Key Rasmussen Polls - Page 69 - Politics Forum.org | PoFo

Wandering the information superhighway, he came upon the last refuge of civilization, PoFo, the only forum on the internet ...

Political issues and parties in the USA and Canada.

Moderator: PoFo North America Mods

Forum rules: No one line posts please.
By Doug64
#15173674
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-eight percent (38%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending May 13, 2021. This week’s finding is down four points from a week ago. Fifty-five percent (55%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, up three points from a week ago A year ago at this time, 35% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 58% said it was on the wrong track.

    The Rasmussen Reports Immigration Index for the week of May 9-13, 2021, rose to 88.1, up from 86.9 two weeks earlier. The index is now as high as it’s been since early February; it reached a record low of 82.3 in late March. The Immigration Index has been under the baseline in every survey since Election Day last year. The index is still more than 15 points below where it was the week of October 22, indicating voters are looking for tighter immigration control from President Joe Biden’s administration.

    Fifty-four percent (54%) of Likely U.S. Voters say the chance of a major war in the Middle East is now more likely than it was a year ago. Fourteen percent (14%) believe a major Middle East war is less likely than it was a year ago, and 27% say the chance of war is about the same. A majority of voters (51%) say America’s relationship with Israel is Very Important to U.S. national security. Another 32% say the U.S.-Israel relationship is Somewhat Important to our national security, while nine percent (9%) consider it Not Very Important and four percent (4%) say it’s Not At All Important. Forty-seven percent (47%) of voters say the Biden administration’s policy toward Israel is worse than the Trump administration’s Israel policy, while 25% believe the Biden administration’s Israel policy is better. Seventeen percent (17%) of voters say Biden’s policy toward Israel is about the same as Trump’s policy, and 11% are not sure.

    Sixteen percent (16%) of Likely U.S. Voters who say CNN is their favorite cable news outlet and 20% of those who say MSNBC is their favorite correctly estimated the U.S. national debt (currently more than $28 trillion) as being between $20 trillion and $30 trillion. By contrast, 35% of Fox News viewers, and 32% who say they get their news from talk radio, correctly estimated the size of the U.S. national debt. Viewers of CNN and MSNBC are more likely to dramatically underestimate the size of the national debt, as are voters who get their news from major broadcast networks (NBC, ABC and CBS). There were similar effects on questions about health insurance and income tax rates, with viewers of liberal media more likely to get the facts wrong than voters who don’t watch TV news at all. Overall, 28% of Likely Voters correctly estimated the U.S. national debt as being between $20 trillion and $30 trillion. Sixteen percent (16%) overestimated the national debt as more than $30 trillion, while a majority (56%) underestimated the national debt as less than $20 trillion. Among cable news viewers, voters who said CNN is their favorite were most likely (29%) to dramatically underestimate the national debt as being less than $5 trillion. Twenty-five percent (25%) of MSNBC viewers made the same mistake, as did 19% of voters who say Fox News is their favorite and 18% of those who watch “another” cable network and 19% of those who don’t watch cable news. Among broadcast news viewers, 32% of voters who say CBS is their favorite dramatically underestimate the U.S. national debt as being less than $5 trillion, as do 27% of NBC viewers and 26% of ABC viewers. By contrast, the national debt is underestimated as less than $5 trillion by only 14% of voters who say they don’t watch broadcast network news, and 19% of those who say they get their news primarily from talk radio.

    Eighty-five percent (85%) of American Adults are at least Somewhat Concerned about the safety of the nation’s computer infrastructure from cyberattack, including 59% who are Very Concerned. Only 11% are Not Very Concerned or Not At All Concerned. Those numbers are just slightly changed from four years ago, when 90% were at least Somewhat Concerned about cyberattacks, with 51% Very Concerned. Only 19% now believe America’s computer infrastructure can ever be made completely safe from cyberattack. Nearly half (48%) say that level of safety is not possible. About one-third (33%) are not sure. In May 2017, 68% believed it was impossible to make U.S. computer infrastructure totally safe from cyberattack. This is comparable to attitudes about avoiding mass shooting incidents. Following two mass shootings in Atlanta, Georgia, and Boulder, Colorado, in March, only 23% of Likely Voters believed such incidents can be completely prevented.

    Fifty-nine percent (59%) of American Adults believe it is at least Somewhat Likely that most jobs in America will be done by robots or computers 25 years from now, including 21% who say it’s Very Likely. Twenty-six percent (26%) think it’s Not Very Likely most jobs will be done by robots and six percent (6%) say it’s Not At All Likely. The percentage who believe it’s at least Somewhat Likely most jobs in America will be done by robots or computers within 25 years has decreased slightly from 64% in June 2018. While most Americans believe robots could do most work in the future, they think their own jobs are safe from the robot takeover. Only 13% say their job could be done by a robot, while 72% say a robot couldn’t do their job, but 16% are not sure. Those numbers have changed only slightly since June 2018, when 75% believed their job couldn’t be done by a robot.

    Sixty-four percent (64%) of American Adults approve the CDC’s decision that people fully vaccinated against COVID-19 don't need to wear masks or social distance anymore, including 29% who Strongly Approve. Twenty-seven percent (27%) disapprove of the new CDC guidance, including 10% who Strongly Disapprove. Republicans (53%) are much more likely than Democrats (24%) or those not affiliated with either major party (32%) to say they Strongly Approve of the CDC’s decision to end the mask mandate for those fully vaccinated against COVID-19. But while Republicans are more likely to approve of the CDC’s recommendation to end mask mandates for those already vaccinated, Democrats are actually more likely to say they’ve gotten the COVID-19 vaccine. Fifty-eight percent (58%) of American Adults say they have received a COVID-19 vaccination – a number basically unchanged since late April. Seventy-one percent (71%) of Democrats now say they’ve been vaccinated against COVID-19, compared to 51% of Republicans and 52% of the unaffiliated.

    Fifty-two percent (52%) of Conservative Likely U.S. Voters who regularly watch TV news most often watch Fox News. Seventeen percent (17%) of conservative news viewers watch Newsmax most often and nine percent (9%) say they watch OAN most often. Twenty percent (20%) of conservative TV news viewers prefer “some other network.” After the controversy over the 2020 presidential election results, some supporters of former President Trump were angered by how Fox News covered the story, and Nielsen ratings indicated a surge of viewers for Newsmax. Thirty-eight percent (38%) of conservative TV news viewers say they’ve changed their favorite network in the past year, while 52% say their preference hasn’t changed. Among those who most often watch Newsmax, 63% say their favorite network has changed in the past year, and 53% of the OAN audience have also changed their favorite network in the past year.

    Fifty-five percent (55%) of Likely U.S. Voters prefer a smaller government with fewer services and lower taxes. Thirty-seven percent (37%) disagree and prefer a more active government with more services and higher taxes. Support for smaller government has risen slightly since last November, when 52% of voters said they preferred a smaller government with fewer services and lower taxes. Support for smaller government has ranged from 52% to 70% in regular surveying since 2006. More than two-thirds of voters (68%) say government does not spend taxpayer money wisely and carefully. Only 18% believe government does spend taxpayer money wisely and carefully. Fourteen percent (14%) are not sure.

    And Biden's job approval picks up slightly again--though again only on the weekly number, the monthly and term to date numbers not even twitching. Interestingly, his Strong Approve number moved in the opposite direction as his Total Approve, that doesn't usually happen:

    • Strongly Approve: 31% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 51% (+2)
    • Total Disapprove: 47% (-2)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 32%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 50%
    • Total Disapprove: 48%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 33%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 50%
    • Total Disapprove: 48%

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 27% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 46% (+2)
    • Total Approve: 44% (-2)
    • Total Disapprove: 56% (+2)

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 29% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 46% (-2)
    • Total Disapprove: 54% (+2)

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 33%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 41%
    • Total Approve: 49%
    • Total Disapprove: 51%

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 35%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 29% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 57%
    • Total Disapprove: 42%

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 35%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 30%
    • Total Approve: 56%
    • Total Disapprove: 43%

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 37% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 28%
    • Total Approve: 58%
    • Total Disapprove: 41%
By Doug64
#15174730
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-nine percent (39%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending May 20, 2021. This week’s finding is up one point from a week ago. Fifty-four percent (54%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, down one point from a week ago. A year ago at this time, 34% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 60% said it was on the wrong track.

    Fifty-nine percent (59%) of American Adults believe it will be difficult for recent college graduates to find a job in the current economy, including 19% who say it will be Very Difficult. Those numbers are down from 82% and 43%, respectively, last April, when many businesses were under lockdown orders. Twenty-four percent (24%) say it won’t be very difficult for this year’s college graduates to find a job, and nine percent (9%) say it won’t be difficult at all. Only 37% of Americans believe most college graduates have the skills needed to enter the workforce, a slight improvement from 34% a year ago. Forty percent (40%) disagree and say most graduates don’t have the necessary skills, while 23% are not sure. Still, 70% believe a college degree is important in terms of finding a job in today’s economy, although only 30% think it’s Very Important. This overall finding is down from 75% last year and is a new low. Twenty percent (23%) now rate a college degree Not Very or Not At All Important for job seekers.

    Fifty-eight percent (58%) of Likely U.S. Voters approve congressional plans to create a commission, like the one that investigated the 9/11 terrorist attacks, to investigate the January 6 riot. That includes 42% who Strongly Approve of the commission proposal. Thirty-five percent (37%) disapprove of the riot commission plan, including 23% who Strongly Disapprove. The House last week voted to create a commission to investigate the Capitol riot, a plan opposed by most Republicans in Congress, including Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell. A majority of likely Republican voters (57%) disapprove of the riot commission, including 40% who Strongly Disapprove. Seventy-eight percent (78%) of likely Democratic voters approve of plans for a commission to investigate the Capitol riot, as do 56% of likely voters not affiliated with either major party.

    Twenty-seven percent (27%) of American Adults think most high school graduates have the skills needed to enter the workforce. Fifty-five percent (55%) say they do not have those skills and 19% are not sure. Likewise, only 28% believe most high school graduates have the skills needed for college. Forty-nine percent (59%) say they don’t. Twenty-three percent (23%) are undecided. Pessimistic beliefs about the preparedness of high school graduates are not surprising, considering that only 29% rate the performance of public schools in America today as good or excellent, while (34%) say they do a poor job. These results are little changed from two years ago. Majorities have expressed a negative view of the skills of new high school graduates in surveys dating back to 2012.

    Fifty-four percent (54%) of Likely U.S. Voters have a favorable opinion of Fauci, including 34% who have a Very Favorable view of the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. That’s down from 68% and 42%, respectively, in May last year. Thirty-nine percent (39%) of voters now have an unfavorable opinion of Fauci, including 26% who have a Very Unfavorable view of him. Forty percent (40%) of voters say that over the past year they have become less confident in Fauci's COVID-19 recommendations. Twenty-eight percent (28%) say they are now more confident in Fauci’s recommendations than they were a year ago, while 28% say their level of confidence is unchanged. Nearly two-thirds of voters (65%) believe political considerations have influenced Fauci's decisions and public statements about the COVID-19 pandemic, including 40% who think political considerations have had a lot of influence on him. Only 11% believe Fauci’s decisions and statements about the pandemic haven’t been influenced at all by political considerations.

    Sixty-eight percent (68%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe it is likely that the COVID-19 virus originated in a Chinese laboratory, including 43% who think it’s Very Likely. Only 16% of voters don’t think it’s likely the virus came from a Chinese lab, while another 16% are not sure. The so-called “lab leak hypothesis,” once derided as a conspiracy theory, has gained increased support in recent weeks as more evidence points toward China’s Wuhan Institute of Virology as the source of COVID-19. Eighty-two percent (82%) say it is important for federal authorities to investigate the origins of the COVID-19 virus, including 53% who say such an investigation is Very Important. Questions about the origin of COVID-19 have not diminished public approval for President Joe Biden’s handling of the pandemic. Fifty-nine percent (59%) of likely voters now approve of how Biden has handled COVID-19, up from 53% two months ago.

    Forty-five percent (45%) of American Adults consider Memorial Day, when we honor those who died while serving in the military, one of our nation’s most important holidays. Just eight percent (8%) say it’s one of America’s least important holidays, while 41% place it somewhere in between. Americans have consistently ranked Memorial Day behind Christmas and the Fourth of July as among the nation’s most important holidays. For military families, Memorial Day has greater significance. Among those who say they or a close family member have served in the U.S. armed forces, 52% consider Memorial Day one of our nation’s most important holidays, compared to 35% of those who say they or their family members haven’t served in the military. Sixty-eight percent (68%) of American Adults say Memorial Day marks the unofficial start of summer. Eighteen percent (18%) disagree and 14% are not sure.

    Sixty-five percent (65%) of Likely U.S. Voters say the problem of violent crime in America is getting worse. Only 10% say the violent crime problem is getting better, while 22% think it is staying about the same. Forty-six percent (46%) of voters say they are confident in President Biden’s ability to deal with the problem of violent crime in America, including 20% who are Very Confident. However, 50% are not confident in Biden’s ability to deal with the crime problem, including 35% who are Not At All Confident. Homicide and other violent crimes have soared since the Black Lives Matters protests over George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis last May. Awareness of the worsening crime problem now transcends political categories. Seventy-two percent (72%) of Republicans, 59% of Democrats and 65% of voters not affiliated with either major party say the problem of violent crime in America is getting worse.

    Biden's job approval has the best week he's had since he was elected:

    • Strongly Approve: 31%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 35% (-5)
    • Total Approve: 54% (+3)
    • Total Disapprove: 44% (-3)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 32%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 39% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 51% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 47% (-1)

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 33%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 50%
    • Total Disapprove: 48%

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 30% (+3)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43% (-3)
    • Total Approve: 46% (+2)
    • Total Disapprove: 54% (-2)

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 29%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 44% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 46%
    • Total Disapprove: 54%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 33%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 41%
    • Total Approve: 49%
    • Total Disapprove: 51%

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 34% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 29%
    • Total Approve: 56% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 42%

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 35%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 30%
    • Total Approve: 56%
    • Total Disapprove: 43%

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 37%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 28%
    • Total Approve: 58%
    • Total Disapprove: 41%
By Doug64
#15175853
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Forty-two percent (42%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending May 27, 2021. This week’s finding is up three points from a week ago. Fifty-one percent (51%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, down three points from a week ago. A year ago at this time, 33% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 62% said it was on the wrong track.

    The Rasmussen Reports Immigration Index for the week of May 23-27, 2021, rose to 89.9, up from 88.1 two weeks earlier. The index is now as high as it’s been since late January; it reached a record low of 82.3 in late March. The Immigration Index has been under the baseline in every survey since Election Day last year. The index is still more than 12 points below where it was the week of October 22, indicating voters are looking for tighter immigration control from President Joe Biden’s administration.

    Thirty-two percent (32%) of Likely U.S. Voters think, compared to most recent presidents, President Biden is a stronger commander in chief for the military. Forty-three percent (43%) believe Biden is a weaker commander in chief than most recent presidents. Eighteen percent (18%) say Biden is about the same as most recent presidents as a military leader. Three years ago, 40% of voters, and a majority of those with military experience, said President Donald Trump was a stronger commander-in-chief for the military than most recent presidents. Most Democrats (55%) now believe Biden is a stronger commander in chief, but that belief is shared by only 12% of Republicans and 25% of voters not affiliated with either major party. Seventy-five percent (75%) of GOP voters think Biden is a weaker commander in chief compared to most recent presidents, as do 13% of Democrats and 44% of unaffiliated voters.

    Twenty-eight percent (28%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe race relations in the United States have gotten better since Biden’s election. Thirty-nine percent (39%) believe race relations have gotten worse, while 28% say race relations are about the same. Just 22% of voters say life for young black Americans gotten better since Biden was elected president, while 29% believe life has gotten worse for young black people. Thirty-eight percent (38%) think life for young black Americans is about the same as it was before Biden’s election. Eleven percent (11%) are not sure. While black voters have a higher opinion of Biden than do others, still only 34% of black voters believe U.S. race relations have gotten better since Biden was elected, and just 25% of black voters say life has gotten better for young black Americans since Biden’s election.

    Fifteen percent (15%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe America’s relations with Israel have gotten better since Biden became president. Forty-five percent (45%) think the U.S.-Israel relationship has gotten worse, while 33% say America’s relationship with Israel is about the same since Biden took office. Voters rate Biden worse than former President Trump on U.S.-Israel relations. In April 2018, 38% of voters said America’s relations with Israel had gotten better since Trump took office, and only 20% said the U.S.-Israel relationship was worse with Trump in the White House. American voters have mixed opinions about the effort by Netanyahu’s opponents to oust him as Israel’s Prime Minister. Thirty-one percent (31%) of Likely Voters say the end of Netanyahu’s tenure would be a good development for Israel, while 32% said it would be a bad development. Sixteen percent (16%) believe Netanyahu’s ouster would make no difference and 20% are not sure.

    The president earned a monthly job approval of 52% in May, up three points from April. Forty-six percent (46%) disapproved of his job performance in May, down three points from 49% in April. Donald Trump’s monthly approval ran from a high of 51% in February 2017, his first full month in the White House, to a low of 42% in August 2017. This past December, his final full month in office, Trump earned a monthly job approval of 47%. Fifty-one percent (51%) disapproved.

    Twenty-eight percent (28%) of Likely Republican Voters believe the attitudes of GOP voters remain about the same as those of the party’s leaders. Fifty percent (50%) say Republican voters are becoming more conservative than the GOP leadership, while 15% think these voters are becoming more liberal. By comparison, 35% of Likely Democratic Voters continue to share attitudes that are about the same as the party’s leadership. But 43% say Democratic voters are becoming more liberal than their leaders, while 17% believe these voters are turning more conservative. Views of Democratic voters about their party leadership haven’t changed much from last June, but the percentage of GOP voters who say they’re more conservative than Republican leaders has increased 14 points in a year.

    Forty-four percent (44%) of Likely U.S. Voters agree with Biden that the January 6 Capitol riot was “the worst attack on our democracy since the Civil War.” Forty-one percent (41%) disagree and 14% say they’re not sure. Last summer’s disturbances in U.S. cities in the wake of George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis were repeatedly called “mostly peaceful protests” by the news media, but only 35% of voters agree with that description and 52% say they were riots. Another 13% were not sure. Biden was widely criticized for calling the Capitol riot “the worst attack on our democracy since the Civil War” in his April 28 speech to a joint session of Congress. However, 66% of Democratic voters agree with Biden’s claim, as do 26% of Republicans and 38% of voters not affiliated with either major party. Fifty-nine percent (59%) of GOP voters, 20% of Democrats and 48% of unaffiliated voters disagree with Biden’s rhetoric.

    Seventy percent (70%) of American Adults say they use an online streaming service like Netflix or Hulu to watch TV and movies. That’s up from 56% four years ago. Twenty-six percent (26%) say they don’t use streaming services. The popularity of streaming services has helped drive the phenomenon “cord-cutting,” with people cancelling cable TV subscriptions in favor of online content. Less than half (48%) of Americans now say they have cable TV, down from 57% four years ago. Fifteen percent (15%) now say they have satellite TV, 11% still get TV through a regular household antenna and 21% say “something else” is their TV source. However, Americans report they’re watching TV less often now. Forty-eight percent (48%) watch TV every day or nearly every day, down from 56% four years ago. The number who say they rarely or never watch TV has increased to 10% (up from 7% in June 2017) and those who watch only occasionally has risen to 14%, up from 10% four years ago.


    And Biden's job approval bump was too good to last. At least he isn't underwater again (yet) and his monthly and to-date numbers are holding steady:

    • Strongly Approve: 32% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 39% (+4)
    • Total Approve: 51% (-3)
    • Total Disapprove: 47% (+3)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 32%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 39%
    • Total Approve: 51%
    • Total Disapprove: 47%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 33%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 50%
    • Total Disapprove: 48%

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 28% (-2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 46% (+3)
    • Total Approve: 44% (-2)
    • Total Disapprove: 56% (+2)

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 28% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 45% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 45% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 55% (+1)

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 32% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 41%
    • Total Approve: 49%
    • Total Disapprove: 51%

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 35% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 28% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 57% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 42%

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 35%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 29% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 57% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 42% (-1)

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 37%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 28%
    • Total Approve: 58%
    • Total Disapprove: 41%
By Doug64
#15176673
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-seven percent (37%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending June 3, 2021. This week’s finding is down five points from a week ago. Fifty-six percent (56%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, up five points from a week ago. A year ago at this time, 40% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 54% said it was on the wrong track.

    Forty-seven percent (47%) of American Adults rate the response of their state government to the COVID-19 pandemic since it began as good or excellent. By comparison, only 38% rate the federal government’s response to the pandemic as good or excellent. Twenty-seven percent (27%) rate the federal government’s response to the pandemic as poor, compared to 22% who rate their state government’s COVID-19 response as poor. Sixty-three percent (63%) say they have received a COVID-19 vaccine, and those who have been vaccinated against the virus have a higher opinion of both state and federal responses to the pandemic than do the unvaccinated. Among those who have gotten the COVID-19 vaccine, 58% rate their state government’s response to the pandemic as good or excellent and 43% rate the federal government’s COVID-19 response good or excellent. Among the unvaccinated, however, only 29% rate their state government’s COVID-19 response good or excellent and 31% rate the federal pandemic response good or excellent.

    Forty percent (40%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe Fauci has told the truth about U.S. government funding for so-called “gain-of-function” virus research. Forty-six percent (46%) of voters believe Fauci has not told the truth about U.S. funding of such research, and 15% are not sure. Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul last week said newly released emails show Fauci was aware that American taxpayer dollars were funding gain-of-function research at the Wuhan Institute of Virology, suspected as the source of the COVID-19 virus. Fauci has defined gain-of-function research as “taking a virus that could infect humans and making it either more transmissible and/or pathogenic for humans.” Sixty-one percent (61%) of voters say they have been following recent news about gain-of-function research at least Somewhat Closely, including 39% who say they’ve followed such reports Very Closely. Among those who say they’ve followed recent news Very Closely, 59% don’t believe Dr. Anthony Fauci has told the truth about U.S. government funding for gain-of-function virus research.

    Fifty-seven percent (57%) of American Adults consider themselves to be a religious person, while just 32% disagree. Another 11% are undecided. Only 43% of adults under 40 say they view themselves as religious, compared to 65% of middle-aged adults and 66% of senior citizens. Forty-four percent (44%) of younger adults say they are not religious. Those numbers represent a decline in religious belief from June 2016, when 62% of American Adults, including 57% of those under 40, considered themselves to be a religious person. Fifty-eight percent (58%) now say they believe in life after death, a decline from 62% in June 2017. This decline is similarly larger among younger Americans. Fifty-four percent (54%) of Americans under 40 say they believe in the afterlife, compared to 60% of those ages 40-64 and 61% of those 65 and older.

    Sixty-nine percent (69%) of Likely Republican Voters have a favorable impression of Pence, including 35% whose impression is Very Favorable. Twenty-eight percent (28%) of GOP voters view Pence unfavorably, including 14% who have a Very Unfavorable impression of the former VP. When asked whether the Republican Party should be more like Pence or more like former President Trump, however, 64% of GOP voters want their party to be more like Trump and just 24% of Republicans want their party to be more like Pence. Pence made headlines last week at a Republican dinner in New Hampshire when he said that he and Trump may never “see eye to eye” about the January 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol. Among all Likely Voters, 49% have a favorable impression of Pence, including 23% who have a Very Favorable view of him. Forty-six percent (46%) of voters view Pence unfavorably, including 27% who have a Very Unfavorable impression of him.

    Nineteen percent (19%) of American Adults say they or someone they know have seen an unidentified flying object (UFO). Sixty-seven percent (67%) say no one they know has seen a UFO, while 13% are not sure. Sixty-three percent (63%) think it is likely intelligent life exists on other planets, including 38% who believe it’s Very Likely. Twenty-four percent say it’s not likely intelligent life exists on other planets and 13% say they’re not sure. A U.S. intelligence community report on UFOs, due to be published later this month, reportedly found no evidence that mysterious objects seen by military pilots are from outer space, “but they can’t rule out the possibility,” either. Only 17% of Americans believe UFOs pose a national security threat to the United States. Forty-seven percent (47%) don’t think UFOs are a national security threat and 36% are not sure. The number of Americans who regard UFOs as a national security threat has increased since June 2019, when just 12% believed the mysterious objects posed a threat. More Democrats (71%) than Republicans or those not affiliated with either major party (59%) now believe intelligent life likely exists on other planets. However, Republicans (22%) are more likely than Democrats (16%) or the unaffiliated (20%) to say they or someone they know has seen a UFO. More men (71%) than women (55%) believe intelligent life likely exists on other planets, and those under 40 are more likely to believe than older Americans. When it comes to space invaders, apparently seeing is believing. Sixty-four percent (64%) of those who say they or someone they know has seen a UFO believe it is Very Likely intelligent life exists on other planets. Those who say they or someone they know has seen a UFO are more than twice as likely to say UFOs pose a national security threat, compared to those who say no one they know has never seen a UFO.

    Forty-four percent (44%) of Likely U.S. Voters agree with Obama’s recent statement that “certain right wing media venues … [are] stoking the fear and resentment of a white population that is witnessing a changing America and seeing demographic changes.” Thirty-two percent (32%) of voters disagree with that statement and 24% say they’re not sure. Obama made the remarks about “right wing media” stoking racial fear during an interview this week with CNN’s Anderson Cooper. Only 29% of voters believe recent racial and ethnic changes in the U.S. population made America a better country, while 35% say recent demographic changes have made the country worse. Twenty-three percent (23%) say demographic changes haven’t made much difference and 13% are not sure. Just 33% of voters say Obama made race relations in America better during his eight years as president. Forty-one percent (41%) say Obama made U.S. race relations worse, while 23% say his presidency didn’t make much difference in race relations.

    Eighty-six percent (86%) of American Adults believe it is important for young people to have jobs during the summer when they are out of school, including 56% who say it’s Very Important. Only nine percent (9%) don’t think summer jobs for young people are important. Forty-nine percent (49%) don’t believe it will be very difficult for young people to find summer jobs in the current economy, including 17% who expect it will be Not At All Difficult for teenagers to find work. Forty-seven percent (47%) of American Adults think young people will find it at least Somewhat Difficult to get a summer job, but only 19% think it will be Very Difficult. The number who think young people will have difficulty finding summer work is slightly up from 2018, but much lower than during Barack Obama’s presidency, when the number reached as high as 80%.

    Economic confidence fell to 118.8 in this month’s Rasmussen Reports Economic Index, down nearly five points from May, the first decline following three consecutive months of rising confidence. Enthusiasm about the economy surged under former President Trump, reaching as high as 147.8 in January 2020 before tumbling after the coronavirus lockdown threw Americans out of work and closed many businesses. By November, it had recovered to 126.4, but dropped sharply in the three months after President Biden was elected, falling to 97.8 in February before beginning a three-month rebound in March. Thirty-eight percent (38%) of American Adults rate the economy as good or excellent this month, down one point from last month and four points below the 42% mark in November. The number who rate the economy as poor increase decreased to 26%, up four points from May. Thirty-four percent (34%) now think the economy is getting better, down two points from last month. Forty-four percent (44%) expect a worsening economy, up five points from last month, but still 12 points lower than in February. Fifteen percent (15%) now see things staying about the same, down six points from last month. There has been a remarkable reversal since President Biden was elected, as Democrats are now more bullish on the economy than Republicans. Fifty-one percent (51%) of Democrats view the economy as good or excellent, compared to 27% of Republicans and 38% of those not affiliated with either major party. GOP confidence has declined 47 points since November, when 74% of Republicans had a positive view of the economy, while Democrats’ confidence has risen 19 points from 32% in November. While 68% of Republicans before the election said they expected the economy will improve, only 20% feel that way now. Democrats are now more optimistic, with 54% saying they expect the economy to get better, an increase of 34 points since January. Twenty-eight percent (27%) of those unaffiliated with either major party now are optimistic that the economy will get better, up 11 points from January, and now four points higher than before the election.

    And Biden's job approval continues to slide. But he still isn't underwater again (yet) and his monthly and to-date numbers are mostly holding steady:

    • Strongly Approve: 31% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 41% (+2)
    • Total Approve: 50% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 48% (+1)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 31% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 39%
    • Total Approve: 51%
    • Total Disapprove: 47%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 32% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 50%
    • Total Disapprove: 48%

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 28%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 44% (-2)
    • Total Approve: 46% (+2)
    • Total Disapprove: 54% (-2)

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 28%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 45%
    • Total Approve: 45%
    • Total Disapprove: 55%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 32%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 42% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 48% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 51%

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 36% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 31% (+3)
    • Total Approve: 55% (-2)
    • Total Disapprove: 44% (+2)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 35%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 29%
    • Total Approve: 56% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 43% (+1)

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 37%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 28%
    • Total Approve: 58%
    • Total Disapprove: 41%
By Doug64
#15177407
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-eight percent (38%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending June 10, 2021. This week’s finding is up one point from a week ago. Fifty-five percent (55%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, down one point from a week ago. A year ago at this time, 25% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 68% said it was on the wrong track.

    The Rasmussen Reports Immigration Index for the week of June 6-10, 2021, rose to 90.9, up from 89.9 two weeks earlier. The index is now as high as it’s been since late January; it reached a record low of 82.3 in late March. The Immigration Index has been under the baseline in every survey since Election Day last year. The index is still more than 10 points below where it was the week of October 22, indicating voters are looking for tighter immigration control from President Joe Biden’s administration.

    Twenty-nine percent (29%) of Likely U.S. Voters agree with Biden’s statement that “the greatest threat facing America.” Fifty-four percent (54%) disagree with Biden’s claim about global warming and 17% are not sure. In a speech last week to U.S. troops stationed in England, Biden said that, after he was elected vice president in 2008, the Joint Chiefs of Staff warned him and President Barack Obama that global warming was “the greatest threat facing America.” Not even a majority of Democratic voters agree with Biden’s assessment. Forty-two percent (42%) of Democrats believe global warming is “the greatest threat facing America,” while 33% don’t believe it and 25% are not sure. Majorities of both Republicans (76%) and voters not affiliated with either major party (56%) don’t think global warming is “the greatest threat facing America.”

    Twenty-four percent (24%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe most of the news media report fairly and accurately about the problem of crime in America. Sixty percent (60%) say the media don’t report fairly and accurately about crime, and 15% are not sure. The recent increase in violent crime prompted Attorney General Merrick Garland last month to announce a federal effort to combat the problem nationwide. Most voters distrust the news media’s reporting on crime, but are divided as to whether the media are exaggerating or underplaying the amount of crime. Thirty-eight percent (38%) say the media tend to underplay the amount of violent crime, while 33% believe the media exaggerate the amount of violent crime, and 20% think the media coverage is about right.

    Sixty-one percent (61%) of Likely U.S. Voters disagree with Omar’s remarks comparing the United States to Hamas and the Taliban, saying America has committed “crimes against humanity” and “unthinkable atrocities.” Twenty-four percent (24%) of voters agree with Omar’s comparison and 15% are not sure. Omar’s comments last week prompted harsh criticism, with 12 Jewish Democrats in the House condemning her remarks and a group of congressional Republicans introducing a censure resolution against Omar and three other Democratic members of the so-called “Squad.” Fifty percent (50%) of voters say they would support censuring Omar for her comments, while 35% would not support censure and 15% are not sure.

    Fifty-seven percent (57%) of Likely Democratic Voters believe the current national leadership of the Democratic Party is representative of most Democrats, while 32% think their party needs to find new leaders. By contrast, only 46% of Likely Republican Voters believe the GOP’s current national leadership is representative of most Republicans, and 42% think their party needs new leaders. Among all Likely Voters, 49% believe Democrats need new leadership and 57% think Republicans need new leaders. Having President Joe Biden in the White House has apparently made a big difference for Democrats. Four years ago, with President Donald Trump in office, 58% of Democrats said their party needed new leaders. But even winning the White House didn’t satisfy many Republican voters, with 45% of them saying in June 2017 their party needed new leadership.

    Forty-three percent (43%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe teaching Critical Race Theory in public schools will make race relations worse in America. Only 24% think teaching CRT will make race relations better, while 17% think it will not make much difference and 16% are not sure. Manhattan Institute scholar Christopher Rufo has described Critical Race Theory as “built on the intellectual framework of identity-based Marxism.” Parents in many communities have challenged local school boards over plans to teach CRT in classrooms. Sixty-seven percent (67%) of Republican voters believe teaching Critical Race Theory in public schools will make race relations worse in America, as do 18% of Democrats and 48% of voters unaffiliated with either major party. Forty-three percent (43%) of Democrats think teaching CRT in public schools will make race relations better, but only 11% of Republicans and 13% of unaffiliated voters agree.

    Fifty-eight percent (58%) of American Adults are concerned that TikTok could pose a risk to the personal data privacy of users, including 31% who are Very Concerned. Nineteen percent (19%) are Not Very Concerned about TikTok’s privacy risk, 11% are Not Concerned At All and 12% are not sure. Forty-seven percent (47%) of Americans 18 or older say they have watched videos on TikTok, but 48% have not. Last week, President Joe Biden signed an executive order reversing former President Donald Trump’s ban on TikTok, which had been prompted by TikTok’s Chinese ownership and concerns that the app could violate user privacy.

    Sixty-three percent (63%) of American Adults believe being a father the most important role for a man to fill in today’s world. Nineteen percent (19%) disagree and 17% are not sure. Eighty-six percent (86%) believe it is important for children to grow up in a home with both of their parents, including 61% who say it’s Very Important. Fewer than 10% think two-parent homes are not important for children. Americans value fatherhood more than they value Father’s Day. Twenty-one percent (21%) consider Father’s Day one of our nation’s most important holidays, up from 16% in 2018, while 20% consider it one of the least important. A majority (52%) see it as somewhere in between. Thirty-one percent (31%) consider Mother’s Day one of our most important holidays, but Christmas continues to be the most important holiday in the eyes of Americans.

    And Biden's job approval continues to slide (a little). But he still isn't underwater again (yet) and his monthly and to-date numbers are still holding steady:

    • Strongly Approve: 30% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 50%
    • Total Disapprove: 49% (+1)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 31%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 39%
    • Total Approve: 51%
    • Total Disapprove: 47%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 32%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 50%
    • Total Disapprove: 48%

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 30% (+2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 44%
    • Total Approve: 46%
    • Total Disapprove: 54%

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 29% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 45%
    • Total Approve: 45%
    • Total Disapprove: 55%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 32%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 42%
    • Total Approve: 48%
    • Total Disapprove: 52% (+1)

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 35% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 32% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 55%
    • Total Disapprove: 44%

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 35%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 30% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 56%
    • Total Disapprove: 43%

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 37%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 28%
    • Total Approve: 57% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 41%
User avatar
By Drlee
#15177500
Biden is not leading forcefully enough. He is waffling on the wall and taking a pass on immigration. He lucked out in the SCOTUS this week. The poll numbers show missed opportunity after missed opportunity. Until he takes on the filibuster he is going to continue to slide. But these polls and other more objective polls continuously show that democrats can't rally their big tent. They are simply not good a winning political battles. They are frequently put in office by a public eager for change and that public is just as frequently disappointed.
By Doug64
#15177704
@late, Trump got above water with likely voters on a regular basis. It rarely lasted so long as a week, but it did happen.

@Drlee, the Democrats' problem is that most causes near and dear to their elites (and so the ones that fund them) simply can't get much support from Independents. Republicans tend to have a similar problem, but not to the same extent--on issue after issue, anywhere from a plurality to an outright majority of Independents side with Republicans. A good example is Critical Race Theory--a plurality of 43% of Democrats think teaching CRT in schools would make race relations better with 20% thinking it won't make much of a difference, but a plurality of 48% of Independents agree with 67% of Republicans that CRT in schools will make race relations worse, a combined total of 59%. The result is an overall 43% plurality that believe CRT will make things worse, versus 41% that believe it'll make things better or not make a difference.
By late
#15177708
Doug64 wrote:[usermention=41202]

@late[/usermention], Trump got above water with likely voters on a regular basis. It rarely lasted so long as a week, but it did happen.



Not really interested in Rasmussen fantasy polls.

Image

Image

Image

https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/white-house/presidential-approval-poll-tracker-n1102776

https://projects.fivethirtyeight.com/trump-approval-ratings/









https://projects.fivethirtyeight.com/tr ... l-ratings/
User avatar
By Drlee
#15177722
A good example is Critical Race Theory--a plurality of 43% of Democrats think teaching CRT in schools would make race relations better with 20% thinking it won't make much of a difference, but a plurality of 48% of Independents agree with 67% of Republicans that CRT in schools will make race relations worse, a combined total of 59%. The result is an overall 43% plurality that believe CRT will make things worse, versus 41% that believe it'll make things better or not make a difference.


That is a good example and, just for the record, I agree that CRT will make thing much worse.
By Doug64
#15177734
@late, if Rasmussen's polls are "fantasy polls," then why does 538 include them in the list of polls they use? And how have those other pollsters' performance compare to Rasmussen's? I can't find any of them on RCP's list of polls. Gallup, at least, I know didn't do polling for the last presidential election, with good reason considering how badly they embarrassed themselves with the previous one. And their presidential approval numbers are worthless because they don't even filter for registered voters, they go for all adults.
By Doug64
#15177753
@Godstud, have you ever bothered to look at the bottom of my weekly post of poll results? I not only include Rasmussen’s monthly report when it comes out, but I have a rolling average for the week, the past month (last Saturday’s being from May 19 through June 18), and the average for the entire term to date, plus comparisons to Trump and Obama for the same periods in their own administrations. Nor do I ever leave out any of the polls Rasmussen releases in their weekday emails. Just how is that “using Rasmussen polls when they suit me and dismissing them when they don’t”?
By Doug64
#15178794
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-nine percent (39%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending June 17, 2021. This week’s finding is up one point from a week ago. Fifty-four percent (54%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, down one point from a week ago. A year ago at this time, 25% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 68% said it was on the wrong track.

    Thirty-two percent (32%) of American Adults have a favorable opinion of online dating apps like Tinder and OKCupid, including 8% who have a Very Favorable opinion. Thirty-seven percent (37%) have an unfavorable view of online dating apps, including 15% whose opinion is Very Unfavorable. Thirty-two percent (32%) are not sure. The popularity of online dating has increased since 2018, when 21% said they viewed services like eHarmony and match.com favorably. Twenty-nine percent (29%) say they or someone they know have met a person through an online dating app that they ultimately married, down from 32% in 2018. Fifty-eight percent (58%) say no one they know has married someone they met through online dating, and 14% are not sure.

    Eighty-two percent (82%) of Likely U.S. Voters think freedom of religion is important to a healthy American society, including 67% who say it’s Very Important. Only nine percent (9%) disagree, while another 9% say they’re not sure. The survey comes as the Equality Act remains stalled in the U.S. Senate. Opponents of the act, which passed the House in February, have warned that the legislation would strip religious organizations of protection from claims of discrimination on matters of faith. On the question of whether churches and faith-based charities be required by law to hire people who oppose their religious beliefs, 50% of voters say no, 20% say yes, and 30% are not sure.

    Forty-seven percent (47%) of American Adults are planning to take a summer vacation. Thirty-nine percent (39%) don’t plan to take a vacation and 14% are not sure. Only 26% of Americans say they took a summer vacation last year, while 71% did not. Lockdowns in response to the COVID-19 pandemic clearly affected vacation plans in 2020. The number of Americans last year who said they planned a summer vacation was a new low, below even the numbers in the wake of the 2008 economic meltdown.

    Fifty-five percent (55%) of Likely U.S. Voters support forensic audits of election results to ensure there was no vote fraud. Twenty-nine percent (29%) oppose such audits and 17% are not sure. The new survey also found that 41% of voters still don’t believe that Joe Biden won the 2020 presidential election fairly. Arizona’s Republican-controlled state senate is winding down its audit of more than 2 million ballots cast in Maricopa County. Supporters of former President Donald Trump have raised doubt about the results in Maricopa County, which Biden won by about 45,000 votes, larger than his 11,000-vote statewide margin. While a majority of voters support audits to ensure there was no vote fraud, many are concerned about casting doubt on the election process. Forty-eight percent (48%) think that expressing doubt about the outcome of elections undermines democracy in America. Thirty-four percent (34%) say expressing such doubts does not undermine democracy and 18% are not sure.

    Fifty-nine percent (59%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe that what the media thinks matters more to the average member of Congress than what their constituents think. Only 29% of voters believe that constituents matter more than the media to the average member of Congress. Twelve percent (12%) are not sure. The percentage of voters who believe Congress cares more about the media has increased slightly from 55% four years ago. Sixty-two percent (62%) of voters believe most members of Congress don’t care what their constituents think, and only 21% think most Congress members do care what their constituents think. Seventeen percent (17%) are not sure. However, voters are more likely to believe their own representatives care about their opinions. Thirty-five percent (35%) of voters say their Congress member cares what they think, although 49% say their representative doesn’t care what they think and 17% are not sure.

    Forty-nine percent (49%) of Likely U.S. Voters last year’s protests against the police hurt public safety. Just 22% say the protests helped public safety and 21% believe the protests didn’t make much difference to public safety. President Joe Biden announced new anti-crime measures Wednesday, including a “zero tolerance” policy toward gun dealers violating federal rules. Biden’s speech followed record increases in shootings in major cities. Despite concerns that anti-police protests hurt public safety, 49% of voters have a favorable impression of the Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement, including 27% who have a Very Favorable opinion of the movement. Forty-seven percent (47%) have an unfavorable view of BLM, including 32% who have a Very Unfavorable opinion. Opinions of BLM have turned more negative since June 2020, when 62% of voters had a favorable view of the movement.

    Fifty-six percent (56%) of American Adults think it is unfair to make women compete against transgender athletes. Only 25% think such competition is fair and 19% are not sure. Fifty-five percent (55%) say they have closely followed recent news reports about transgender athletes in the upcoming Olympic Games, including 21% who have followed the news Very Closely. Forty-one percent (41%) haven’t followed reports about transgender athletes in the Olympics closely, including 17% who haven’t followed the news at all. Controversy was ignited when it was reported that Laurel Hubbard, a 43-year-old New Zealand weightlifter, would become the first transgender athlete to compete in the Olympics. Hubbard had competed in weightlifting as a man before undergoing sex-reassignment treatment.

    And now Biden's job approval improves a little, with his monthly and to-date numbers still holding steady:

    • Strongly Approve: 31% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 39% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 51% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 47% (-2)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 31%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 39%
    • Total Approve: 51%
    • Total Disapprove: 47%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 32%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 50%
    • Total Disapprove: 48%

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 30%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 46%
    • Total Disapprove: 53% (-1)

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 29%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 44% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 45%
    • Total Disapprove: 54% (-1)

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 32%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 42%
    • Total Approve: 48%
    • Total Disapprove: 52%

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 33% (-2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 33% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 54% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 45% (+1)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 35%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 31% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 55% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 44% (+1)

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 37%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 28%
    • Total Approve: 57%
    • Total Disapprove: 41%
User avatar
By Drlee
#15178801
The survey comes as the Equality Act remains stalled in the U.S. Senate. Opponents of the act, which passed the House in February, have warned that the legislation would strip religious organizations of protection from claims of discrimination on matters of faith. On the question of whether churches and faith-based charities be required by law to hire people who oppose their religious beliefs, 50% of voters say no, 20% say yes, and 30% are not sure.


The Equality Act should stay stalled in the Senate. Government should keeps its hands off of religion, full stop.
By Doug64
#15179759
Drlee wrote:The Equality Act should stay stalled in the Senate. Government should keeps its hands off of religion, full stop.

Something else we agree on, at least in its present form.

I hope everyone in the US has had a fun and safe 4th of July, celebrating our freedoms and equality, and the immense strides we've made in both since the Declaration was signed. Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-nine percent (39%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending July 1, 2021. This week’s finding is up one point from a week ago. Fifty-four percent (54%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, down two points from a week ago. A year ago at this time, 25% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 69% said it was on the wrong track.

    The Rasmussen Reports Immigration Index for the week of June 20-24, 2021, declined to 89.5, down from 90.9 two weeks earlier. This is the first decrease in the index in three months. It reached a record low of 82.3 in late March. The Immigration Index has been under the baseline in every survey since Election Day last year. The index is now 16 points below where it was the week of October 22, indicating voters are looking for tighter immigration control from President Joe Biden’s administration.

    Thirty-four percent (34%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe it is likely Congress will approve new gun control laws, including 11% who think it is Very Likely. Fifty-seven percent (57%) don’t believe it is likely Congress will pass new gun control legislation, including 21% who say it is Not At All Likely. Fifty-four percent (54%) of voters agree that America’s founders “explicitly wanted an armed citizenry to keep potentially tyrannical governments in check,” including 32% who Strongly Agree. That statement is a direct quote from Donald Trump Jr.’s Twitter account. Only 26% of voters disagree, including 15% who Strongly Disagree. Twenty percent (20%) are not sure. Trump Jr.’s quote was in reply to President Biden’s warning Wednesday that Americans would “need F-15s and maybe some nuclear weapons” to “take on the government.” To combat surging urban crime, Biden announced Wednesday that federal “firearms trafficking strike forces” would be used to reduce gun violence. A majority of voters (52%) agree that stricter enforcement of existing gun control laws would do more to reduce gun violence in America, compared to 33% who believe passing new gun control laws would do more. Fifteen percent (15%) are not sure.

    Fifty-two percent (52%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe America needs to spend more on police, while only 18% think the country should spend less on police. Twenty-three percent (23%) say the current amount of funding for police is about right. Sixty-six percent (66%) of voters agree with this statement: “The radical and reckless decisions by some jurisdictions to defund their police forces have had a real and devastating effect on American communities.” That’s a quote from a letter that Republican Reps. Kevin McCarthy and Jim Jordan sent to Attorney General Merrick Garland this month. Only 24% of voters disagree, while 11% are not sure. Seventy-two percent (72%) of Republicans believe America needs to spend more on police, as do 38% of Democrats and 43% of voters not affiliated with either major party. Even among Democrats, however, only 29% think America needs to spend less on police, a belief shared by 10% of Republicans and 13% of unaffiliated voters.

    Forty-one percent (41%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe the danger from the coronavirus is mostly over while 33% think it’s likely there will be a new surge of COVID-19 infections. Twenty-six percent (26%) are not sure. Far more Democrats (45%) than Republicans (23%) or voters not affiliated with either major party (28%) believe it is likely there will be a new surge of COVID-19 infections. A majority of Republicans (51%) think the danger from the virus is mostly over, a view shared by 33% of Democrats and 41% of unaffiliated voters. Fifty-four percent (54%) of all Likely Voters approve of President Joe Biden’s handling of the COVID-19 pandemic, including 35% who Strongly Approve. Forty-three percent (43%) disapprove of Biden’s handling of COVID-19, including 26% who Strongly Disapprove. Those numbers are little changed since March, when 53% of voters approved of Biden’s handling of the pandemic.

    Fifty-one percent (51%) of American Adults think surveillance and security cameras actually reduce crime. Only 27% disagree, while 22% are not sure. Those numbers reflect a slight change from two years ago, when 56% believed security cameras reduced crime. Fifty-six percent (56%) believe that when surveillance and security cameras are used in public spaces, they make those public spaces safer. Twenty-four percent (24%) disagree and 20% are not sure. Thirty-one percent (31%) say that they have felt that a security or surveillance camera violated their privacy, while a majority (55%) say they’ve never felt their privacy was violated by such cameras. Fourteen percent (14%) are not sure.

    Fifty percent (50%) of American Adults think the United States is a nation with liberty and justice for all. Thirty-eight percent (38%) disagree, while 11% are not sure. Those numbers haven’t changed much from four years ago. Politics now affects everything, however, even such basic American beliefs as expressed by the Pledge of Allegiance. While 74% of Republicans and 49% of those not affiliated with either major party believe the United States is a nation with liberty and justice for all, only 33% of Democrats agree. A majority of Democrats (51%) say America is not a nation of liberty and justice for all. Nevertheless, majorities of every demographic wouldn’t want to leave America. If they could live anywhere in the world 72% would live in the United States. Only 18% say they would rather live somewhere else, and 11% are not sure.

    Thirty-two percent (32%) of American Adults believe public health officials are lying about the safety of COVID-19 vaccines. Forty-eight percent (48%) don’t think so, while 20% are not sure. Sixty-three percent (63%) of those surveyed said they had already gotten a COVID-19 vaccination and 32% had not. Among those who haven’t yet been vaccinated against the coronavirus, a majority (54%) said they do not plan to get vaccinated in the future. Distrust of public health officials is higher among the unvaccinated, particularly those who say they don’t plan to get vaccinated against COVID-19 in the future. Among those who have already gotten the COVID-19 vaccine, only 21% think public health officials are lying about the safety of vaccines. That number rises to 50%, however, among the unvaccinated, while 63% of those who say they aren’t vaccinated against coronavirus and don’t plan to get the vaccine in the future believe public health officials are lying about the safety of COVID-19 vaccines.

    Thirty-four percent (34%) of American Adults believe the Founding Fathers would consider the United States a success, down from 40% a year ago. Forty-one percent (41%) now say the Founding Fathers – George Washington, Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin, among others – would view America as a failure. Twenty-five percent (25%) are undecided. The number who now say the Founding Fathers would consider America a failure is still lower than the 49% who said so in 2013. Fifty-four percent (54%) say the Fourth of July is one of America’s most important holidays, up from 49% a year ago, but still below the all-time high of 61% in 2016. Eight percent (8%) see Independence Day as one of our least important holidays, while 33% rate it somewhere in between. Over the years, most Americans have ranked the Fourth of July as the country’s second-most important holiday, just behind Christmas.

    And for Biden's job approval numbers over the past week:

    • Strongly Approve: 29% (-2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 51%
    • Total Disapprove: 47%

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 30% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 50% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 48% (+1)

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 32%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 50%
    • Total Disapprove: 48%

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 29% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43%
    • Total Approve: 46%
    • Total Disapprove: 54% (+1)

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 29%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 44%
    • Total Approve: 46% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 54%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 32%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 42%
    • Total Approve: 48%
    • Total Disapprove: 52%

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 32% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 32% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 54%
    • Total Disapprove: 45%

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 34% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 32% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 55%
    • Total Disapprove: 45% (+1)

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 37%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 29% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 57%
    • Total Disapprove: 42% (+1)
User avatar
By Drlee
#15179968
Biden's approval numbers (looking only at these partisan polls) ought to be disturbing to democrats. It appears they will lose the house and senate in the next election. Why? Because even their base is losing patience with them. They are caving to the far right far to often. They are not exercising moral leadership. They are weak and refuse to do what it takes to forward any kind of a centrist agenda.

And the saddest part is that Biden came into office with about the lowest bar to hurdle in American History.
By Doug64
#15180393
@Drlee, I think you meant Democrats are caving to the Far Left far too often. Beyond that, the Democrats are facing a serious problem. There's a realignment in process, the two parties shifting to economics-based constituencies, the Democrats picking up Whites with higher education, Republicans picking up blue-collar and lower rung white-collar minorities. The problem for the Democrats is that while the votes lie with the lower-class voters they're losing, the cash is in the hands of the upper-class supporters they risk alienating if they try to hold on to the lower-class voters.

So yes, if Biden had actually governed the way he'd promised--middle-left--instead of caving to the Far Left at every opportunity, the Democratic party might be in better electoral shape but would be fighting an even more brutal civil war than it is already.

Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-nine percent (39%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending July 1, 2021. This week’s finding is up one point from a week ago. Fifty-four percent (54%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, down two points from a week ago. A year ago at this time, 25% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 69% said it was on the wrong track.

    Fifty-nine percent (59%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe it is at least somewhat likely that the U.S. government spies on critical journalists and political opponents, including 36% who think it’s Very Likely. Twenty-one percent (21%) of voters don’t think it’s likely the government is spying on opponents, and 20% are not sure. After Carlson said on his June 28 broadcast that the National Security Agency was intercepting his communications, many news organizations dismissed this claim as implausible. However, most voters have long believed the U.S. government spies on political opponents – in January 2019, 61% thought such surveillance was at least somewhat likely. Among those who believe it’s likely the government spies on critical journalists and political opponents, 61% don’t trust the government’s judgment in such surveillance on U.S. citizens.

    Sixty percent (60%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe it is at least somewhat likely that Republicans will pick up the five seats they need to regain control of the U.S. House of Representatives next year, including 35% who think it’s Very Likely. Thirty percent (30%) of voters don’t think it’s likely the GOP will regain control of the House next year, and 10% are not sure. Four years ago, when Democrats needed to gain 25 House seats to take control of Congress, less than half of voters thought it was likely they could do so. Democrats won a House majority in the 2018 midterms, but lost 11 seats in 2020, so the GOP would need to “flip” only five seats to take back control in 2022. It doesn’t look like how Congress votes on Biden’s infrastructure plan will be a deal-breaker for most voters. Asked whether a Congress member’s vote against the plan would affect their own vote, 43% of voters said a member’s vote against the plan would make them more likely to re-elect them, 29% said they would be less likely to re-elect them, and 19% said it would have no impact on their vote.

    Thirty-three percent (33%) of Likely U.S. Voters rate Harris’s handling of America’s immigration problems as excellent or good, while 48% say the vice president has done a poor job of dealing with the crisis since being assigned to the task by President Joe Biden. Sixty-two percent (62%) of voters say the current situation at the U.S.-Mexico border is a crisis – a word the Biden administration spent months avoiding – while 22% say it’s not a crisis and 17% are not sure. Nearly half (49%) of voters believe the Biden administration’s immigration police is worse than the policy of former President Donald Trump. Thirty-five percent (35%) think Biden’s immigration policy is better than the Trump administration, and 11% say there’s not much difference on immigration policy between the two administrations.

    Eighty-one percent (81%) of American Adults believe it is important for young people to participate in sports as part of their development, including 39% who say it’s Very Important. Only 14% don’t think playing sports is important to young people’s development. Those numbers are nearly unchanged from four years ago. When it comes to team sports for children, 50% think rewarding the winners is more important than making sure that everyone is recognized for participating. Forty percent (40%) think recognizing participation is more important, and 11% are not sure. Those numbers are somewhat different than a March 2017 finding that 56% believed it was more important to reward winners. Solid majorities in every demographic category agree that participating in sports is important for young people’s development, and even the usual political divisions make little difference. Eighty-three percent (83%) of Republicans, 82% of Democrats and 79% of those not affiliated with either major party believe it is at least Somewhat Important for young people to participate in sports as part of their development.

    Seventy-eight percent (78%) of Likely U.S. Voters say it’s at least somewhat important for schools to teach the traditional values of Western Civilization, including 52% who say it’s Very Important. This is virtually unchanged from four years ago,and in line with surveys dating back to 2013. Fourteen percent (14%) don’t think it’s important to teach traditional Western values, with only four percent (4%) who say it’s Not At All Important. Only 29% of voters think most public schools do a good job of teaching the traditional values of Western civilization, though that’s up two points from 2017 and the highest finding in surveying since 2013. Forty-seven percent (47%) disagree and do not think schools do a good job. Another 24% are not sure. Among voters who say it is Very Important to teach traditional Western values, 57% don’t think most schools do a good job of teaching those values.

    Fifty-eight percent (58%) of Likely U.S. Voters at least somewhat agree that the media are “truly the enemy of the people,” including 34% who Strongly Agree. Thirty-six percent (36%) don’t agree, including 23% who Strongly Disagree. In the wake of the 2019 Mueller Report, which found no evidence of the “Russian collusion” the media had hyped, Trump tweeted: "Fake News is truly the ENEMY OF THE PEOPLE!" Eighty-three percent (83%) of voters now think “fake news” is a serious problem in the media, including 55% who say it’s a Very Serious problem. Fourteen percent (14%) don’t think “fake news” is a serious problem. Only 37% of voters say they trust the political news they’re getting, while 43% say they don’t trust political news, and 20% are not sure. That’s a slight improvement from April, when only 33% of voters said they trusted political news. That April survey found that 54% of voters think that most reporters, when they write or talk about President Joe Biden, are trying to help the president pass his agenda.

    Economic confidence fell to 108.9 in this month’s Rasmussen Reports Economic Index, down nearly 10 points from June, the second consecutive monthly decline.

    Enthusiasm about the economy surged under former President Trump, reaching as high as 147.8 in January 2020 before tumbling after the coronavirus lockdown threw Americans out of work and closed many businesses. By November, it had recovered to 126.4, but dropped sharply in the three months after President Biden was elected. The index fell to 97.8 in February before beginning a three-month rebound that took the index to 123.7 in May, but has declined again the past two months.

    Thirty-four percent (34%) of American Adults rate the economy as good or excellent this month, down four points from last month and eight points below the 42% mark in November. The number who rate the economy as poor increase increased to 29%, up three points from June. Thirty percent (30%) now think the economy is getting better, down four points from last month. Forty-six percent (46%) expect a worsening economy, up two points from last month, but still 10 points lower than in February. Eighteen percent (18%) now see things staying about the same, up three points from last month. There has been a remarkable reversal since President Biden was elected, as Democrats are now more bullish on the economy than Republicans. Forty-eight percent (48%) of Democrats view the economy as good or excellent, compared to 25% of Republicans and 29% of those not affiliated with either major party. GOP confidence has declined 52 points since November, when 74% of Republicans had a positive view of the economy, while Democrats’ confidence has risen 16 points from 32% in November. While 68% of Republicans before the election said they expected the economy will improve, only 15% feel that way now. Democrats are now more optimistic, with 50% saying they expect the economy to get better, an increase of 30 points since January. Twenty-eight percent (24%) of those unaffiliated with either major party now are optimistic that the economy will get better, up eight points from January, and one point higher than before the election.

    And for Biden's job approval numbers over the past week:

    • Strongly Approve: 29%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 49% (-2)
    • Total Disapprove: 50% (+3)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 30%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 50%
    • Total Disapprove: 48%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 32%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 50%
    • Total Disapprove: 48%

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 27% (-2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 46% (+3)
    • Total Approve: 44% (-2)
    • Total Disapprove: 56% (+2)

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 29%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 44%
    • Total Approve: 46%
    • Total Disapprove: 54%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 32%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 42%
    • Total Approve: 48%
    • Total Disapprove: 52%

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 32%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 37% (+5)
    • Total Approve: 52% (-2)
    • Total Disapprove: 47% (+2)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 34%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 33% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 54% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 45%

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 36% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 29%
    • Total Approve: 57%
    • Total Disapprove: 42%
By Doug64
#15181427
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-nine percent (39%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending July 8, 2021. This week’s finding remains the same as a week ago. Fifty-four percent (54%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, also unchanged from a week ago. A year ago at this time, 24% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 72% said it was on the wrong track.

    The Rasmussen Reports Immigration Index for the week of July 6-8, 2021, declined to 89.3, down from 89.5 two weeks earlier. This is the second consecutive decrease in the index, following three months of gains. The index reached a record low of 82.3 in late March. The Immigration Index has been under the baseline in every survey since Election Day last year. The index is now more than 16 points below where it was the week of October 22, indicating voters are looking for tighter immigration control from President Joe Biden’s administration.

    Fifty-two percent (52%) of American Adults say they’re at least somewhat likely to watch a large portion of the Summer Olympics coverage on television, including 20% who say it’s Very Likely they’ll watch the Olympics. Twenty-three percent (23%) are Not Very Likely to watch a large portion of the Olympics, and 20% say it’s Not At All Likely they’ll tune in when the Tokyo games begin July 23. Thirty-four percent (34%) say political protests by Olympic athletes make them less likely to watch the Tokyo games, while 15% say such protests make them more likely to watch, and 45% say protests by athletes make no difference. Gwen Berry sparked controversy at the U.S. Olympic track and field trials last month when the bronze medalist in the hammer throw faced away from the flag during the playing of the “Star Spangled Banner.” Forty-six percent (46%) of Americans believe the U.S. Olympic Committee should punish an athlete who refuses to stand during the national anthem. Thirty-nine percent (39%) don’t think U.S. athletes should be punished for not standing for the anthem and 15% are not sure.

    Fifty-three percent (53%) of Likely U.S. Voters think it’s a bad idea for officials to go “door to door – literally knocking on doors” to get people to take the COVID-19 vaccine. Thirty-seven percent (37%) think Biden’s “door-to-door” vaccine push is a good idea. Ten percent (10%) are not sure. In his July 6 White House speech, Biden said “millions of Americans are still unvaccinated and unprotected, and because of that, their communities are at risk. … Now we need to go to community by community, neighborhood by neighborhood, and oftentimes, door to door — literally knocking on doors — to get help to the remaining people protected from the virus.” Seventy-one percent (71%) of voters surveyed say they’ve already gotten vaccinated against COVID-19. Some employers are now requiring employees to get the vaccine, and the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has said such mandates are legal, but many voters are wary of making COVID-19 vaccine a work requirement. Forty-three percent (43%) of voters say it should be legal for employers to require employees to get vaccinated against COVID-19, but 40% say it should not be legal and 17% are not sure.

    Thirty-two percent (32%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe U.S. military forces should be withdrawn from Afghanistan, even if it means the Taliban takes over that country. Thirty-six percent (36%) disagree and 33% are not sure. Even though less than a third of voters support the withdrawal, however, 55% at least somewhat agree (including 25% who Strongly Agree) with President Biden’s statement last week: “The current security situation only confirms that just one more year fighting in Afghanistan is not a solution, but a recipe for being there indefinitely.” Twenty-one percent (21%) of voters disagree, and 23% are not sure. Thirty-nine percent (39%) of voters think withdrawing U.S. troops from Afghanistan will increase the risk of terrorist attacks against America, while only eight percent (8%) believe the withdrawal will decrease the risk of terrorist attacks here. Thirty-seven percent (37%) think withdrawing from Afghanistan will not make much difference in terms of the risk of terrorism against the U.S., and 16% are not sure.

    Forty-five percent (45%) of Likely U.S. Voters support the Democratic walkout in Texas, including 30% who Strongly Support it. Forty-six percent (46%) oppose the Texas walkout, including 37% who Strongly Oppose it. Among Democratic voters, however, 73% support the Texas walkout, including 54% who Strongly Support it. Sixty-nine percent (69%) of Republican voters oppose the Texas walkout, as do 49% of voters not affiliated with either major party. Texas Democratic lawmakers said they were leaving the state to prevent a legislative quorum for “dangerous legislation that would trample on Texans’ freedom to vote.” However, most voters support measures to prevent cheating in elections. Sixty-six percent (66%) of voters say laws requiring voters to show photo identification such as a driver’s license before being allowed to vote are necessary to “a fair and secure election process.” Twenty-four percent (24%) disagree and 10% are not sure. A majority of voters (53%) say making sure there is no cheating in elections is more important than making it easier for everybody to vote, while 43% think it’s more important to make it easier to vote.

    Thirty-seven percent (37%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe media should report contents of e-mails sent and received by public officials even if those e-mails were obtained illegally. That’s down from 45% in July 2018. Forty percent (40%) of voters now say media should respect the privacy of those who wrote and received official e-mails, up from 32% three years ago. Twenty-four percent (24%) are not sure. The shift against publishing leaked emails crosses party lines. Three years ago, 51% of Republicans, 48% of Democrats and 36% of voters not affiliated with either major party thought the media should report contents of e-mails sent and received by public officials even if those e-mails were obtained illegally. Now just 37% of Republicans, 38% of Democrats and 33% of unaffiliated voters think the media should publish official email leaks. Voters are divided over how well the U.S. government protects its secrets, with 38% saying the government generally does a good job of protecting its secrets, and 39% saying it doesn’t, while 23% are not sure. Those numbers are virtually unchanged from three years ago.

    Thirty-nine percent (39%) of American Adults believe schools should require children to get vaccinated against COVID-19. Forty-five percent (45%) oppose mandatory COVID-19 vaccination for school children, and 16% are not sure. Similarly, 39% think schools should require children to wear masks to protect against the coronavirus, while 42% are against schools requiring masks and 19% are not sure. Politics divides public opinion on these issues. While a majority (56%) of Democrats believe schools should require children to get the COVID-19 vaccine, only 29% of Republicans and 30% of those unaffiliated with either major party agree. Majorities of Republicans (61%) and the unaffiliated (52%) oppose schools requiring children to be vaccinated against COVID-19, as do 25% of Democrats. A nearly identical division is apparent on the issue of schools forcing children to wear masks. Fifty-eight percent (58%) of Democrats believe schools should require children to wear masks to protect against COVID-19, but only 27% of Republicans and 32% of the unaffiliated agree. Most Republicans (60%) and a plurality of the unaffiliated (44%) oppose schools requiring children to wear masks, a view shared by 23% of Democrats.

    And for Biden's job approval numbers over the past week. This might be the first time he's been below 50% for two weeks in a row:

    • Strongly Approve: 30% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 49%
    • Total Disapprove: 49% (-1)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 30%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 50%
    • Total Disapprove: 49% (+1)

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 32%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 50%
    • Total Disapprove: 48%

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 27%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 46%
    • Total Approve: 44%
    • Total Disapprove: 56%

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 29%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 44%
    • Total Approve: 46%
    • Total Disapprove: 54%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 31% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 42%
    • Total Approve: 48%
    • Total Disapprove: 52%

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 29% (-3)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 36% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 52%
    • Total Disapprove: 47%

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 32% (-2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 34% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 53% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 46% (+1)

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 36%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 29%
    • Total Approve: 57%
    • Total Disapprove: 42%
By Doug64
#15182285
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-nine percent (39%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending July 15, 2021. This week’s finding remains the same for the third week in a row. Fifty-four percent (54%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, also remaining unchanged for the third week in a row. A year ago at this time, 24% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 70% said it was on the wrong track.

    Fifty-one percent (51%) of Likely U.S. Voters think Trump deserves more credit for the COVID-19 vaccination program. Forty-one percent (41%) believe Biden deserves more credit. Fifty-six percent (56%) of voters approve of Biden’s handling of the COVID-19 pandemic, including 34% who Strongly Approve. Forty-two percent (42%) disapprove of Biden’s handling of the pandemic, including 29% who Strongly Disapprove. Thirty-nine percent (39%) say Biden’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic is better than Trump’s, but 45% think Biden’s handling of the pandemic is worse than Trump’s, and 13% rate the two about the same.

    Sixty-one percent (61%) of Likely U.S. Voters agree with a statement Trump issued last week on his website: “Election Reform must happen in Swing States like Pennsylvania, Michigan, Georgia, Wisconsin, and Arizona where voters have lost confidence in their electoral process.” That includes 42% who Strongly Agree. Thirty-four percent (34%) of voters disagree with Trump’s statement, including 25% who Strongly Disagree. The percentage of voters agreeing with Trump’s statement was larger than those agreeing with a quote from a recent speech by Biden, who said America is “facing the most significant test of our democracy since the Civil War.” Fifty-six percent (56%) agree with Biden, including 33% who Strongly Agree. Thirty-seven percent (37%) disagree with Biden, including 26% who strongly disagree. The war of words between the president and ex-president comes as several states, including Georgia, have passed new voting laws addressing issues raised in the wake of last year’s election. In April, 51% of voters said it was likely that cheating affected the outcome of the 2020 presidential election. That April survey found most voters (60%) believe it is more important to make sure there is no cheating in elections than to make it easier for everybody to vote.

    Sixty-six percent (66%) of Likely U.S. Voters think Congress should investigate last year’s violent protests, in which more than 2,000 police officers suffered injuries in the line of duty. Twenty-one percent (21%) don’t think Congress should investigate last year’s protests, and 13% were not sure. The survey found strong voter support for law enforcement on issues ranging from display of the “Thin Blue Line” flag to prosecution of so-called “quality of life” crimes. According to a study of 68 cities by the Major Cities Chiefs Association, in the summer of 2020, there were at least 574 protests that involved acts of violence, including assaults on police officers, looting and arson. The number of voters who want Congress to investigate last year’s violent protests is higher than the 49% who say they support House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s select committee investigation of the January 6 Capitol riot. Forty-two percent (42%) say they don’t support the January 6 investigation.

    Fifty-nine percent (59%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe the policies of the Communist government in Cuba are more to blame for current problems there. Twenty percent (20%) think the U.S. economic embargo of Cuba is more to blame, and 21% are not sure. Thousands of Cubans in Havana began protesting July 11 against food shortages and high prices. Last week, Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas warned that Cubans fleeing unrest and persecution from the island’s communist regime would be turned away. Fifty-two percent (52%) of voters believe refugees from Cuba should be allowed into the United States, while just 28% say the U.S. shouldn’t admit Cuban refugees. Twenty percent (20%) are not sure.

    Seventy percent (70%) of American Adults think the term “racism” refers to any discrimination by people of one race against another. Just 16% say it refers only to discrimination by white people against minorities. Another 14% are not sure. These findings have not changed much since 2020. Fourteen percent (14%) now believe most white Americans are racist, but 23% think most Black Americans are racist. Only 10% say most Asians and Hispanics are racist. These findings can be compared to survey results from 2013, when 15% considered most whites to be racist but 37% believed most Blacks were racist.

    Fifty-one percent (51%) of Likely U.S. Voters have at least a somewhat favorable opinion of Biden, including 33% whose opinion is Very Favorable. Forty-eight percent (48%) view Biden unfavorably, including 39% who have a Very Unfavorable opinion of him. Trump’s total favorability (52%) is roughly equal to Biden’s, with 34% saying they have a Very Favorable opinion of Trump. Forty-six percent (46%) have an unfavorable opinion of Trump, including 38% whose opinion is Very Unfavorable. Neither Biden nor Trump, however, is as popular as Obama. Fifty-five percent (55%) of voters now view Obama favorably, including 35% who have a Very Favorable opinion of him. Forty-three percent (43%) of voters still view Obama unfavorably, but only 26% of those have a Very Unfavorable opinion of him.

    Thirty-eight percent (38%) of American Adults now say the job market is better than it was a year ago. Thirty-nine percent (35%) say the job market is worse than a year ago, and 19% say it’s about the same as it was a year ago. Those numbers are a significant improvement from late April, when only 28% believed the job market was better than a year earlier and 39% said it was worse. Despite the improved outlook, the number who say the job market is better is still well below the all-time high of 47% in October 2018. Thirty-nine percent (39%) of Americans now believe that unemployment will be lower a year from now, while 28% expect unemployment will be higher, and 21% think it will be about the same. The number who expect unemployment to decline is an all-time high, eclipsing the previous high of 36% in January 2011.

    And for Biden's job approval numbers over the past week. This might be the first time he's been below 50% for two weeks in a row:

    • Strongly Approve: 30%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 38% (-2)
    • Total Approve: 50% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 48% (-1)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 30%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 49% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 49%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 32%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 50%
    • Total Disapprove: 48%

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 27%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 47% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 43% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 57% (+1)

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 28% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 46% (+2)
    • Total Approve: 45% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 55% (+1)

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 31%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 42%
    • Total Approve: 48%
    • Total Disapprove: 52%

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 29%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 36%
    • Total Approve: 51% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 48% (+1)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 31% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 35% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 53%
    • Total Disapprove: 46%

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 36%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 29%
    • Total Approve: 57%
    • Total Disapprove: 42%
  • 1
  • 65
  • 66
  • 67
  • 68
  • 69

:roll: That's not an honest question. Has any[…]

[quote="wat0n"][/quote] Politics_Obse[…]

Trump on trial

To be honest, I think Joseph Joe should argue a d[…]

@JohnRawls If that's laundered Russian money […]