliated voters.

    Sixty-nine percent (69%) of American Adults say they expect requirements to wear masks in public will be lifted within a year, including 35% who expect mask mandates to end within six months. Those numbers have increased substantially over the past month. In early February, 56% believed mask requirements would end within a year, and just 13% thought mask mandates would end within six months. Sixty-seven percent (67%) of Americans are at least Somewhat Confident in the safety and effectiveness of the COVID-19 vaccine, including 34% who say they’re Very Confident in the vaccine. However, Democrats are more confident than Republicans that the vaccine is safe and effective, even while Republicans are more optimistic that the end of mask requirements and lockdowns is near.

    Fifty-nine percent (59%) of Likely U.S. Voters approve of the relief package that will send checks of as much as $1,400 to Americans hard hit by the COVID-19 pandemic. Thirty-five percent (35%) disapprove. Even while voters express strong support for the bill to help the country recover from the economic impact of the coronavirus pandemic, however, most believe it mainly benefits Democrat-run ‘Red’ states. Fifty-one percent (51%) of Likely Voters agree the statement that the $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief bill “will overwhelmingly benefit Democrat-run states at the expense of Republican-led ones.” Thirty-six percent (36%) disagree and 13% are are not sure. That statement is a direct quote from a column by Republican Sen. Marsha Blackburn and Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee published at the Fox News website this week. Republicans in Congress voted against the COVID-19 relief bill, complaining that 91% of the money in the measure went for things that had nothing to do with the coronavirus pandemic.

    Economic confidence jumped to 109.8 in this month’s Rasmussen Reports Economic Index, up 12 points from February, following three consecutive months of decline since Election Day. In a remarkable shift, Democrats are now more optimistic than Republicans about the economic future. Enthusiasm about the economy surged under President Trump, reaching as high as 147.8 in January 2020 before tumbling after the coronavirus lockdown threw Americans out of work and closed many businesses. By November, it had recovered to 126.4, but dropped sharply after President Biden was elected, falling to 97.8 last month. Thirty percent (30%) of American Adults rate the economy as good or excellent this month, up five points from last month and but still well below the 42% mark in November. The number who rate the economy as poor has decreased to 28%, down four points since February. Twenty-seven percent (27%) now think the economy is getting better, up nine points from last month, but still eight points below November. Forty-seven percent (47%) expect a worsening economy, down nine points from last month, but four points higher than November. Twenty percent (20%) see things staying about the same. There has been a remarkable reversal since President Biden was elected, as Democrats are now more bullish on the economy than Republicans. Thirty-nine percent (39%) of Democrats view the economy as good or excellent, compared to 33% of Republicans and 21% of those not affiliated with either major party. GOP confidence has declined more than 40 points since November, when 74% of Republicans had a positive view of the economy, while Democrats’ confidence has risen seven points from 32% in November. While 68% of Republicans before the election said they expected the economy will improve, only 17% feel that way now. Democrats are now more optimistic, with 46% saying they expect the economy to get better, an increase of 18 points since January. But only 18% of those unaffiliated with either major party now are optimistic that the economy will get better, up five points since January, but five points lower than before the election.

    Here's Biden's job approval for the last week:

    • Strongly Approve: 33%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 50% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 48%

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 33% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 39%
    • Total Approve: 50%
    • Total Disapprove: 48% (+1)

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 34%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 39%
    • Total Approve: 50%
    • Total Disapprove: 47%

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 35%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 50% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 50% (+1)

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 36% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 39%
    • Total Approve: 51% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 49% (+1)

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 37% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 38%
    • Total Approve: 53%
    • Total Disapprove: 47%

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 39% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 30% (+2)
    • Total Approve: 57% (-2)
    • Total Disapprove: 42% (+2)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 39%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 27% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 59% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 40% (+1)

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 40%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 24% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 60% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 38% (+1)
By Doug64
#15162252
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Forty-one percent (41%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending March 11, 2021. This week’s findings are up four points from a week ago. Fifty-four percent (54%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, down two points from a week ago. A year ago at this time, 42% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 54% said it was on the wrong track.

    Fifty-one percent (51%) of American Adults believe they are paying more than their fair share of taxes. That’s down from a previous high of 59% last year, which was the highest level of unhappiness in regular surveying since 2008. Just 27% disagree and don’t believe they pay more than their fair share. Twenty-two percent (22%) are not sure. Biden is reportedly considering a plan that would raise the corporate tax rate from 21 to 28% and raise the income tax rate on individuals making over $400,000. Belief that the rich aren’t paying their fair share of taxes is widespread. Forty-five percent (45%) of Americans believe those who make twice as much as they do aren’t paying twice as much in taxes. Only 28% believe those who earn twice as much are paying at least twice as much taxes as they do, including 7% who think they’re paying more than twice as much. Twenty-seven percent (27%) say they’re not sure.

    Seventy-three percent (73%) of Likely U.S. Voters are concerned about the government’s ability to handle the growing number of migrants at the border while meeting COVID-19 protocols. That includes 48% who say they are Very Concerned. Border crossings have surged since President Joe Biden was elected, and officials in Texas last week expressed alarm at the number of migrants who test positive for the coronavirus and are being released into the United States. Meanwhile, the House of Representatives is expected to vote this week on two separate amnesty bills that would provide legal status to up to 5 million “undocumented” immigrants. Fifty-one percent (51%) of Likely Voters oppose such an amnesty plan, including 35% who Strongly Oppose amnesty. Forty-five percent (45%) say they support amnesty for undocumented immigrants, including 22% who Strongly Support it.

    Forty-seven percent (47%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe Biden is really doing the job of president. The same number (47%) say others are making decisions for Biden behind the scenes. As to the quality of the job Biden is doing as president, most voters apparently don’t believe he’s delivered on his promise of a more united America. Fifty-four percent (54%) say we have become a more divided nation since the election, and only 15% say America is now less divided. Twenty-nine percent (29%) say the level of division as about the same as it was before the election. As might be expected, Republicans are more likely to doubt that Biden is really doing the job of president. Seventy-five percent (75%) of GOP voters say others are making decisions for Biden behind the scenes. However, that view is shared by 56% of voters not affiliated with either major party, and even 15% of Democratic voters believe others are making decisions for Biden behind the scenes.

    Forty-seven percent (47%) of American Adults said they would wear green for St. Patrick’s Day. Thirty-one percent (31%) said they wouldn't wear green and 21% were not sure. Most Americans wouldn’t be joining the crowds at bars for St. Patrick’s Day. Only 29% said they'd have a drink to celebrate the occasion, while 52% said they wouldn’t, and 19% weren’t sure. Both the wearing of green and having a drink for St. Patrick’s Day are most popular among Americans who claim Irish ancestry. Nine percent (9%) of those surveyed say their ancestry is mostly Irish, while another 36% say they have some Irish ancestry. Forty-three percent (43%) say they are not Irish at all, and 13% aren’t sure if they have any Irish ancestry.

    Seventy-five percent (75%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe voters should be required to show photo identification such as a driver’s license before being allowed to vote. Only 21% are opposed to such a requirement. Thirty-six states have enacted some form of voter ID law, but those laws would be nullified if the Senate approves H.R. 1, which passed the House on a party-line vote. Critics say H.R. 1 “would force states to allow anyone to vote who simply signs a form saying that they are who they claim they are.” Support for voter ID laws has actually increased since 2018, when 67% said voters should be required to show photo identification such as a driver’s license before being allowed to vote. Eighty-nine percent (89%) of Republicans support voter ID requirements, as do 60% of Democrats and 77% of voters not affiliated with either major party.

    Sixty-four percent (64%) of Likely U.S. Voters say they oppose increasing taxes. Only 22% support increasing taxes, while 14% say they are not sure. Forty-five percent (45%) of voters say the current level of federal taxes is already too high, while only 13% say federal taxes are too low. Thirty-three percent (33%) say the current level of federal taxation is about right. While Democratic voters are more favorable toward tax increases than other voters, still only 33% of Democrats say they would support increasing taxes and 43% of Democrats oppose a tax increase. Eighty-two percent (82%) of Republicans oppose increasing taxes, as do 70% of voters not affiliated with either major party.

    Forty percent (40%) of American Adults believe the accusations of racism made in last week’s Oprah Winfrey interview with Harry and Meghan. Thirty-two percent (32%) don’t believe the British royals are racist and 27% say they’re not sure. More than 17 million Americans tuned in to see Oprah’s March 7 interview with Prince Harry and his American-born wife, an interview that drew nearly 50 million viewers worldwide. The couple claimed that racism explains why Markle, a former actress who is half-black, felt less than welcome in the royal family. However, only 8% of Americans say they follow news about the British royal family very closely. Another 26% say they follow such news somewhat closely, while 38% follow royal news not very closely and 25% don’t follow at all.

    Here's Biden's job approval for the last week:

    • Strongly Approve: 35% (+2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 39% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 52% (+2)
    • Total Disapprove: 47% (-1)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 33%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 50%
    • Total Disapprove: 48%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 34%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 39%
    • Total Approve: 50%
    • Total Disapprove: 47%

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 31% (-4)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43% (+3)
    • Total Approve: 47% (-3)
    • Total Disapprove: 53% (+3)

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 34% (-2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 50% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 50% (+1)

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 37%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 39% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 52% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 48% (+1)

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 37% (-2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 30%
    • Total Approve: 56% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 42%

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 39%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 29% (+2)
    • Total Approve: 58% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 41% (+1)

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 40%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 25% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 60%
    • Total Disapprove: 38%
By Doug64
#15163271
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Forty-one percent (41%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending March 18, 2021. This week’s remains the same as a week ago. Fifty-four percent (54%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, also the same as a week ago. A year ago at this time, 37% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 57% said it was on the wrong track.

    The Rasmussen Reports Immigration Index for the week of February 28-March 4, 2021 fell to 85.1, down from 86.0 two weeks earlier. This is the lowest it’s been since the Immigration Index began in December 2019, and the third consecutive survey in which the index has reached a new record low. The Immigration Index has been under the baseline in nine consecutive surveys. The index has fallen by 20 points since the week of October 22, indicating voters are looking for tighter immigration control from President Joe Biden’s administration.

    Sixty-seven percent (67%) of Likely U.S. Voters say the current situation with migrants at the U.S.-Mexico border is a crisis. Twenty-three percent (23%) say it’s not a crisis and 10% are not sure. If there is a border crisis, whose fault is it? Fifty-three percent (53%) of voters agree with the statement: “President Biden himself … has caused the [border] crisis with both his rhetoric and his policies.” That’s a quote from column last week by former Trump administration official Ken Cuccinelli. Thirty-eight percent (38%) of voters disagree and 10% are not sure. Voters strongly condemn illegal immigration. Sixty-five percent (65%) agree with the statement: “At no time is it right to break the law and come into the United States illegally.” That’s a quote from House GOP Leader Kevin McCarthy. Twenty-three percent (23%) of voters disagree and 12% are not sure.

    Fifty-eight percent (58%) of American Adults say people should be required to wear masks to protect against COVID-19 until everyone is vaccinated against the coronavirus. Thirty-two percent (32%) disagree and 10% are not sure. That is in line with remarks Biden made at the White House last week, that masks will be necessary “until everyone is, in fact, vaccinated.” At a time when many states are reducing lockdown measures to limit the coronavirus pandemic, 50% of Americans say easing restrictions is likely to lead to a new surge of COVID-19 cases. Thirty-three percent (33%) disagree and 16% are not sure. The COVID-19 vaccine program is apparently successful, as 39% of those surveyed say they have already been vaccinated, and another 59% say someone else in their immediate family has already gotten the COVID-19 vaccine.

    Sixty-five percent (65%) of Likely U.S. Voters think border security is a vital national security interest for the United States these days. Only 20% disagree and 14% say they’re not sure. The number of voters who view border control as a national security problem has increased since February 2019, when 59% said border security is a vital national security interest. Sixty-two percent (62%) of voters say it is more important to gain control of the border than to legalize the status of undocumented workers already living in the United States. Forty percent (31%) put legalizing those already here illegally first. Support for border control has generally outdistanced support for amnesty in regular Rasmussen Reports surveying since 2008.

    Thirty-five percent (35%) of American Adults are at least somewhat likely to buy or lease a car in the next year, slightly down from 38% four years ago, but higher than the 26% where the overall figure hovered in surveys from 2010 to 2015. The new finding includes 16% who are Very Likely to get a new car, compared to 21% four years ago. But most Americans (60%) still have no plans to get a new car, with 39% who say it’s Not At All Likely. More Democrats (43%) than Republicans (27%) say they’re at least somewhat likely to get a new car in the next year. This reflects findings in our most recent Consumer Spending Update, which found Democrats more optimistic than Republicans about the economy. Four years ago, Republicans (44%) were more likely than Democrats (37%) to say they were in the market for a new car. Eleven percent (11%) of Americans say they’re driving more than they were a year ago, while 47% say they’re driving less and 37% say they’re driving about the same amount.

    Fifty-three percent (53%) of Likely U.S. Voters approve of President Biden’s handling of the COVID-19 pandemic, including 35%who Strongly Approve. Forty-four percent (44%) of voters disapprove of how Biden is handling the pandemic, including 29% who Strongly Disapprove. Forty-three percent (43%) of voters say Biden is doing better than former President Donald Trump in handling the COVID-19 pandemic, while 40% rate Biden’s handling of the pandemic worse than Trump’s. Sixteen percent (16%) say Biden’s performance in handling the pandemic is about the same as Trump’s. Not surprisingly, Democrats have the highest opinion of Biden’s handling of the pandemic. Seventy-nine percent (79%) of Democratic voters approve of how Biden has handled COVID-19, including 59% who Strongly Approve. Among GOP voters, only 28% approve of Biden’s handling of the pandemic, while a whopping 68% of Republicans disapprove, including 50% of GOP voters who Strongly Disapprove of how Biden has handled the coronavirus. Voters unaffiliated with either major party are split almost evenly, with 49% approving and 47% disapproving of Biden’s handling of COVID-19.

    Sixty-four percent (64%) of Likely U.S. Voters say it is not possible to completely prevent mass shootings like the ones in Atlanta, Georgia, and Boulder, Colorado. Only 23% believe mass shootings can be completely prevented, while 13% are not sure. On the specific question of whether stricter gun control laws would help prevent mass shootings, a majority (51%) of voters say no, while 39% say yes, and 10% are not sure. Voters are more evenly divided on the general question of gun control. Forty-six percent (46%) say the United States needs stricter gun-control laws, while 49% disagree. Democrats (77%) overwhelmingly favor stricter gun-control laws, which are opposed by a solid majority of other voters. Seventy-one percent (71%) of Republicans are against stricter gun-control laws, as are 60% of voters not affiliated with either major party.

    Forty-nine percent (49%) of American Adults believe it possible for just about anyone in the United States to work their way out of poverty. That’s a six-point decline from April 2019, and the lowest finding since 2014 in regular surveys. Of those with full-time jobs, only 40% say they expect to be earning more money a year from now – a 13-point decline from April 2019 – while 13% say they’ll be earning less in a year and 43% expect their earnings to remain about the same. Economic confidence soared after Donald Trump was elected president, but was hard hit by the COVID-19 pandemic that emerged in early 2020, and declined again after President Biden was elected. While a majority (57%) of Americans say it is possible for anyone who really wants to work to find a job, that’s a 12-point decline from 2019, when 69% say anyone could find a job.

    And Biden's job approval for the last week takes a big dip. Unlike Trump and Obama for this week/month/to-date there's no corresponding drop in the monthly or to-date numbers, meaning that it has to be the downcurve of a hump. This almost certainly has to be because of the unfolding crisis at the border, and Biden's assertion that nothing's changed can't be much of a help--that's like claiming that because the tides regularly roll in and out, that tsunami isn't really any different:

    • Strongly Approve: 31% (-4)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 42% (+3)
    • Total Approve: 48% (-4)
    • Total Disapprove: 50% (+3)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 33%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 50%
    • Total Disapprove: 48%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 34%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 39%
    • Total Approve: 50%
    • Total Disapprove: 47%

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 31%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43%
    • Total Approve: 47%
    • Total Disapprove: 53%

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 33% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 41% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 49% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 51% (+1)

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 36% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 39%
    • Total Approve: 51% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 49% (+1)

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 36% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 31% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 56%
    • Total Disapprove: 43% (+1)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 38% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 30%
    • Total Approve: 57% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 42% (+1)

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 39% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 26% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 59% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 39% (+1)
User avatar
By Drlee
#15163364
Here is a surprise post for you @Doug64

Biden is taking a hit because he is fucking up his response to a huge influx of illegal aliens. It is going to get worse and it WILL cost the democrats the Whitehouse in 2024. Maybe even the house and Senate in 2022.
By Doug64
#15163415
@Drlee, we do agree on rare occasions, though I’m always surprised when that happens. In this case, yeah, the Democrats have talked themselves into a corner. The only way they can stop the border surge is through Trump’s methods or others as hard on the undocumented aliens trying cross, and until they do that the crisis will continue. They can count on the MSM(D) to do its part to help them—the Associated Press has already instructed its employees not to use the word “crisis” when talking about the border despite being perfectly happy to use the word during the Trump presidency—but that probably isn’t going to be enough.
By Doug64
#15164765
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-seven percent (37%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending March 25, 2021. This week’s finding is down four points from a week ago. Fifty-seven percent (57%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, up three points from a week ago. A year ago at this time, 40% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 54% said it was on the wrong track.

    Seventy-six percent (76%) of Likely U.S. Voters say the U.S. Constitution guarantees the right of an average citizen to own a gun. Only 16% disagree, while 8% say they’re not sure. Asked whether they support repealing the Second Amendment, which guarantees the right of most citizens to own guns, only 27% said they support repeal, while 62% are opposed and 11% are not sure. The Second Amendment’s popularity has increased since we last asked these questions in 2018. Despite this widespread belief in gun ownership as a constitutional right, however, 40% of Democratic voters favor repealing the Second Amendment, not much less than the 46% of Democrats who oppose repeal. Among Republicans, 72% oppose repealing the Second Amendment, as do 70% of voters not affiliated with either major party.


    Forty-one percent (41%) of Likely U.S. Voters say they support changing the Senate rules to eliminate the filibuster, which would make a simple majority enough to pass any legislation. Forty-nine percent (49%) of voters oppose eliminating the filibuster and 11% are not sure. In the Senate, a filibuster can prevent a vote from taking place unless 60 senators agree to end debate (a motion known as “cloture”). Democrats have a majority in the House of Representatives and, with Vice President Kamala Harris to cast tie-breaking voters in the 50-50 Senate, the filibuster rule is the only thing preventing Democrats from passing whatever legislation they wish. Perhaps not surprisingly, Democratic voters now strongly favor eliminating the filibuster rule. Sixty-five percent (65%) of Democrats support elimination of the filibuster, with just 24% of Democrats against ending the longstanding Senate rule. Sixty-eight percent (68%) of Republican voters are against eliminating the filibuster, an opinion shared by 59% of voters not affiliated with either major party.

    Sixty-eight percent (68%) of American Adults say they're paying more for a gallon of gas today compared to six months ago, and 78% think it’s likely those prices will continue to climb over the next six months. This includes 62% who think it’s Very Likely they’ll be paying even more for a gallon of gas in six months than they are today. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, the retail price of a gallon of gasoline has increased about 75 cents since Election Day, rising from $2.11 to $2.87. Increasing fuel prices are apparently more noticeable to middle-income Americans than to either the rich or the poor. Seventy-nine percent (79%) of those earning $30,000-$50,000 a year say they’re paying more at the pump compared to six months ago, as do 74% of those earning $50,000-$100,000 a year. However, among those earning less than $30,000, only 63% say they’re paying more for gas, and among those earning more than $200,000, just 49% have noticed higher gas prices.

    Fifty-eight percent (58%) of Likely U.S. Voters rank cost as the biggest problem with health care. A distant second is the quality of health care, ranked as the biggest problem by 14%. Eleven percent (11%) feel the availability of care is the biggest problem with health care in America today, while another eight percent (8%) say it’s something else. The cost of health care has been the overriding concern of voters since the debate over Obamacare first began in 2009. When asked which would do more to reduce health care costs, 62% of voters say more free market competition. Just 28% think more government regulation would lower those costs, while 11% are not sure. These findings also have changed little in regular surveying for years. During last year’s presidential campaign, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders championed universal health care as “Medicare for All,” but lost the Democratic Party nomination to Joe Biden, who suggested he would veto such legislation.

    Forty-four percent (44%) of Likely U.S. Voters say requiring proof of COVID-19 vaccination to return to pre-pandemic activities is a good idea. Forty-one percent (41%) say it’s a bad idea, and 15% are not sure. White House press secretary Jen Psaki confirmed Monday that federal officials would work with private companies on the development of a “vaccine passport.” The plan has been widely criticized, with Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis declaring it a “terrible idea … completely unacceptable” to require proof of vaccination. Support for a “vaccine passport” is higher among voters who have already been vaccinated against the coronavirus. Sixty-two percent (62%) of those who say they’ve gotten the COVID-19 vaccine believe it’s a good idea to require proof of vaccination to return to pre-pandemic activities, while only 29% of those who haven’t gotten the vaccine yet agree. Fifty-seven percent (57%) of the unvaccinated say it’s a bad idea to require proof of vaccination.

    Seventy-two percent (72%) of American Adults believe Jesus Christ was the Son of God who came to Earth to die for our sins. Seventeen percent (17%) don’t believe that to be true. Seventy percent (70%) believe Jesus rose from the dead, but 18% do not. Twelve percent (12%) are not sure. According to the Bible, Jesus was crucified on a Friday – celebrated by Christians as Good Friday – and resurrected on Sunday, the holiday celebrated as Easter. Belief in the central tenets of Christian faith has declined slightly since 2016, when 75% believed Jesus rose from the dead.

    Forty percent (40%) of American Adults say they will attend a church service to celebrate Easter this year. Forty-seven percent (47%) say they won’t attend church for Easter and 13% are not sure. The number who plan to attend church for Easter this year is significantly down from previous surveys, which have ranged from 46% to 59% in earlier years. Forty percent (40%) consider Easter, the day Christians believe marks the resurrection of Jesus Christ, one of our nation’s most important holidays. Fourteen percent (14%) say Easter is one of the least important holidays and 39% say it’s somewhere in between. These findings are similar to those in earlier surveys. Christmas, the holiday that celebrates the birth of Jesus, remains the top holiday of the year for most Americans, followed by the Fourth of July and Thanksgiving.

    The president earned a monthly job approval of 49% in March, down one point from 50% in his first full month in office. Forty-eight percent (48%) disapproved of his job performance last month, up from 47% in February. Donald Trump’s monthly approval ran from a high of 51% in February 2017, his first full month in the White House, to a low of 42% in August 2017. This past December, his final full month in office, Trump earned a monthly job approval of 47%. Forty-three percent (51%) disapproved.

    Biden's job approval for the last week holds steady, though still underwater:

    • Strongly Approve: 32% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 41% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 48%
    • Total Disapprove: 50%

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 33%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 41% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 49% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 49% (+1)

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 34%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 50%
    • Total Disapprove: 48% (+1)

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 27% (-4)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 45% (+2)
    • Total Approve: 44% (-3)
    • Total Disapprove: 56% (+3)

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 31% (-2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43% (+2)
    • Total Approve: 47% (-2)
    • Total Disapprove: 53% (+2)

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 35% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 51%
    • Total Disapprove: 49%

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 36%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 30%
    • Total Approve: 57% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 42% (-1)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 37% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 30%
    • Total Approve: 57%
    • Total Disapprove: 42%

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 39%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 26%
    • Total Approve: 59%
    • Total Disapprove: 39%
By Doug64
#15165921
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-eight percent (38%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending April 1, 2021. This week’s finding is up one point from a week ago. Fifty-six percent (56%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, down one point from a week ago. A year ago at this time, 39% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 55% said it was on the wrong track.

    The Rasmussen Reports Immigration Index for the week of March 28-April 1, 2021 rose to 84.9, up from 82.3 two weeks earlier. This is the first time the index has increased since Election Day, following four consecutive surveys in which the index reached new record lows. The Immigration Index has been under the baseline in every survey since Election Day last year. The index is still more than 20 points below where it was the week of October 22, indicating voters are looking for tighter immigration control from President Joe Biden’s administration.

    Forty-eight percent (48%) of Likely U.S. Voters say Chauvin should be found guilty. Twenty-one percent (21%) disagree, and 31% are not sure. Floyd died during an arrest last May after Chauvin kneeled on his neck for nine minutes. Video of Floyd's death went viral, prompting protests that turned to riots in Minneapolis and other cities. Chauvin is on trial for charges of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. Three other former Minneapolis officers involved in Floyd's arrest will face trial later. During the presidential campaign, Joe Biden supported the protests, promising action on “systemic racism,” but most voters don’t think the country’s racial problems have improved. Only 22% say race relations in America have gotten better since Biden was elected president. Forty percent (40%) say race relations have gotten worse since the election, while 34% say race relations are about the same.

    Seventy-five percent (75%) of Likely U.S. Voters say requiring voters to show photo identification such as a driver’s license before being allowed to vote is necessary to “a fair and secure election process.” Nineteen percent (19%) disagree. President Joe Biden has led the attack on Georgia’s law requiring voter ID, calling it “Jim Crow on steroids,” inspiring boycott campaigns against the state. Fifty percent (50%) of voters say they oppose boycotts against Georgia, while 37% support the boycotts and 13% are not sure. Support for voter ID requirements is strong across party lines. Eighty-nine percent (89%) of Republicans say requiring voters to show photo identification such as a driver’s license before being allowed to vote is necessary to “a fair and secure election process.” Sixty-five percent (65%) of Democrats agree, as do 71% of voters not affiliated with either major party.

    Thirty-three percent (33%) of Likely U.S. Voters trust the political news they are getting. Most (53%) do not. Fourteen percent (14%) are not sure. Those findings almost exactly match the numbers in an August 2019 survey, when media distrust was at an all-time high. Fifty-four percent (54%) of voters now believe most reporters when they write or talk about Biden are trying to help the president pass his agenda. Ten percent (10%) think reporters are trying to block Biden from passing his agenda. Only 27% think most reporters are simply interested in reporting the news in an unbiased manner. In 2019, 51% of voters believed most reporters were trying block President Trump from passing his agenda.

    Twenty percent (20%) of American Adults say they will wait until May 17 to file their income taxes. Forty percent (40%) have already filed, while another 30% intend to do so by April 15. Ten percent (10%) are not sure. Early last month, before the IRS announced the extended deadline, Americans were filing their taxes at a slightly slower pace than in 2020, although the number who expected a refund was about the same. Only 6% planned to get an extension. Twenty-two percent (22%) of Americans are now concerned that the IRS will audit their taxes, with 6% who are Very Concerned. That compares to 30% and 13% respectively last year. This year’s audit concerns are more consistent with annual surveying for over the past 10 years.

    Fourteen percent (14%) of voters rate Biden as excellent on his handling of issues related to immigration. Another 21% rate his handling of immigration as good and 11% say Biden is doing a fair job on immigration. However, 50% rate Biden’s handling of immigration issues as poor. Voters give Biden somewhat better marks on his handling of economic issues – 23% say he’s doing an excellent job, 19% rate him good on his handling of the economy, with 10% saying he’s doing a fair job and 46% rating him poor. Biden’s ratings on immigration issues, however, are far worse than former President Trump’s. In July 2019, 34% of voters rated Trump excellent on his handling of immigration and another 12% said Trump was doing a good job on immigration.

    Forty percent (40%) of Likely U.S. Voters say moving the All-Star Game was a good idea. Forty-six percent (46%) say it was a bad idea. Sixteen percent (16%) are not sure. MLB announced it would move the All-Star Game from Atlanta after President Joe Biden went on ESPN to condemn the new Georgia voting law as “Jim Crow on steroids.” Opinions on MLB’s decision to punish Georgia split along party lines. Sixty percent (60%) of Democratic voters say it was a good idea to move baseball’s All-Star Game from Atlanta to Denver. Majorities of Republicans (62%) and voters not affiliated with either major party (51%) say moving the All-Star Game was a bad idea. On the more general issue of mixing sports and politics, 57% of all Likely Voters think it’s a bad idea for athletes and sports teams to get involved in political controversies. Thirty-four percent (34%) think it’s a good idea.

    Economic confidence rose to 114.1 in this month’s Rasmussen Reports Economic Index, up more than four points from March, the second consecutive monthly increase. Enthusiasm about the economy surged under President Trump, reaching as high as 147.8 in January 2020 before tumbling after the coronavirus lockdown threw Americans out of work and closed many businesses. By November, it had recovered to 126.4, but dropped sharply in the three months after President Biden was elected, falling to 97.8 in February. Thirty percent (34%) of American Adults rate the economy as good or excellent this month, up four points from last month and but still well below the 42% mark in November. The number who rate the economy as poor has decreased to 27%, down one point since March. Thirty-one percent (31%) now think the economy is getting better, up four points from last month, but still four points below November. Forty-five percent (45%) expect a worsening economy, down two points from last month, but two points higher than November. Twenty percent (20%) see things staying about the same, a number that has held steady since January. There has been a remarkable reversal since President Biden was elected, as Democrats are now more bullish on the economy than Republicans. Forty-four percent (44%) of Democrats view the economy as good or excellent, compared to 29% of Republicans and 27% of those not affiliated with either major party. GOP confidence has declined 45 points since November, when 74% of Republicans had a positive view of the economy, while Democrats’ confidence has risen 12 points from 32% in November. While 68% of Republicans before the election said they expected the economy will improve, only 16% feel that way now. Democrats are now more optimistic, with 49% saying they expect the economy to get better, an increase of 21 points since January. Twenty-five percent (25%) of those unaffiliated with either major party now are optimistic that the economy will get better, up seven points from February, and now two points higher than before the election.

    Biden's job approval for the last week improved slightly, though still barely underwater:

    • Strongly Approve: 31% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 41%
    • Total Approve: 49% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 50%

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 32% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 41%
    • Total Approve: 49%
    • Total Disapprove: 49%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 33% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 50%
    • Total Disapprove: 48%

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 27%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 45%
    • Total Approve: 44%
    • Total Disapprove: 56%

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 29% (-2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 44% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 46% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 54% (+1)

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 34% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 50% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 50% (+1)

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 35% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 30%
    • Total Approve: 57%
    • Total Disapprove: 43% (+1)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 36% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 30%
    • Total Approve: 56% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 42%

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 39%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 26%
    • Total Approve: 59%
    • Total Disapprove: 39%
By Doug64
#15167791
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-nine percent (39%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending April 8, 2021. This week’s finding is up one point from a week ago. Fifty-six percent (56%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, remaining the same as a week ago. A year ago at this time, 37% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 57% said it was on the wrong track.

    Forty-eight percent (48%) of American Adults believe raising the hourly minimum wage will help the U.S. economy, up from 42% two years ago. Thirty-three percent (33%) think raising the minimum wage will hurt the economy instead, while 10% say it will have no impact. Nine percent (9%) are undecided. Belief that raising the minimum wage will be good for the economy has consistently been higher than doubts about its impact in surveys since 2013 when President Obama proposed an increase in his State of the Union address. Forty-nine percent (49%) of Americans correctly recognize that the national hourly minimum wage in the United States is $7.25. Just three percent (3%) say the minimum wage is less than that, while 38% say it’s higher, including 25% who think it’s $10.50 or higher. Ten percent (10%) are not sure. Only 14% think the minimum wage should remain at $7.25 an hour where they live. Eighty percent (80%) say it should be raised, with nearly two-thirds (64%) saying it should be $10.50 or higher. However, only 31% favor raising the hourly wage to $15 or higher. Two years ago, 58% supported raising the minimum to $10.50 or higher, and 21% favored raising it to $15 an hour.

    Twenty-nine percent (29%) of Likely U.S. Voters say laws requiring photo identification at the polls discriminate against some voters. Sixty-two percent (62%) say voter ID laws don’t discriminate. A majority (51%) of voters believe it is likely that cheating affected the outcome of the 2020 presidential election, including 35% who say it’s Very Likely cheating affected the election. Seventy-four percent (74%) of Republicans believe it is likely last year’s presidential election was affected by cheating, a view shared by 30% of Democrats and 51% of voters not affiliated with either major party.

    Twenty-one percent (21%) of Likely U.S. Voters rate the way Congress is doing its job as good or excellent. Fifty-four percent (54%) say it’s doing a poor job. Those numbers haven’t changed much since last summer, before the election that saw Democrats lose 12 seats in the House of Representatives. Historically, positive ratings for Congress have only reached 25% once (in February 2017) in regular surveying by Rasmussen Reports since 2007. Poor findings routinely ran in the 60s and 70s from 2011 through 2014. Thirty-one percent (31%) now believe their representative in Congress is the best possible person for the job. Forty-three percent (43%) disagree, while 26% are not sure.

    Eighteen percent (18%) of Likely U.S. Voters rate the way Congress is doing its job as good or excellent. Fifty-one percent (51%) say it’s doing a poor job. These findings have changed little over the past year. Congress’ positives hit a recent high of 24% in October 2018. Poor findings routinely ran in the 60s and 70s from 2011 through 2014. Thirty-three percent (33%) now believe their representative in Congress is the best possible person for the job, continuing the more positive assessment voters have had in recent years. Forty-two percent (42%) still disagree, while 26% are not sure. Similarly, 35% of voters think their local representative in Congress deserves to be reelected. Forty-two percent (42%) don’t share that view. Twenty-three percent (23%) are undecided. These views are consistent with findings over the last five years.

    Seventy-three (73%) of American Adults think English should be the official language of the United States. Only 18% disagree. However, support for English as the official language of the U.S. government has been trending downward in Rasmussen Reports surveys since 2006. Two years ago, 77% supported official English, and the number was 83% as recently as 2014. When asked more specifically if election ballots and other official government documents should be printed in English only, however, a majority of Americans now approve multilingualism. Forty percent (40%) favor English only, down from 47% two years ago, while 53% think ballots and other documents also should be printed in other languages. Here, too, support for English-only has declined over the years. Sixty-eight percent (68%) of Likely U.S. Voters favored ballots and other government documents only in English in 2006.

    Seventy-eight (78%) of Likely U.S. Voters say it’s likely the Minneapolis jury will convict Chauvin, including 38% who say a guilty verdict is Very Likely. Only 15% think it’s likely the former policeman will be acquitted. When video of Chauvin kneeling on Floyd’s neck went viral last summer, it sparked protests that quickly turned violent. Now, most voters expect riots after the trial, whatever the jury’s verdict may be. Seventy-eight percent (78%) say it’s likely the verdict in the Minneapolis police trial will cause riots, including 46% who say riots are Very Likely. Just 14% say riots aren’t likely after the Chauvin trial verdict. Although President Joe Biden has condemned riots and looting just this week, after another police shooting in a Minneapolis suburb, most voters say the president identifies more with rioters than with police. Fifty percent (50%) say that, in violent protest situations, Biden identifies more with the protesters, while 9% of voters say the president identifies more with police, and 33% say Biden tries to stay impartial.

    Twenty-four percent (24%) of American Adults are even Somewhat Confident that social media companies like Facebook protect the personal data they collect from users. Only 4% say they’re Very Confident social media protects personal data, while 27% are Not Very Confident and 44% are Not Confident At All. Hackers reportedly published stolen personal information from more than half a billion Facebook users. Americans don’t trust Facebook with their data, but most have no problem trusting Internet businesses with their financial information. Sixty-two percent (62%) are comfortable using their credit cards for online purchases, including 22% who say they’re Very Comfortable. Thirty-four percent (34%) aren’t comfortable using their credit cards for online purchases, including 13% who are Not At All Comfortable. More than half (55%) say America’s increasing reliance on the Internet for business and financial transactions make the economy more or less vulnerable to attack. Only 9% say Internet commerce makes America less vulnerable, while 27% say the level of risk is about the same.

    Seventy-four percent (74%) of Likely U.S. Voters rate the performance of the police in the area where they live as good or excellent. Just eight percent (8%) give them poor marks. Positive ratings for local police are up from 67% last June, and equal the high of 74% in 2019. Only 15% of voters believe most police officers are racist. Sixty-six percent (66%) say most cops aren’t racist. Nineteen percent (19%) are not sure. Those numbers are about the same as in last June’s survey, which was taken in the immediate aftermath of George Floyd’s death that sparked violent protests in Minneapolis and other major cities.

    Biden's job approval has continued to improve, now above water:

    • Strongly Approve: 32% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 50% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 48% (-2)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 32%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 41%
    • Total Approve: 49%
    • Total Disapprove: 49%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 33%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 50%
    • Total Disapprove: 48%

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 29% (+2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43% (-2)
    • Total Approve: 47% (+3)
    • Total Disapprove: 53% (-3)

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 29%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 42% (-2)
    • Total Approve: 46%
    • Total Disapprove: 54%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 34%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 50%
    • Total Disapprove: 50%

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 35%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 31% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 55% (-2)
    • Total Disapprove: 44% (+1)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 36%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 30%
    • Total Approve: 56%
    • Total Disapprove: 43% (+1)

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 38% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 27% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 58% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 40% (+1)
By Doug64
#15168997
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Forty percent (40%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending April 15, 2021. This week’s finding is up one point from a week ago. Fifty-five percent (55%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, down one point from a week ago. A year ago at this time, 37% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 57% said it was on the wrong track.

    The Rasmussen Reports Immigration Index for the week of April 11-15, 2021 fell to 83.7, down from 84.9 two weeks earlier. The index is now just slightly above last month’s record low of 82.3. The Immigration Index has been under the baseline in every survey since Election Day last year. The index remains more than 20 points below where it was the week of October 22, indicating voters are looking for tighter immigration control from President Joe Biden’s administration.

    Forty-eight percent (48%) of Likely U.S. Voters say Biden’s decision to withdraw U.S. forces from Afghanistan by September 11 is a good idea. Thirty-two percent (32%) say the Afghanistan withdrawal is a bad idea and 20% are not sure. America has had troops in Afghanistan since October 7, 2001, when the hunt to kill or capture Osama Bin Laden and Al-Qaeda began after the September 11 terrorist attacks. Thirty-six percent (36%) of voters believe withdrawing U.S. troops from Afghanistan will increase the risk of terrorist attacks against America. Fourteen percent (14%) say the withdrawal will decrease the risk of terrorist attacks. Thirty-nine percent (39%) say the withdrawal from Afghanistan will not make much difference in the risk of terrorist attacks, and 11% are not sure.

    Thirty-three percent (33%) of Likely U.S. Voters are in favor of increasing the number of justices on the Supreme Court. Fifty-five percent (55%) are opposed and 13% are not sure. However, when voters are broken down by party allegiance, opinions are divided, with 54% of Democratic voters saying they favor increasing the number of Supreme Court justices, while 77% of Republicans and 58% of voters not affiliated with either major party are opposed. Asked more specifically about the congressional plan to increase the number of justices from nine to 13, voters are slightly more favorable. Forty percent (40%) approve of the plan, including 17% who strongly approve. But 52% disapprove increasing the Supreme Court to 13 seats, including 44% who strongly disapprove the plan.

    Thirty-seven percent (37%) of American Adults say the company’s stand against the new Georgia law makes them less likely to purchase Coca-Cola products. Twenty-five percent (25%) say they are more likely to buy Coke, but 30% say the company’s political stance doesn’t make much difference. Fifty-two percent (52%) of Republicans say they are less likely to buy Coca-Cola because of the company’s involvement in the Georgia election law controversy, as do 24% of Democrats and 38% of those unaffiliated with either major party. By more than a 3-to-1 margin Americans oppose big business trying to influence politics. Sixty-two percent (62%) say it’s a bad idea for corporations to become involved in political controversies, and only 20% think it’s a good idea. Seventeen percent (17%) are not sure.

    Sixty-three percent (63%) of American Adults are concerned the growing criticism of America's police will lead to a shortage of police officers and reduce public safety in the community where they live. That includes 37% who are Very Concerned. Nineteen percent (19%) are Not Very Concerned that anti-police criticism will reduce public safety and 10% are Not At All Concerned. Sixty-two percent (62%) of Americans say being a police officer is one of the most important jobs in our country today. Twenty-three percent (23%) disagree and 15% are not sure. The overall responses have changed little since Rasmussen Reports asked the same questions last June. However, whites are now more concerned about public safety than they were, while concerns have decreased among blacks.

    Sixty percent (60%) of American Adults have volunteered their time or donated money to help clean up the environment. That’s down from 65% in 2017, which was the highest in our survey history. Thirty-three percent (33%) have not contributed time or money to green efforts. However, only 36% believe Earth Day, established in 1970, has helped raise the environmental awareness of most of their fellow Americans. Thirty-three percent (38%) disagree, while 25% are not sure. The number who think the holiday has raised awareness is the lowest measured since 2011. Among Americans who have donated time or money to cleaning up the environment, however, 45% credit Earth Day with raising environmental awareness.

    Seventy percent (70%) of American Adults agree with the jury’s guilty verdict for Derek Chauvin, including 46% who Strongly Agree. Only 20% disagree with Chauvin’s conviction, including 7% who Strongly Disagree. However, 58% believe politics influenced the outcome of Chauvin’s trial, including 38% who say politics had a lot of influence on the trial. Democrats (87%) are more likely than Republicans (58%) or those unaffiliated with either major party (66%) to agree with the guilty verdict for Chauvin. A majority (53%) of Republicans believe politics had a lot of influence on the trial’s outcome, as do 24% of Democrats and 39% of those unaffiliated with either major party.

    Twenty-four percent (24%) of American Adults believe race relations in the nation today are good or excellent, including just seven percent (7%) who rate them as excellent. That outlook is significantly worse than in January 2020, when 34% said race relations were good or excellent. Forty-four percent (44%) now give U.S. race relations a poor rating, up from 31% in January 2020. Fifty-four percent (54%) now say race relations in America are getting worse, an all-time high – up from 41% in January 2020 and eclipsing the previous high of 52% in June 2017. Only 16% now say race relations in America are getting better, while 24% believe race relations are staying about the same. While negative views of U.S. race relations now prevail across all demographic categories, blacks (11%) and other minorities (9%) are more likely than whites (6%) to rate America’s race relations as excellent.

    Biden's job approval holds steady, though his strong support weakens slightly:

    • Strongly Approve: 31% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 41% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 50%
    • Total Disapprove: 48%

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 31% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 41%
    • Total Approve: 49%
    • Total Disapprove: 49%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 33%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 50%
    • Total Disapprove: 48%

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 31% (+2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 39% (-4)
    • Total Approve: 49% (+2)
    • Total Disapprove: 51% (-2)

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 29%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 46%
    • Total Disapprove: 54%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 34%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 50%
    • Total Disapprove: 50%

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 35%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 31%
    • Total Approve: 55%
    • Total Disapprove: 44%

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 35% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 30%
    • Total Approve: 56%
    • Total Disapprove: 43%

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 38%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 27%
    • Total Approve: 58%
    • Total Disapprove: 40%
By Doug64
#15170309
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-nine percent (39%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending April 22, 2021. This week’s finding is down one point from a week ago. Fifty-five percent (55%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, remaining the same as a week ago. A year ago at this time, 35% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 58% said it was on the wrong track.

    Fifty-one percent (51%) of Likely U.S. Voters have an unfavorable impression of Harris, including 43% who have a Very Unfavorable impression of Joe Biden’s vice president. Forty-six percent (46%) of Likely Voters have a favorable impression of Harris, including 28% who have a Very Favorable view of her. Forty-six percent (46%) of voters believe Harris is qualified to assume the responsibilities of the presidency, including 31% who say she is Very Qualified. However, a majority (50%) say Harris is not qualified to become president, including 41% who say she is Not At All qualified. As might be expected, Harris’s ratings are lowest among GOP voters. Only 25% of Republicans believe Harris is qualified to assume the responsibilities of the presidency, compared to 80% of Democrats and 36% of voters not affiliated with either major party.

    Fifty five percent (55%) of Likely U.S. Voters say comments critical of the police by some politicians make it more dangerous for police officers to do their jobs. Twenty-seven percent (27%) disagree and say critical comments from politicians improve the quality of the police’s performance. Ten percent (10%) believe comments from politicians have no impact on police. After a jury last week convicted a Minneapolis police officer of murder in the death of George Floyd, President Joe Biden accused police of “systemic racism.” Only 33% of voters believe President Biden’s statements and policies since his election have made public safety better. Forty-nine percent (49%) say Biden has made public safety worse. Thirteen percent (13%) say Biden’s statements and policies have had no impact on public safety. Similarly, just 34% of voters say Biden has brought Americans of different races closer together, while 49% say Biden has driven the races further apart. Another 12% say Biden’s words and actions have had no major impact on America’s racial divide either way.

    Sixty-five percent (65%) of Likely U.S. Voters say the country needs stricter enforcement of existing gun control laws. Twenty-seven percent (27%) disagree. However, only 48% of voters say the U.S. needs stricter gun laws, while 45% disagree. Support for gun control has declined since an August 2019 survey that found 64% of voters believed the U.S. needed stricter gun control laws. The consensus in favor of stricter enforcement is solid across racial lines. Fifty-two percent (52%) of whites, 50% of black voters and 49% of other racial minorities believe stricter enforcement of existing laws would do more to reduce gun violence than passing new gun control laws. However, Democrats are substantially more in favor of gun control than other voters. Seventy-six percent (76%) of Democratic voters say the United States needs stricter gun control laws, a belief shared by only 25% of Republicans and 41% of voters not affiliated with either major party.

    Sixty-nine percent (69%) of American Adults have confidence in the safety and effectiveness of the COVID-19 vaccine, including 38% who say they are Very Confident in the vaccine. Twenty-eight percent (28%) are not confident in the vaccine, including 12% who are Not At All Confident. Eighty-two percent (82%) of Democrats have confidence in the safety and effectiveness of the COVID-19 vaccine, including 53% who are Very Confident. But only 56% of Republicans are confident in the vaccine, including 31% who are Very Confident. Among those unaffiliated with either major party, 64% have confidence in the safety and effectiveness of the COVID-19 vaccine, including 30% who are Very Confident. Fifty-nine percent (59%) of American Adults say they have been vaccinated against COVID-19, and 69% say someone in their immediate family has gotten the vaccine.

    Seventy-one percent (71%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe that individuals should be required to prove they are legally allowed to be in the United States before they receive local, state or federal government services. This is down from 76% two years ago. Twenty-eight percent (28%) of voters say illegal immigrants should have the same legal rights and protections that U.S. citizens have, but most voters (60%) disagree. That, too, is down from 63% two years ago. Eleven percent (11%) are undecided. Sixty-three percent (63%) of voters believe the availability of government money and services draws illegal immigrants to the United States. That’s up from 59% two years ago, but below the high of 66% in March 2010. Twenty-four percent (24%) disagree, while 12% are not sure.

    Thirty-six percent (36%) of Likely U.S. Voters say Biden’s first 100 days first 100 days in office have been a success. Forty-four percent (44%) say Biden’s first 100 days have been a failure, and 18% say it’s been somewhere in between. Only 26% of voters say Biden has proven to be a better president than they expected. Thirty-nine percent (39%) say Biden has proven to be a worse president then they expected, and 33% say Biden’s performance as president has been about what they thought it would be. Biden’s presidency continues to be shadowed by the belief that cheating affected the outcome of last year’s election. While 48% of voters say Biden won the election fairly last November, 39% disagree and 13% are not sure. Sixty-nine percent (69%) of Republican voters don’t believe Biden won the election fairly, a belief shared by 13% of Democrats and 36% of voters not affiliated with either major party.

    Eighteen percent (18%) of Likely U.S. Voters say socialism is a better system than capitalism. More than three times as many voters (65%) say capitalism is better. Seventeen percent (17%) are not sure. Support for capitalism has increased since April 2017, when 61% of voters said capitalism was better than socialism. Eighty-four percent (84%) of Republicans believe capitalism is a better system than socialism, a view shared by 46% of Democrats and 66% of voters not affiliated with either major party. Nearly a third of Democrats (31%) like socialism better, compared to 8% of Republicans and 14% of unaffiliated voters.

    Biden's job approval weakens slightly:

    • Strongly Approve: 30% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 49% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 49% (+1)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 31%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 41%
    • Total Approve: 49%
    • Total Disapprove: 49%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 33%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 50%
    • Total Disapprove: 48%

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 31%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 42% (+3)
    • Total Approve: 47% (-2)
    • Total Disapprove: 53% (+2)

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 30% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 42% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 47% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 53% (-1)

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 34%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 50%
    • Total Disapprove: 50%

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 35%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 31%
    • Total Approve: 55%
    • Total Disapprove: 44%

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 35%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 31% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 55% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 44% (+1)

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 38%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 27%
    • Total Approve: 58%
    • Total Disapprove: 40%
By Doug64
#15170336
@Pants-of-dog High enough for herd immunity.
#15170368
@Doug64

No. Some city in Brazil had something like 75% already infected and they still lost significant amounts of people in a later wave. Herd immunity is usually acquired when about 95% of the population are vaccinated or have antibodies from previous illness.
User avatar
By Drlee
#15170407
The US is not close to herd immunity (if it is even a possibility as that has not been firmly established) because....republican rhetoric created so many vaccine reluctant people. The immunity from the MRNA jabs appears to offer much better and much longer lasting immunity than having the disease does. YMMV.

As usual Doug has misinterpreted some science about which he has no clue.
By Doug64
#15171546
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-nine percent (39%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending April 29, 2021. This week’s finding remains the same as a week ago. Fifty-six percent (56%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, up one point from a week ago. A year ago at this time, 35% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 59% said it was on the wrong track.

    The Rasmussen Reports Immigration Index for the week of April 25-29, 2021 rose to 86.9, up from 83.7 two weeks earlier. The index is now as high as it’s been since early February; it reached a record low of 82.3 in late March. The Immigration Index has been under the baseline in every survey since Election Day last year. The index is still more than 18 points below where it was the week of October 22, indicating voters are looking for tighter immigration control from President Joe Biden’s administration.

    Thirty percent (30%) of Likely U.S. Voters say they are Very Confident in Biden’s ability to deal with terrorist threats to the United States. Another 16% say they are Somewhat Confident that Biden is able to deal with terrorist threats. Twelve percent (12%) are Not Very Confident and 40% are Not At All Confident in Biden’s ability to deal with terrorist threats. Fifty-eight percent (58%) of voters say domestic terrorism is a greater threat to the United States, while 32% consider foreign terrorism a greater threat. Ten percent (10%) are not sure. A near-majority (48%) believe the threat of terrorism has gone up since Biden became president, and only 14% think the terrorist threat has gone down. Twenty-nine percent (29%) believe the threat of terrorism has remained about the same since Biden became president. Voters are divided on whether the January 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol by some supporters of former President Donald Trump was a terrorist act, with 46% percent saying it was a terrorist act and 45% saying it was not.

    Fifty percent (50%) of American Adults believe America is winning the war against the coronavirus – up from 28% in January. Just 26% now say we are not winning the war against COVID-19, while 25% are not sure. Despite their increased confidence that we are beating the virus, 58% of Americans expect they’ll be required to wear masks in public places for at least another six months, including 25% who expect mask mandates to last 18 months or longer. A near-majority (49%) believe people who have been fully vaccinated against COVID-19 should continue wearing masks in public, and 54% say people should still wear a mask in public if they have already had the disease and recovered from it.

    Fifty-three percent (53%) of Likely U.S. Voters favor Biden’s plan that includes money for highways, bridges, trains, electric vehicles and other green energy projects. Thirty-five percent (35%) oppose the plan, while 12% are not sure. Senate Republicans have proposed their own infrastructure plan that would cost $568 billion, and 46% of voters favor the GOP plan, which is about $1.4 trillion cheaper than Biden’s plan. Thirty-seven percent (37%) oppose the Republican plan and 17% are not sure. Nearly two-thirds (65%) of voters say it is better for the country if President Biden and Democrats compromise with Republicans on infrastructure spending. Twenty-five percent (25%) say Biden and Democrats should try to pass their own infrastructure plan on a party-line vote. Ten percent are not sure.

    Twenty-eight percent (28%) of American Adults say the job market is better than it was a year ago. Thirty-nine percent (39%) say the job market it worse than a year ago, and 25% say it’s about the same as it was a year ago. The number of Americans who say the job market is worse is now higher than at any time since October 2012, when 41% said the job market was worse. In November 2019, 44% said the job market was better, compared to just 19% who said it was worse. Fifty-six percent (56%) now say they know someone who is out of work and looking for a job, up from 47% in July 2019. The number had been much higher when President Obama was in office, with more than 70% saying they knew someone out of work and looking for a job as recently as September 2014.

    Twenty-five percent (25%) of Likely U.S. Voters who regularly watch news on cable TV say they generally watch CNN. Forty-two percent (42%) of cable news viewers choose Fox News Channel and 21% say they generally watch MSNBC. Those numbers are a sharp reversal from four years ago, when Trump’s presidency proved a ratings gold mine for CNN. In a June 2017 survey, 47% of regular cable news viewers said they generally watched CNN, compared to 33% for Fox News and 16% for MSNBC. The shrinkage of CNN’s audience is part of an overall decline in interest in news since Joe Biden became president, according to an analysis by Thomas Moore of The Hill. Comparing the latest survey of Likely Voters to the June 2017 poll, the decline in cable news viewership is not among partisan Democrats or Republicans, but mainly voters unaffiliated with either major party.

    Fifty-nine percent (59%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe operators of social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter are politically biased in the decisions they make. Twenty-six percent (26%) disagree and believe social media companies edit their content in a fair and balanced way. Fifteen percent (15%) are not sure. Federal law known as Section 230 currently protects social media companies from legal liability for content posted by users on their platforms. Fifty-five percent (55%) of voters now favor proposals to lift these legal protections and make social media operators legally liable for posts on their sites. That’s up from 33% in our survey last May. Forty-eight percent (48%) of voters oppose Facebook’s decision to make Trump’s ban from the platform permanent. Forty-one percent (41%) are in favor of banning Trump from Facebook. Ten percent (10%) are not sure.

    Thirty-five percent (35%) of American Adults who live in gun-owning households say someone in the household has purchased a gun within the past year. Forty-six percent (46%) of Americans in gun-owning households say they have recently experienced difficulty finding ammunition for their firearms. U.S. gun sales hit record levels in March 2020 when the severity of the COVID-19 pandemic became apparent, and the gun-buying surge continued after last summer’s riots. Last October, 22% of gun-owning households said they’d purchased another gun since anti-police protests began after the death of George Floyd. A majority of Republicans (55%) now say they live in gun-owning households, compared to 35% of Democrats and 32% of those not affiliated with either major party.

    Biden's job approval strengthens slightly--it's basically just bouncing up and down slightly week from week:

    • Strongly Approve: 34% (+3)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 50% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 48% (-1)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 32% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 50% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 48% (-1)

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 33%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 50%
    • Total Disapprove: 48%

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 30% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 41% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 48% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 52% (-1)

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 30%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 41% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 48% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 52% (-1)

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 33% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 41% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 50%
    • Total Disapprove: 50%

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 35%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 31%
    • Total Approve: 56% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 44%

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 35%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 31%
    • Total Approve: 55%
    • Total Disapprove: 44%

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 38%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 28% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 58%
    • Total Disapprove: 41% (+1)
By Doug64
#15172896
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Forty-two percent (42%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending May 6, 2021. This week’s finding is up three point from a week ago. Fifty-two percent (52%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, down four points from a week ago. A year ago at this time, 35% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 57% said it was on the wrong track.

    Thirty-five percent (35%) of Likely U.S. Voters who regularly use social media are at least Somewhat Confident that social media can censor questionable content in a fair and unbiased way, including 14% who are Very Confident. Twenty-five percent (25%) are Not Very Confident in the fairness of social media censorship and 36% are Not At All Confident. The overall level of trust in social media censorship has increased since we asked this question in February, when 28% were at least Somewhat Confident in the fairness of such censorship. Much of that difference reflects higher confidence among Democratic voters. A majority (51%) of Democrats who regularly use social media are now at least Somewhat Confident that platforms can censor questionable content in a fair and unbiased way, compared to just 23% of Republicans and 27% of voters not affiliated with either major party. Democrats (21%) are more than twice as likely as Republicans (10%) or unaffiliated voters (9%) to say they are Very Confident in the fairness of social media censorship.

    Sixty-six percent (66%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe the current situation with migrants at the U.S.-Mexico border is a crisis. Twenty percent (20%) say it’s not a crisis, and 13% are not sure. Biden has blamed the Trump administration for current problems at the U.S.-Mexico border. However, 50% of voters say the nation’s current immigration problems are being caused more by the policies President Biden has put in place. Forty-one percent (41%) agree with Biden that current immigration problems are due to the policies of the Trump administration. As might be expected, partisanship influences opinions about this issue. Republicans (85%) are more likely than Democrats (49%) or voters not affiliated with either major party (67%) to say the current situation with migrants at the U.S.-Mexico border is a crisis. The partisan divide is even starker on the question of who is to blame for America’s current immigration problems. Seventy-seven percent (77%) of Republicans say the problems are being caused more by Biden’s policies, while 69% of Democrats believe current immigration problems are due to the policies of the Trump administration. Unaffiliated voters are more inclined to blame Biden (56%) than Trump (33%) for current immigration problems. Among voters who believe the current situation with migrants at the U.S.-Mexico border is a crisis, 69% say the nation’s immigration problems are being caused more by Biden’s policies. Conversely, among voters who say the current border situation is not a crisis, 74% blame Trump for America’s immigration problems.

    Sixty percent (60%) of American Adults believe that, generally speaking, Americans should be proud of the history of the United States. Only 22% believe Americans should be ashamed of the nation’s history. Eighteen percent (18%) are not sure. However, the belief that American history should be a source of pride has declined significantly since November 2019, when 73% said Americans should be proud of the history of the United States. Eighty percent (80%) of Republicans and 60% of those not affiliated with either major party now say America’s history is something to be proud of. However, only 45% of Democrats agree, while 34% of Democrats say Americans should be ashamed of their nation’s history. Only 11% of Republicans and 18% of unaffiliateds believe Americans should be ashamed of U.S. history.

    Seventy-six percent (76%) of American Adults are at least Somewhat Concerned about inflation, including 45% who are Very Concerned. Fourteen percent (14%) are Not Very Concerned about inflation and just two percent (2%) say they’re Not At All Concerned. Seventy-nine percent (79%) of Americans say they’re paying more for groceries than they were a year ago, but 13% say they’re not. Sixty-six percent (66%) say they expect the amount they spend for groceries to be higher a year from now. Only four percent (4%) expect to be spending less for groceries a year from now, and 21% expect to spend about the same.

    Forty-two percent (42%) of Likely U.S. Voters are at least Somewhat Confident in the ability of the federal government to protect against future attacks like the one that shut down the Colonial pipeline, including 15% who are Very Confident. Twenty-nine percent (29%) are Not Very Confident the government can protect against such attacks and 25% are Not At All Confident. Forty-seven percent (47%) of Likely Voters said they’ve experienced gasoline shortages or higher gasoline prices since the May 7 malware attack that temporarily shut down the Colonial Pipeline, which supplies petroleum to much of the Eastern U.S. Forty-one percent (41%) said they had not experienced shortages or higher prices for gasoline, and 12% were not sure. Some news reports indicate Russian hackers were involved in shutting down the Colonial Pipeline. Sixty-two percent (62%) of voters believe it is at least Somewhat Likely that the Russian government is responsible for this attack, including 29% who say it’s Very Likely. Fifteen percent (15%) say it’s Not Very Likely the Russian government was responsible for the attack on the Colonial Pipeline and seven percent (7%) say it’s Not At All Likely. Sixteen percent (16%) are not sure.

    Fifty-four percent (54%) of Likely U.S. Voters who say MSNBC is their favorite cable news outlet, and 53% of those who say CNN is their favorite, believe if global carbon-dioxide emissions continue to increase at a rate comparable to what occurred during the past decade, humans would become completely or nearly extinct within 100 years due to climate change. By contrast, only 25% of Fox News viewers believe climate change could make humans extinct within 100 years. When it comes to the amount of global warming that has already happened, the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says the Earth’s average surface temperature has increased by about 2.1°F (1.2°C) since the late 1800s. Thirty-seven percent (37%) of voters correctly answered that the range of measured global warming is between one degree and three degrees Fahrenheit. Fourteen percent (14%) underestimated (less than one degree), while 27% overestimated it as being between three and five degrees, 14% said it was between five degrees and 10 degrees, and eight percent (8%) believed the amount of global warming since the late 1800s was more than 10 degrees. Among voters who say Fox News is their favorite cable-news channel 41% answered correctly about the amount of measured global warming since the 1800s, as did 30% of MSNBC and CNN viewers. But while Fox News viewers were more likely to underestimate the amount of global warming, a majority of MSNBC and CNN viewers overestimated it. Sixty-eight percent (68%) of MSNBC viewers and 65% of CNN viewers believe global temperature has increased three degrees or more since the late 1800s, compared to 38% of Fox viewers who overestimated the amount of global warming. Thirty percent (30%) of MSNBC and CNN viewers believed temperatures have increased at least five degrees, compared to just 16% of Fox News viewers who believe the same.

    Fifty percent (50%) of Likely U.S. Voters who say MSNBC or CNN is their favorite cable news outlet believe more than 100 unarmed African Americans were fatally shot by police in 2020. By contrast, only 22% of Fox News viewers believe police shot more than 100 unarmed black people last year. Nearly a quarter of CNN viewers (24%) and almost one-in-five MSNBC viewers (19%) think cops fatally shot more than 500 unarmed black suspects last year, but only nine percent (9%) of Fox News viewers think so. Fox News viewers (60%) were about three times more likely than viewers of MSNBC (19%) or CNN (23%) to correctly estimate the number of unarmed black people shot and killed by police in 2020 as less than 50. Sixty percent (60%) of talk radio listeners also estimated the number correctly. About 1,500 homicides in the U.S. annually are committed with knives, while fewer than 500 are committed with rifles. However, 30% of Likely Voters think the annual number of homicides committed with rifles is more than 500, including 18% who believe more than 1,000 homicides a year are committed with rifles. Thirty percent (30%) of MSNBC viewers correctly estimated the number of homicides committed with rifles as between 100 and 500, as did 22% of CNN viewers and 19% of Fox News viewers. However, while 63% of Fox viewers underestimated the number of killings with rifles as less than 100, viewers of CNN and MSNBC were more likely to overestimate the number of homicides committed with rifles. Forty-three percent (43%) of CNN viewers and 40% of MSNBC viewers believe rifles are used in more than 500 homicides annually, compared to just 19% of Fox News viewers. Only 26% of talk radio listeners overestimated the number of homicides committed with rifles.

    Economic confidence rose to 123.7 in this month’s Rasmussen Reports Economic Index, up more than nine points from April, the third consecutive monthly increase. Enthusiasm about the economy surged under former President Trump, reaching as high as 147.8 in January 2020 before tumbling after the coronavirus lockdown threw Americans out of work and closed many businesses. By November, it had recovered to 126.4, but dropped sharply in the three months after President Biden was elected, falling to 97.8 in February before rebounding in March and April. Thirty-nine percent (39%) of American Adults rate the economy as good or excellent this month, up five points from last month and but still below the 42% mark in November. The number who rate the economy as poor has decreased to 22%, down five points from April. Thirty-six percent (36%) now think the economy is getting better, up five points from last month, and one point higher than in November. Thirty-nine percent (39%) expect a worsening economy, down six points points from last month, and four points lower than November. Twenty percent (21%) see things staying about the same, a number that has held mostly steady since January. There has been a remarkable reversal since President Biden was elected, as Democrats are now more bullish on the economy than Republicans. Fifty-two percent (52%) of Democrats view the economy as good or excellent, compared to 32% of Republicans and 33% of those not affiliated with either major party. GOP confidence has declined 42 points since November, when 74% of Republicans had a positive view of the economy, while Democrats’ confidence has risen 20 points from 32% in November. While 68% of Republicans before the election said they expected the economy will improve, only 21% feel that way now. Democrats are now more optimistic, with 55% saying they expect the economy to get better, an increase of 35 points since January. Twenty-eight percent (28%) of those unaffiliated with either major party now are optimistic that the economy will get better, up 12 points from January, and now five points higher than before the election.

    And Biden's job approval drops slightly again--though only on the weekly number, the monthly and term to date numbers not even twitching:

    • Strongly Approve: 32% (-2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 49% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 49% (+1)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 32%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 50%
    • Total Disapprove: 48%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 33%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 50%
    • Total Disapprove: 48%

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 28% (-2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 44% (+3)
    • Total Approve: 46% (-2)
    • Total Disapprove: 54% (+2)

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 30%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 42% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 48%
    • Total Disapprove: 52%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 33%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 41%
    • Total Approve: 49% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 51% (+1)

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 35%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 28% (-3)
    • Total Approve: 57% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 42% (-2)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 35%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 3% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 56% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 43% (-1)

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 38%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 28%
    • Total Approve: 58%
    • Total Disapprove: 41%
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