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#15151120
Politics_Observer wrote:
@ckaihatsu

I would simply use Top on a Linux system to check to see how much % CPU processing power specific processes are using of the CPU. It can also check to see how much RAM memory a process is also using and give it to you in a percentage. On a Windows operating system you can run Performance Monitor with specific counters to track certain statistics over time as well to help you figure out any sort of performance issues your computer and operating system might be having.

You can use your performance monitor to monitor specific counters of your choosing as a baseline. You can use a user defined collector set to monitor things over time within Performance Monitor. Using the data collector sets in Performance Monitor will create a log file you can look over to see any performance issues over time. You can make the log files cyclic to where if the log file reaches a certain size, it will simply start writing over old data. This is a good idea so your log file doesn't get too large on the mass storage of your Windows system.



Thanks, PO -- I'm basically treating this as the 'tech' thread, and posting information that I think is relevant.

I don't think that it's necessarily a *discussion*-oriented kind of thread, but thanks for the response anyway.
#15161042
Just thought I'd drop a quick note on AnLinux and Termux....

I haven't even tried out the GUI, but I'm happily running an Ubuntu install (and filesystem) from the command line within Termux, with access to a folder on my smartphone's internal filesystem.

https://termux.com/
https://f-droid.org/en/packages/exa.lnx.a/


I found that, after installing Java ('apt-cache search jdk'), I can even *render* 3D graphics scenes on the smartphone, using Sunflow -- (!)

http://sunflow.sourceforge.net/


Here's a sample rendering command:

java -server -Xmx1024M -jar /filepath/SunflowSVN/sunflow.jar -nogui -aa 1 1 -resolution 3200 2400 -o "/filepath/210204.005 unit cube for 3D tiling SCENE.sc.007.png" "/filepath/210204.005 unit cube for 3D tiling SCENE.sc"


And, if switching over to an Android app to view the results is too cumbersome for you, there's even a command line program for Linux that displays any image file to the *terminal* screen, approximating the pixels using lines of *characters* in the terminal window. (Maximize your terminal window and then try 'chafa --stretch').

https://hpjansson.org/chafa/
#15161043
@ckaihatsu

Thanks for sharing buddy! I downloaded Termux onto my Android smartphone once I saw your post and played with the CLI a little. I haven't thoroughly tinkered with your other links yet, but I plan to take a more careful look at them when I have more time. Having to study right now. Appreciate it man! Thank you!
#15161053
Politics_Observer wrote:
@ckaihatsu

Thanks for sharing buddy! I downloaded Termux onto my Android smartphone once I saw your post and played with the CLI a little. I haven't thoroughly tinkered with your other links yet, but I plan to take a more careful look at them when I have more time. Having to study right now. Appreciate it man! Thank you!



Yup -- no prob, hope it helps you and/or someone else.

Btw, I've found an excellent use for having the command line on a smartphone -- a very good implementation of a to-do list.

I used TaskWarrior (on a laptop) in past years just to keep track of my graphics projects ideas, and mostly in a simple-list way, but for day-to-day to-do stuff even that was too complicated for my needs.

https://taskwarrior.org/docs/start.html


So, after 'apt install'[ing] a couple of things like nano and bc, I now just use a plain text file, like 'YYMMDD_to-do', with 1 line for each item, in the format of 'YYMMDD [ ] dig up yard for buried treasure [FINANCE] [EXERCISE]', where the '[ ]' thingee is an unchecked check box, and the two bracketed capitalized words are to-do-list 'tags' that can be searched-for and aggregated-with, given any matching search term. (If I'm catching-up to an item I wrote down already I can use 'YYMMDD YYMMDD [ ]...', meaning that the first YYMMDD is 'now', the date of entering the item, while the second one is when I first thought it up or wrote it down on paper somewhere.)

I like how light and nimble this implementation is -- there *is* a checkmark symbol available two keyboards in on Android, or one could use an 'x' or whatever, if that's easier. Anything used repeatedly during an edit, like the checkmark, can just be cut / copied and pasted. Entire lines of list-items can easily be cut-and-pasted, to move them around for re-prioritizations, and line space can be added to make little groupings from top to bottom.

I use a *slash*, \, for canceled items (in the "checkbox"), and a bullet, •, for quasi-completed, or irregularly-resulting items.

And that's it -- I'll copy the text file forward for each new day, so that '210313_to-do' becomes '210314_to-do' tomorrow. I then group-up all of the 'done' items together, at the very bottom, and I spin-off a '.999' version, like '210314.999_to-do', in which I'll *cut* / delete all of the blank-checkbox items, leaving just the very-bottom, 'done' ones, and then save it out. Conversely I'll go into the regular file, '210314_to-do', and then delete the very-bottom 'done' items so that they're no longer present or carried forward in the regular to-do file, into future calendar dates. The '.999' versions will still have the done items, for reference and archiving.

I can go and do errands and then just whip out the smartphone wherever I am and do a 'search' over all lines in the current text file, using grep, like 'cat 210314_to-do | grep HOUSEHOLD'.

I've looked over several to-do apps and have never found this kind of simple functionality in any previous approach, though many are certainly good and adequate.

I'll also note that even whole spreadsheet-like *tables* can be made and used in this way, just by using commas between fields, with the text lines being the rows.

Again, hope this helps the reader. Take care, see you on the threads, PO.
#15161054
@ckaihatsu

Thanks again bud! You mentioned you did graphics projects. Have you ever considered learning Photoshop, Gimp and/or Figma? You can use these skills to get paid for web design or designing post cards or any sort of card really or taking black and white photographs and adding color to them or touching up already colored photos. Figma is excellent for web design and prototyping that would in turn be very useful to web developers. You can get paid big bucks using these various different tools working in the User Experience and User Interface field.
#15161055
@ckaihatsu

Somebody like you would fit in well being a user experience designer. You can develop a portfolio of your work, get a LinkedIn profile, put your profile on LinkedIn, email some of these companies giving them a sample of your work and you might find yourself with a decent paying job. Here is some salary ranges for User Experience designers.

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

There is some money in what you do if you apply for these User Experience jobs. Some of these companies will pay like $150,000 bucks a year for experienced and very good User Experience designers. Companies that pay the best are American companies. It's all you man. You can do it.

https://careerfoundry.com/en/blog/ux-de ... -designer/
#15161131
Politics_Observer wrote:
@ckaihatsu

Thanks again bud! You mentioned you did graphics projects. Have you ever considered learning Photoshop, Gimp and/or Figma? You can use these skills to get paid for web design or designing post cards or any sort of card really or taking black and white photographs and adding color to them or touching up already colored photos. Figma is excellent for web design and prototyping that would in turn be very useful to web developers. You can get paid big bucks using these various different tools working in the User Experience and User Interface field.



Politics_Observer wrote:@ckaihatsu

Somebody like you would fit in well being a user experience designer. You can develop a portfolio of your work, get a LinkedIn profile, put your profile on LinkedIn, email some of these companies giving them a sample of your work and you might find yourself with a decent paying job. Here is some salary ranges for User Experience designers.

[img]https://i.imgur.com/avXuf7y.png[img]

[img]https://i.imgur.com/IxmwMoH.png[img]

[img]https://i.imgur.com/6HJxiKC.png[img]

[img]https://i.imgur.com/LXhTblc.png[img]

[img]https://i.imgur.com/V2PGQ6S.png[img]

[img]https://i.imgur.com/iFdoI49.png[img]

There is some money in what you do if you apply for these User Experience jobs. Some of these companies will pay like $150,000 bucks a year for experienced and very good User Experience designers. Companies that pay the best are American companies. It's all you man. You can do it.

https://careerfoundry.com/en/blog/ux-de ... -designer/



'Ppreciate it, PO -- yeah, I was around desktop publishing back in high school and worked through a few agencies during the dotcom era, and didn't really want to follow the web / HTML avenue when that took off around then. I'd been anticipating the 3D thing, and now it's here, finally, with very good rendering quality, good processing power and short rendering times.

I'd been using Photoshop since the late eighties, when it was version 2.0a, and I was using Illustrator as well. I switched my entire workflow over to Linux around 2010, so now I use GIMP with G'MIC plugins. My work / accomplishments are at the link below:


--
___

RedMarx - A Forum
tinyurl.com/ckaihatsu-redmarx

Politics Forum
tinyurl.com/ckaihatsu-pofo

RevLeft.com -- Home of the Revolutionary Left
tinyurl.com/ckaihatsu-revleft

Photoillustrations, Political Diagrams by Chris Kaihatsu
postimage.org/ckaihatsu

Meetup.com
meetup.com/members/1278720


-- More atypical than most --
#15161138
@ckaihatsu

Well that's understandable. It doesn't matter how much money they pay you or throw at you if you don't enjoy and love the work you do. Money is only a motivator up to a certain point. After that point, it's no longer a motivator. So, I think it's important for people to find a job they love, enjoy AND pays well, that way they enjoy life much more because they are working a job they love and enjoy AND are also paid well for it so they make enough to meet their living needs and to be able to afford to enjoy a vacation or own a few nice things.
#15161155
Politics_Observer wrote:
@ckaihatsu

Well that's understandable. It doesn't matter how much money they pay you or throw at you



Um, *how* much money is being thrown at me here -- ? (grin)


Politics_Observer wrote:
if you don't enjoy and love the work you do. Money is only a motivator up to a certain point. After that point, it's no longer a motivator. So, I think it's important for people to find a job they love, enjoy AND pays well, that way they enjoy life much more because they are working a job they love and enjoy AND are also paid well for it so they make enough to meet their living needs and to be able to afford to enjoy a vacation or own a few nice things.



(The hole I've dug in the backyard to look for buried treasure is practically *geothermal* now....)


= D
#15161660
Termux on Android, for a Linux command line on your smartphone, for a 'killer app' to-do list


Introduction

I'm going to cover this to-do list thing in a little more detail, so as to make an easier on-ramp for people who are entirely new to the Linux command line. I really think that this is an excellent implementation of a to-do list, and is now *very* useful due to the portability of everyday smartphones.

The Termux app is installable like any other, and immediately gives the user a Linux command line prompt upon launching the app. Everything covered here can be done in this environment, with only a couple of quick and easy installs of software for Linux -- tiny command-line programs that add to the overall functionality of the 'shell', as the command line is called.

Depending on how serious one wants to get about this approach to a portable computerized to-do list, one can optionally add on a couple of useful accessories that will turn your phone into a small but capable command line computer terminal, and possibly further.

For a more 'desktop' feel, one can get a mini tripod for the phone, and a small 'HTPC' external Bluetooth keyboard and trackpad -- I have the kind where the trackpad is at the top-middle, with the mini-keyboard below it. Make sure that it's a *Bluetooth* device, and not the '2.4 Ghz' kind, which is actually a wireless *USB* connection, requiring a USB dongle to be plugged into a USB port, which smartphones typically do *not* have. For that matter, one could also use a full-size Bluetooth keyboard, for a regular typing experience into the phone, if desired, and any other Bluetooth input devices, like a mouse, trackpad, or trackball, as well.

AnLinux says that you can run a graphical user interface (GUI) on top of an OS install (like Ubuntu), but I haven't tried this myself. Any OS install (like Ubuntu) is *optional* for the purposes of this tutorial, since the regular Termux ('rootkit') install is sufficient for the simple commands / software used for this to-do list approach.

I previously mentioned actually *rendering* 3D graphics scenes with Sunflow, requiring a Java install, which, as far as I can see, *isn't* possible with just the Termux rootkit -- I went ahead and installed Ubuntu, according to the directions from the AnLinux app, and was then able to install a standard OpenJDK version of Java into the Ubuntu environment.

You're going to have to move files around various filesystems since the Termux filesystem is *separate* from the existing Android internal storage -- though can be *linked* -- and is also separate from any microSD 'external' SD card / drive that you may have added to the phone.

I recommend the free 'ES File Explorer' app for Android-side file management.

Termux-sided file management requires knowing how to use a few basic Linux commands, which I'll be covering here.


First steps

The very first thing to do is to get that filesystem *link* between the Termux filesystem, and your existing Android 'internal' drive so that you can pass files back and forth as needed.



It is necessary to grant storage permission for Termux on Android 6 and higher. Use 'Settings>Apps>Termux>Permissions>Storage' and set to true.



https://wiki.termux.com/wiki/Termux-setup-storage



Then use the 'termux-setup-storage' command.

If you go on to install a full Linux-type OS like Ubuntu, a 'ubuntu-fs' directory will be created in the 'storage' directory, in the Termux 'home' directory -- ~/storage/ubuntu-fs/root -- and files can be transferred to and from the Ubuntu environment through this directory, and also through to the Android 'Download' folder -- ~/storage/downloads being the Linux filepath.

As you can see, the tilde character, ~, is synonymous with the 'home' directory, which Termux defaults to.

One can switch over to the 'home' directory by *changing the directory*, 'cd', to home, '~' -- the command 'cd ~'.

You can *verify* that you're in the home directory by using the 'pwd' -- 'print working directory' -- command.

Likewise, you can change-directory to any of the *other* directories by 'cd'-ing to *those* locations: 'cd ~/storage/downloads', or 'cd ~/storage/ubuntu-fs/root' (without the single quotation marks), if you've installed Ubuntu.

The entire 'filesystem' is hierarchically ordered in this way, with folders inside of 'higher' folders, all the way up to '/', the first slash on any given filepath, which is considered to be 'root', though there's often a separate, different folder explicitly called 'root', as with the example of '~/storage/ubuntu-fs/root'. You can 'cd' to anywhere you like in the filesystem, using 'cd foldername', 'cd /path/to/folder', or 'cd ..' (two periods) to go 'up' a level in the hierarchy. Use 'pwd' anytime to get the full filepath of where you happen to be located in the hierarchy.


Perks of the command line

Along the way you may find that you're using a particular command *repeatedly* -- there's a shortcut with using the command line. Just use the 'up arrow' on the keyboard, or '↑' on the middle-right edge of the Termux window, just above the screen keyboard. Each press of the up-arrow will bring up past commands used, from recent to distant. One may also *edit* any past command, once reproduced, and then press Enter to use that command as it appears. Pro tip: Do a search over *all* past commands by referring to the entire history of commands that's stored by the operating system: cat ~/.bash_history | grep mysearchterm

Use 'ls' to *list* out the folders and files that are in the location that you're currently at. Then 'cd foldername' to change your directory to that of any folder listed. Files can't be 'cd'-ed to -- but they can be *read*, and edited. Try the cat command, 'cat filename', to *concatenate*, or *read*, the contents of any given file -- not folders. Missed it because the contents were too lengthy and most of it just scrolled up, past the viewable screen? For any given output to the screen, like that from the 'cat' command, you can 'pipe' the output to *another* command, called 'more', so as to *page* the contents, screenful-by-screenful, using the space bar. (Or line-by-line, using the Return key.) The command is then: cat filename | more

Note that the shortcut to the 'home' directory, '~', is shorthand for the full filepath of '/home/user', typically, though in this Termux rootkit installation the home directory is actually '/data/data/com.termux/files/home'.

If any given filepath feels to be too *long* in length, and unwieldy, having to type it over and over again, one can use *symlinks* to *shorten* the name needed to specify a filepath, as for commands to change to that directory, and for moving files to and from that directory.

For example, I changed to the home directory and used the 'ln -s ~/storage/downloads internal' command to specify ~/internal as being equivalent to ~/storage/downloads. (I also did 'ln -s ~/storage/ubuntu-fs/root linux', to specify ~/linux as equivalent to ~/storage/ubuntu-fs/root.)


Installations

Okay, hopefully you're a little more comfortable with how the Linux filesystem works, and how to move around in it. We can get to installing additional (command-line) software that's critical to making the 'to-do' implementation work.

In Termux the install command is 'pkg install packagename', though in Ubuntu it's 'apt install packagename'.

I'm going to recommend installing two packages, 'nano', and 'bc', plus three additional optional packages, for *compressing* folders and files into a compressed 'zip' file, for archiving and long-term file storage -- as into the Android 'Downloads' directory and beyond.

So first get online and update the software packages repository with 'pkg update', then execute the command 'pkg install nano', then 'pkg install bc' -- or one could do both with the single command, 'pkg install nano bc'.

Nano is a terminal-based *text* editor, and it works similarly to any basic text editor you may have used before elsewhere. Note that the key combination of CONTROL-S may be used to *save* your text file at any given moment, to the filename specified when you first started nano, like 'nano 210317_to-do'.

CONTROL-X is used to *exit* nano, and if you haven't already saved your text file at that point you'll be prompted to do so before nano exits. Also, CONTROL-C is generally used as a *break*, or *interrupt*, for any given process that one would like to arbitrarily stop, immediately.

'Bc' is a 'basic calculator' that does math the way one would *expect* it to -- the Linux shell itself is limited to *integers*, unfortunately, so invoking / using bc is a must, most of the time.

Compare the output from 'echo $((13 / 3))', to 'echo "scale=8; 13 / 3" | bc -l'. ('Echo' means 'print to the screen'.)


Limitless euphoria

So, to wrap up, let's do a quick sample 'to-do' scenario, using everything covered so far....

At the Termux shell prompt ('$') do the command 'nano 2103xx_to-do'.

In this case I'm using 'xx' instead of the two numbers for the date of the month. After this example you can always *repurpose* this text file as a *template*, for your own needs.

In the nano text editor window go ahead and type in:

210317 210316 [ ] install Termux on my Android smartphone [PERSONAL] [PROJECT] [TO-DO] [7]
210317 [ ] read through the 'to-do' tutorial a second time [TO-DO] [5]
210317 [ ] do a search for the Linux 'copy' command [TO-DO] [6]

When you're done, do CONTROL-S to save the file to its filename, '2103xx_to-do'. Then do CONTROL-X to exit nano.

Now the fun begins -- by including those to-do item 'tags' (in the brackets), you've enabled a way to *group* several items together, potentially over dozens, hundreds, and thousands of items, by whatever tags you use, arbitrarily, across *all* item entries / lines, and even across multiples files, if you want.

So, for the 3 items in the text file you just created, try using the following command: 'cat 2103xx_to-do | grep 210316'.

Underwhelming, right? All you get from that command is the first line in the text file, which happens to have the search term, '210316', in it. But consider that, over time, you may be entering *several* to-do items into your file, and, after a few months, the number of entries will add up to *many*, and you may want to look back to a certain date like Tuesday, March 16, 2021. Months from now that date, or any other, may have several entries, and maybe you want to find all of the entries for the whole month of March -- try just using the YYMM part: 'cat 2103xx_to-do | grep 2103'.

Now you get all three entries, because all three are from March. Need to narrow it down some more? You can *chain* more searches together, by putting grep commands in *series*, like this: 'cat 2103xx_to-do | grep 2103 | grep Termux'. If you wanted to do two or more searches *in parallel*, then the command would be: 'cat 2103xx_to-do | grep -e 2103 -e Termux', meaning that you're looking for all entries that either contain '2103' *or* 'Termux' (or both). The *former* command reads as 'Search the 2103xx_to-do file for any lines that contain '2103', and, of those matches, search for any lines that contain the term 'Termux'.

I included the tag 'TO-DO' as a *project name*, so all three of these entries happen to be a part of this 'TO-DO' project, with the main project *item* having the additional designation of '[PROJECT]'. (So if you had several projects going on simultaneously you could find the project description of all of them just by doing a 'grep' for 'PROJECT'.

Finally, I also included a *priority* ranking for each item, in brackets, so one could start the day by searching all items / lines by *priority*, starting with '[10]', then '[9]', '[8]', etc., to get to the most important items across all projects -- use 'fgrep' instead of 'grep' anytime you're searching for terms that include brackets.


Status seeking

As I mentioned in a previous post the '[ ]' part works like a *checkbox*, so that once an item is completed, a checkmark, '✓', may be inserted in there between the two spaces. For quasi-completed or irregularly-ended items I myself use a 'bullet' character, '•', and may just carry the item forward, into a *new* item, if appropriate. Canceled items get a forward slash, '\'.

This means that one could 'fgrep' according to *status*, for *uncompleted* items ('[ ]'), for *finished* items ('•'), or for *cancelled* items ('\') -- use: fgrep \\ Combining grep commands, in series or in parallel, would yield sophisticated searches with more precise meanings, such as 'all the completed or finished items from all projects from February'. Can you create a cat and grep command that does this specific search?


Unwitting database administration

A final technique here puts the user at the edge of handling *relational databases*, but without having to learn any database language, or even having to start up a spreadsheet -- the command is the modest 'cut' command, which serves to treat each and every line in your text file as a potential *database entry*, for further processing.

For example, let's say that I wanted to pass along the items that I did, to someone else in an email, to let them know what I happen to be working on. I *could* just copy-and-paste the lines from the text file (after being 'cat'-ed to the screen), but they have all of that particular 'to-do' stuff around the actual descriptions, and I just want the descriptions themselves.

We can treat these lines according to *any* character on the lines that serves to *break up sections* of a line into separate parts, the way that *columns* do naturally, in an actual spreadsheet. In this case I see *two* characters that could be used to programmatically isolate just the description part: ']', and '[' (closed-bracket, and open-bracket).

And here's the command: cat 2103xx_to-do | cut -d']' -f2 | cut -d'[' -f1.

What this is saying is 'Concatenate (read) the 2103xx_to-do file, and for every line look for the closed-bracket character, and use that character as a *delimiter* (divider) in the line of text, and return just the *2nd* 'field' (everything after the first ']' but before the second ']'). Since this command actually returns *too* much -- it includes the open-bracket after the description and the first tag name -- we have to use a *second* command after the first 'cut' command, to trim a little further: cut -d'[' -f1

What *this* part is saying is 'Take the output from the cat and the first cut command, and then look for all of the open-bracket characters that may be there -- use the first found open-bracket character as a *divider* (delimiter) for that text, and return the *first* 'field' -- field #1 -- from that text.

In this case 'field #1' happens to be the description itself, without any closed-brackets (stripped out with the first cut command), and without any open-brackets (stripped out with the *second* cut command), and focused on just the description part itself.

Unfortunately we're still picking up the incidental *spaces* at the beginning and end of each line, so if we wanted to be *really* fastidious we might add extra commands to do just that -- appending 'cut -c2- | rev | cut -c2- | rev', perhaps, as a way to do that. (The command says 'Cut from character #2 onward, then *reverse* the entire line to be *backwards*, and cut from the second character onwards of *that* (the actual *last* character), then reverse the line back to normal.')


Day-by-day

In my initial post I outlined a particular *protocol* for this implementation of a to-do list, that of *copying* yesterday's to-do file, to make a copy of it for *today*, for editing. For today's date this would be: cp 210316_to-do 210317_to-do

One can then edit for *today's* date while leaving all past versions intact, for historical archiving. If one ever needs to *move* a file, without copying, or *rename* a file, the 'move' command is used for those functions, as with: mv ~/storage/downloads/incomingfile.txt ~

This reads as 'In the home folder, in the storage folder, in the downloads folder there is a file called 'incomingfile.txt' -- take that file and *move* it -- don't *copy* it -- to the home directory.'

To *rename* a file -- if I made a mistake and first did an incorrect 'copy' command: cp 210316_to-do 210318_to-do

...I could then use the 'move' command to *rename* the new file that I incorrectly named: mv 210318_to-do 210317_to-do


Life raft

For *any* given command, help is always available -- just issue the command with the '-h' or '--help' flag following it, like this: mv --help


Archiving

I'll end with the topic of *zipping* folders and files into a compressed *zip* file -- I'd suggest installing 'zip', 'unzip', and 'p7zip' -- pkg install zip unzip p7zip

These commands are handy for handling zip files, and they all work in slightly different ways, with '7z' being the most powerful and arguably easiest to use.

To *zip* a folder, files, or combination of folders and files, just *add* those items in your '7z' command: 7z a 210317_downloads.zip ~/storage/downloads

To *list* the items in an archive try: unzip -l archivename.zip | more

To *unzip* items from an archive, try: unzip archivename.zip
#15177426
UPDATE:

You may want to try 'dte' ('pkg install dte', or 'apt install dte', without the quotes), which is better than the 'nano' text editor in that it has regular desktop-type text editor keybindings, like CTRL-X for 'cut', CTRL-C for 'copy', CTRL-V for 'paste', and CTRL-Q for 'quit'. It also supports multiple tabs, for multiple documents being open at the same time, as in gedit or pluma (on Linux).

I've found 'Total Commander' to be a superior file manager on the Android side of things, and there's a good shortcut for getting files in and out of the Termux Ubuntu installation, if you're running that.

(If you're running plain Termux then the key linked directory is /storage/downloads, and is already easy to get to, but the Termux Ubuntu directory is further 'in'. In Total Commander one can use the 'User-defined location' item from the default 'home' layout to specify '/data/data/com.termux/files/home/ubuntu-fs/root' as a pre-defined 'drive' at the top of the 'home' listing, after the default 'Internal shared storage', and any external 'SD card' that you may have inside the phone.)

The point of this 'linked' directory is to *transfer* files to and from your phone, using wifi -- try 'WiFi FTP Server', at https://wifi-ftp-server.en.uptodown.com/android.

I recently did some Sunflow renders, not actually on the smartphone, but easily done that way, in the Termux Ubuntu environment, using OpenJDK (Java), especially while on-the-road.

https://postimg.cc/gallery/Bq5fsZk


Having that ubuntu-fs/root directory readily available on the Android side, through Total Commander, means easy full-image viewing in Android, though rough previews are always available on the command line in Termux using 'chafa'.
#15177427
@ckaihatsu

I can't stand using nano. I simply stick with using the vi editor myself. Vi is a great editor as long as you take the time to learn it and practice with it.
#15177435
Politics_Observer wrote:
@ckaihatsu

I can't stand using nano. I simply stick with using the vi editor myself. Vi is a great editor as long as you take the time to learn it and practice with it.



Yeah, I've heard good things about it, and I know some people swear by it.

Obviously I come from the Linux platform, so I'm used to using pluma, with those conventional keybindings.

But I've actually moved away from using the smartphone actively, in favor of doing all of my stuff on the regular Linux desktop, and then 'pushing' content, like my daily to-do text file, to the smartphone (Termux Ubuntu) for *passive* viewing only. So that makes vi / nano / dte moot, anyway.
#15177964
Another option for people wanting to learn various operating systems is to install a type 2 hypervisor either on their Linux or Windows systems called Virtual Box. Virtual Box using virtualization technology where you can run multiple systems off one system hardware.

You can install various Linux distributions but beware that that if you plan to install multiple virtual machines on your system using the type 2 hypervisor Virtual Box, then your system hardware will in turn need more RAM memory and a fast CPU with a lot of cores.

So, if somebody wanted to build a virtual workstation then they would need to buy a lot of RAM and a very fast CPU with a lot of cores. The average system can handle one or two virtual machines running on it. However, if you start running too many virtual machines using Virtual Box without the pre-requsite CPU and RAM memory, you will run into problems. Here is a link to the type 2 hypervisor Virtual Box.

https://www.virtualbox.org/

Aside from hypervisors, if I haven't mentioned it already, for Windows systems, it's important to keep your Windows Registry cleaned up. When you install and then un-install applications on Windows systems, after the un-install, it leaves behind a lot of entries in your Windows Registry that clogs it up. This can slow down your system. So CCleaner is a good tool to download and use to clean out your Windows Registry so that it will help optimize the performance of your Windows system.

https://www.ccleaner.com/
#15178003
You need to be really careful when you download a free program to your system because unwanted bundled software is way more aggressive than malware. It is not uncommon to come across software that bundles spyware, adware or other forms of malware. My computer got infected with a virus from a Chrome app recently and I had to install Avira to get rid of it, which was actually a safe antivirus program without bundled malware.

Registry Cleaner is promoted by a dubious website that is made to seem legitimate and official. Once downloaded and installed, this registry cleaner/system optimizer runs the "EpizyCleanup" process in Task Manager, which is, in fact, the Trojan.Clicker process performing click fraud. This malicious program commits click fraud in an automated way. It can be used to click ads to generate revenue or drive up the costs of competitors' advertising campaigns. Making profits by fraudulently clicking ads in PPC (Pay-per-click) advertising or draining advertising budgets of competitors by increasing ad costs is illegal. Furthermore, publishers can use tools such as Trojan.Clicker to click website ads, thus making certain sites more attractive for others looking to place online ads. Click fraud is a big problem in PPC advertising business and tools such as Trojan.Clicker are used only for illegal purposes. Therefore, you should remove this malware, which is disguised as Registry Cleaner.
https://www.pcrisk.com/removal-guides/1 ... aner-virus
#15178006
@ThirdTerm

I hadn't had any problems with Ccleaner's website or Virtual Box. However, Ccleaner does install some extra software like a web browser of some kind that I don't want. I went ahead and uninstalled some the extra software I didn't want which is pretty easy to do. Virtual Box didn't have any extra software installs. Currently I run Windows Defender anti-malware, Cylance next generation anti-malware scanner and I give the occasional scan using the free version of Malwarebytes. It's important to have a next generation anti-malware scanner running on your system due to the fact that a lot of malware that will infect your system is custom built malware which can evade the traditional signature based anti-malware scanners.

In addition, I have Ossec Host Intrusion Detection System running on my Windows System. The Ossec server I use is a Linux home server I made and interacts with my Windows system. I also have my firewall rules set to whitelist only authorized outbound connections. So, if for some reason my malware scanners or Host Intrusion Detection System doesn't pick up on any malware installed on my system the firewall will at least block outbound connections that some malware might seek to make such as backdoors for example.

I keep my Linux server hardened with firewall rules, ClamAV and Sophos anti-malware scanners as well as using the Lynis security auditing tool. I also use Ossec on my Linux server as well obviously though another choice for a Host Intrusion Detection System on a Linux box is Tripwire.
#15178009
@ThirdTerm

The malware you really have to watch out for is the malware that infects your firmware (which is in your BIOS chip) and rootkits that seek to hide their presence. Those are tough to remove and in the case of malware that infects your firmware, you will have to replace your BIOS chip.
#15182677
Bitdefender traditional signature based anti-malware scanner for mobile smart phones works pretty good. I've had Bitdefender as one of my anti-malware scanners for my smart phone for a long time. But I just now decided to test out some of the anti-theft features on the smart phone. So, I logged into my account online and tested the alert sound on it and it worked pretty good where gives an alert sound for 5 minutes. Plus, you can use some of it's anti-theft features to find the current location of your smart phone if it is currently on the internet. You can also lock up your smart phone too but I didn't test that feature because I was afraid I might not be able to unlock it. It also has remote wipe to delete all your data on your smart phone in the event of theft. So, it's an excellent application for mobile smartphone security.

I also run the mobile smart phone version of Cylance Next Generation Anti-malware scanner on my smart phone in addition to Bitdefender. This is so that I will be more likely to detect and stop custom built malware that is designed to evade and remain undetected by the more traditional signature based anti-malware scanners like BitDefender. So, both of those anti-malware scanners working together, along with the NoRoot Firewall app and mobile smartphone version of the VPN service called ExpressVPN and encrypting my internal storage and micro SD and the use of a biometric (fingerprint is preferable over facial recognition) with a tough to crack unlock password to unlock my smartphone helps to bring some good security to my mobile smartphone. Even if it is lost or stolen.

A good open source messenger app to use, especially if you take the time to explore all of it's other security features is the messenger app Signal which you can video chat and message on it as well. It has end to end encryption with excellent encryption and Perfect Forward Secrecy that is built into the Signal protocol that the messenger app uses. You can mobile smart phone too for more secure messaging or video chatting. Plus they don't sell your information or store any of your sensitive information on any of their servers given it's open source and that Signal is non-profit. Here is a link to Signal's website: https://signal.org/
#15186445
Several other good software products for creating a backup image of your current system is using Acronis True Image (which this costs money) for your personal home computer Windows system https://www.acronis.com/en-us/products/true-image/ or you could use Clonezilla which can create a backup image for your Linux system and is free and open source: https://clonezilla.org/ .

Another thing to bear in mind is that one can create a Windows Recovery USB Flash Thumb drive in the event your Windows system won't boot for whatever various reasons. Perhaps the Master Boot Record needs to be repaired for example. Windows Recovery Environment USB flash thumb drive can be made from your Windows operating system prior to any future problems.

Moreover, you can save restore points on Windows systems at various times in history to go back to the point in history to where your Windows systems didn't have any problems or issues (this is in case you might have data corruption for example in your system). But you have to save these restore points yourself. It won't do it automatically for you. This is similar to macOS's Time Machine.

To test whether your Dynamic Random Access Memory is still good on your motherboard, you can run the Memtest86. The particular version I have tests both static random access memory and dynamic random access memory. The static tests the L1, L2, L3 static random access memory of the CPU processor in addition to the dynamic random access memory that you have installed on your motherboard. Here is the link which includes a free version: https://www.memtest86.com/
#15188530
For those of you who are interested, another website not listed in this thread at all with a lot of excellent free Windows operating system tools is this URL here:

https://live.sysinternals.com/

For example, you could download "Autoruns.exe" and get extremely detailed information from the Windows Registry and Windows Services on all the programs that could be automatically starting up on your Windows system. Here is a screenshot from my computer running one of the utilities you can download from the above link called "Autorun.exe:"

Image

You could probably spend a considerable amount of time downloading from this website the various tools and exploring them on your Windows environment.

Edit:

Here is a video about System Internals and Malware Hunting from YouTube:

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