Key Rasmussen Polls - Page 70 - Politics Forum.org | PoFo

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By Doug64
#15183467
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-seven percent (37%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending July 22, 2021. This week’s finding is down two points from a week ago. Fifty-five percent (55%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, up one point from a week ago. A year ago at this time, 26% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 67% said it was on the wrong track.

    The Rasmussen Reports Immigration Index for the week of July 18-22, 2021, increased to 89.5, up from 89.3 two weeks earlier. The Immigration Index has been under the baseline in every survey since Election Day last year, and reached a record low of 82.3 in late March. The index is now 16 points below where it was the week of October 22, indicating voters are looking for tighter immigration control from President Joe Biden’s administration.

    Fourteen percent (14%) of American Adults rate media coverage of the ongoing coronavirus crisis excellent, and another 28% rate the media’s COVID-19 coverage good. That’s a decline in approval from December, when 50% rated the media’s coverage of the pandemic excellent or good. The number who say the media is doing a poor job remained the same at 29%. The number of Americans who think the media are exaggerating the COVID-19 threat has increased since December, when 38% thought the media were exaggerating the threat and 52% did not. Now, the numbers are dead even – 44% believe the media are exaggerating the coronavirus threat and the same percentage don’t think so, while 12% are not sure. More than a third of Americans (38%) think the media aren’t reporting accurately about the safety and effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines, while 46% believe the media’s reporting about vaccines is accurate. Another 16% are not sure.

    Seventy percent (70%) of Likely U.S. Voters say they have received a COVID-19 vaccination. Twenty-five percent (25%) have not. Those numbers are basically unchanged since earlier this month. Among voters who have not yet been vaccinated, 53% say they don’t plan to get a COVID-19 vaccination in the future, while 20% say they do expect to get the vaccine and 27% are not sure. Seventy-nine percent (79%) of unvaccinated voters are concerned about the safety of COVID-19 vaccines, including 52% who are Very Concerned.

    Thirty-eight percent (38%) of American Adults believe U.S. athletes who aren’t vaccinated against COVID-19 should be made to get the vaccine. Forty-five percent (45%) don’t think the athletes should be forced to get vaccinated. Seventeen percent (17%) are not sure. Originally scheduled for 2020, the Tokyo Olympics were delayed a year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. More than 100 members of the U.S. team reportedly have not been vaccinated, and six U.S. athletes have tested positive for the coronavirus. Interest in the Olympics has declined since the 2016 games in Rio de Janeiro. Forty-eight percent (48%) of Americans Adults say they’re likely to watch a large part of the Summer Olympics on television, including 20% who say it’s Very Likely they’ll watch a lot of the Olympics. That’s down from 55% and 26%, respectively, in 2016.

    Forty percent (40%) of American Adults say the crisis of opioid drugs like heroin and painkillers has gotten worse in the past year. Just 11% think the crisis has gotten better in the last year, while 31% say the opioid problem is about the same. Eighteen percent (18%) are not sure. Those numbers are essentially the same as in August 2019. Twenty percent (20%) of Americans think the Biden administration is doing enough to fight the problem of opioid drugs, but more than twice as many (44%) believe the administration is not doing enough. Thirty-six percent (36%) are not sure. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported earlier this month that U.S. deaths from drug overdoses hit a record high of more than 93,000 in 2020. That was a 29% increase over 2019, according to the CDC, and most of those overdose deaths – nearly 70,000 – involved opioid drugs.

    Twenty-one percent (21%) voters rate Biden as excellent on his handling of economic issues and another 21% rate his handling of the economy as good. Twelve percent (12%) say Biden is doing a fair job on the economy, but 43% rate Biden’s handling of economic issues as poor. Those numbers haven’t changed much since April, when 23% of voters rated Biden excellent on economic issues. Voter give Biden worse marks on his handling of crime and law enforcement issues – just 15% say he’s doing an excellent job, 19% rate him good on his handling of crime, with 14% saying he’s doing a fair job and 48% rating him poor. Eighty-five percent (85%) of voters say they’re concerned about the problem of violent crime in America, including 60% who are Very Concerned about the crime problem. By comparison, 79% of voters say they’re concerned about inflation, including 49% who are Very Concerned.

    Seventeen percent (17%) of Likely U.S. Voters rate the way Congress is doing its job as good or excellent. Fifty-four percent (54%) think Congress is doing a poor job. Those numbers are worse than in April, when 21% gave Congress excellent or good ratings. Historically, positive ratings for Congress have only reached 25% once (in February 2017) in regular surveying by Rasmussen Reports since 2007. Poor findings routinely ran in the 60s and 70s from 2011 through 2014. Just 29% of voters think Congress is likely to seriously address the most important problems facing our nation. Sixty-eight percent (66%) consider that unlikely. These findings includes only seven percent (7%) who feel Congress is Very Likely to tackle the big issues and 33% who say it’s Not At All Likely to do so. Those numbers haven’t changed much since October 2019.

    And for Biden's job approval numbers over the past week. This might be the first time he's been below 50% for two weeks in a row:

    • Strongly Approve: 28% (-2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 41% (+3)
    • Total Approve: 47% (-3)
    • Total Disapprove: 51% (+3)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 29% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 49%
    • Total Disapprove: 49%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 32%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 50%
    • Total Disapprove: 48%

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 25% (-2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 47%
    • Total Approve: 42% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 58% (+1)

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 27% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 47% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 43% (-2)
    • Total Disapprove: 57% (+2)

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 31%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 47% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 52%

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 30% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 39% (+3)
    • Total Approve: 49% (-2)
    • Total Disapprove: 50% (+2)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 30% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 37% (+2)
    • Total Approve: 51% (-2)
    • Total Disapprove: 48% (+2)

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 36%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 30% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 56% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 42%
By Doug64
#15184550
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-two percent (32%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending July 29, 2021. This week’s finding is down five points from a week ago. This has been the lowest finding since President Biden's inauguration on January 20. Fifty-nine percent (59%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, up four points from a week ago. A year ago at this time, 26% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 69% said it was on the wrong track.

    Forty-five percent (45%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe people should be required to wear masks in public places, even if they’ve been vaccinated against COVID-19. Forty-six percent (46%) disagree, and nine percent (9%) are not sure. Sixty-six percent (66%) of Democrats think people should be required to wear masks in public places, even if they’ve been vaccinated against COVID-19, but that opinion is shared by only 26% of Republicans and 39% of voters not affiliated with either major party. Majorities of Republicans (66%) and unaffiliated voters (52%) are against requiring masks in public for vaccinated people, a view shared by 25% of Democrats. President Joe Biden said Friday that Americans can “in all probability” expect to face more restrictions due to an increase in COVID-19 cases caused by the Delta variant. The White House denied that it is planning a federal mandate to require Americans to get vaccinated against COVID-19, but many Democratic voters favor such a mandate. Sixty-three percent (63%) of Democrats say people should be required to get vaccinated against COVID-19, even if they’ve already had the disease. Only 24% of Republicans and 35% of unaffiliated voters agree.

    Fifty-nine percent (59%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe the congressional investigation of the January 6 riot is important, including 42% who consider it Very Important. Nineteen percent (19%) think the investigation is Not Very Important and 16% say it’s Not At All Important. Chaired by Democratic Rep. Bennie Thompson of Mississippi, the select committee to investigate the riot at the Capitol by supporters of former President Donald Trump began hearings last week. Seventy-two percent (72%) of voters say they have closely followed news coverage of the hearings, including 37% who have followed news about the hearings Very Closely. Trump supporters rioted at the U.S. Capitol on January 6 – when Congress was meeting to certify the results of last year’s presidential election – because they believed President Joe Biden was not legitimately elected. Thirty-six percent (36%) of voters still don’t think Biden won last year’s election fairly. Fifty-two percent (52%) of voters think Biden did win fairly, and 12% are not sure.

    Sixty percent (60%) of Likely U.S. Voters say the country has become more divided since last year’s election. Only 13% think the country is more united than it was before the election, while 24% believe the level of division is about the same. Those numbers haven’t changed much since January. Voters overwhelmingly see social media as a divisive influence. Seventy-four percent (74%) think sites like Facebook and Twitter tend to divide Americans, while only eight percent (8%) believe social media help unite Americans. Another 10% think social media sites don’t have much impact. Seventy-one percent (71%) of voters say Americans are less tolerant of each other’s political opinions than they were in the past. Just 11% believe Americans are more tolerant of political disagreement, and 13% say the level of tolerance is about the same.

    Ninety percent (90%) of Likely U.S. Voters think it is important to prevent cheating in elections, including 79% who say it’s Very Important. Only seven percent (7%) of voters believe it’s not important to prevent election cheating. Seventy-four percent (74%) of voters say requiring photo ID to vote is a reasonable measure to protect the integrity of elections. Only 19% disagree. Election integrity has become an issue in this year’s Virginia gubernatorial campaign. When it was announced the GOP candidate Glenn Youngkin would speak at this weekend’s election integrity rally in Lynchburg, Democratic candidate Terry McAuliffe accused Youngkin of promoting a “dangerous, deadly conspiracy theory.” Youngkin has promised to restore Virginia’s voter identification requirement, which was repealed by the state’s general assembly last year. Not requiring voter ID “undermines the integrity of our elections and makes it easier to cheat,” Youngkin’s spokesman said. Forty-nine percent (49%) of Likely U.S. Voters agree it is a “dangerous conspiracy theory” to think cheating affected the outcome of last year’s presidential election, but 36% disagree, while 14% are not sure. However, 60% of voters agree that opponents of requiring a photo ID to vote just want to make it easy to cheat in elections, including 48% who Strongly Agree. Twenty-nine percent (29%) disagree, including 19% who Strongly Disagree. Eleven percent (11%) are not sure.

    Seventy percent (70%) of Likely U.S. Voters are confident in the safety and effectiveness of the COVID-19 vaccine, including 42% who are Very Confident. Those numbers have increased from 67% and 34%, respectively, since March. Twenty-six percent (26%) of voters now say they are not confident that the vaccine is safe and effective, including 15% who are Not At All Confident. Those numbers are about the same as in the March survey. Forty percent (40%) of voters believe Americans will be required to wear masks in public places for less than six months. However, 50% think mask mandates will continue longer, including 23% who believe Americans will be required to wear masks in public for 18 months or more. Ten percent (10%) are not sure. In dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic, 52% of voters believe protecting public health is more important than protecting individual liberty. Forty percent (40%) disagree, and say protecting liberty is more important.

    Seventy-three percent (73%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe Cuomo should resign after an investigation found he sexually harassed women in the workplace. Thirteen percent (13%) say the New York governor should not resign, and 14% are not sure. President Joe Biden said Cuomo, a fellow Democrat, should resign after New York Attorney General Letitia James issued the final report of an investigation that found Cuomo harassed 11 different women. Cuomo has vehemently defended himself, and only 16% of voters believe it is Very Likely that the governor will actually resign, while another 21% say it’s Somewhat Likely he will resign. Fifty-two percent (52%) don’t think it is likely Cuomo will resign, including 18% who say it’s Not At All Likely. Another 11% are not sure. If Cuomo refuses to resign, 62% of voters believe it’s likely the New York state legislature will impeach the governor and remove him from office, including 31% who say impeachment is Very Likely. Thirty percent (30%) don’t think Cuomo is likely to be impeached and removed from office.

    Twenty-eight percent (28%) of American Adults believe Americans have true freedom of speech today. Sixty-five percent (65%) say instead that Americans have to be careful not to say something politically incorrect to avoid getting in trouble. These findings have changed little in surveys for the past several years. In the latest “cancel culture” incident, Grammy award-winning rapper DaBaby was dropped from several concert appearances after making homophobic remarks during a performance. That prompted singer Miley Cyrus to come to the rapper’s defense on Instagram, criticizing the “hate & anger” that is “the nucleus of cancel culture,” and adding: “It’s easier to cancel someone than to find forgiveness and compassion in ourselves or take the time to change hearts and minds.” Sixty-five percent (65%) of Americans say political correctness is a problem in the country today. Only 22% disagree. Thirteen percent (13%) are not sure. Ten years ago, 79% considered political correctness a problem.

    And for Biden's job approval numbers over the past week:

    • Strongly Approve: 29% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 42% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 48% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 51%

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 29%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 49%
    • Total Disapprove: 50% (+1)

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 32%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 50%
    • Total Disapprove: 48%

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 25%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 49% (+2)
    • Total Approve: 39% (-3)
    • Total Disapprove: 61% (+3)

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 26% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 47%
    • Total Approve: 42% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 58% (+1)

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 31%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43%
    • Total Approve: 47%
    • Total Disapprove: 53% (+1)

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 30%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 38% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 50% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 50%

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 30%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 37%
    • Total Approve: 50% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 49% (+1)

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 35% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 30%
    • Total Approve: 56%
    • Total Disapprove: 43% (+1)
By Doug64
#15185280
I'm actually able to post early this week! Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-five percent (35%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending August 5, 2021. This week’s finding is up three points from a week ago. Fifty-eight percent (58%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, down one point from a week ago. A year ago at this time, 28% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 66% said it was on the wrong track.

    The Rasmussen Reports Immigration Index for the week of August 1-5, 2021, decreased to 88.2, down from 89.5 two weeks earlier. The Immigration Index has been under the baseline in every survey since Election Day last year, and reached a record low of 82.3 in late March. The index is now more than 17 points below where it was the week of October 22, indicating voters are looking for tighter immigration control from President Joe Biden’s administration.

    Forty-four percent (44%) of American Adults believe people should be required to show proof they have been vaccinated against COVID-19 before going to indoor public places like restaurants, gyms and theaters. Forty-seven percent (47%) are against such a requirement. New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced last week that, starting in September, the city will require proof of COVID-19 vaccination to enter certain indoor businesses — including all indoor restaurants, entertainment venues and gyms. Sixty-five percent (65%) of Democrats think proof of COVID-19 vaccination should be required in public places, but only 29% of Republicans and 36% of those unaffiliated with either major party agree. Most Republicans (65%) and unaffiliateds (54%) are against requiring proof of COVID-19 vaccination, as are 25% of Democrats. Only 30% of Americans believe the country is now winning the war against the coronavirus, while a majority (51%) approve of the recent Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommendation that people “wear a mask indoors in public” to “maximize protection from the Delta variant” of COVID-19, even if they’re already vaccinated.

    Sixty-three percent (63%) of Likely U.S. Voters disagree with the Missouri Democrat’s quote from a CBS News interview last week: “Defunding the police has to happen, we need to defund the police and put that money into social safety nets.” That includes 51% who Strongly Disagree with Bush’s statement. Thirty-one percent (31%) agree with Bush on defunding the police, including 12% who Strongly Agree. By contrast, 57% of voters agree, including 40% who Strongly Agree, with a quote from Gaston County, North Carolina, Sheriff Alan Cloninger: “Some of the new Democrats in Washington attack and degrade all law enforcement officers who risk their lives every day to protect the people.” A Democrat who has served 16 years as sheriff, Cloninger announced his retirement last week and said he was leaving the Democratic Party. Thirty-one percent (31%) disagree with the quote from Cloninger, including 21% who Strongly Disagree. Eleven percent (11%) are not sure. Seventy-one percent (71%) of voters rate the performance of their local police as excellent or good, while 25% rate their local police as doing a fair or poor job. More than two-thirds (68%) don’t think most police officers are racist, but 18% think they are.

    Thirteen percent (13%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe most politicians keep their campaign promises. Sixty-nine percent (69%) say they do not. Eighteen percent (18%) are undecided. Thirty percent (30%) of voters say Biden has kept his campaign promises more than most presidents. Forty-one percent (41%) say he’s kept his promises less than most. Twenty-five percent (25%) rate his performance about the same as other presidents. Voters had a higher opinion of former President Donald Trump in this regard. In August 2020, 45% said Trump had kept his campaign promises more than most presidents.

    Fifty-one percent (51%) of Likely U.S. Voters agree with Louisiana Sen. John Kennedy’s statement: “They told us it was a real infrastructure bill. It’s not. Only 23% of the bill is real infrastructure. The rest is Green New Deal and welfare. They told us the bill was paid for. It isn’t. We’re going to have to borrow maybe up to $400 billion to pay for it.” That includes 36% who Strongly Agree with Kennedy. Forty-four percent (44%) of voters disagree with Kennedy’s quote, including 19% who Strongly Disagree. Another 15% are not sure. Nineteen GOP senators voted for the $1.2 trillion bill Tuesday. Kennedy voted against it, after telling Laura Ingraham on Fox News, “I realized pretty quickly that if you look up ‘stupid stuff’ in the dictionary, there’s a picture of this bill.” Overall, 45% of Likely Voters say they support the infrastructure bill, while 41% are opposed, and 14% are not sure. About two-thirds of Democratic voters (66%) support the bill, while 63% of Republicans oppose it. Voters not affiliated with either major party are about evenly divided, with 42% supporting the infrastructure bill, 40% opposed, and 18% not sure.

    Forty percent (40%) of American Adults think it is appropriate for young people to have a cell phone between ages 11 and 14. Another 31% think it’s more appropriate for children to wait until 15 or 16 to first get a smartphone. Thirteen percent (13%) think it’s more appropriate to wait until they are older than 16, while just four percent (8%) think it’s appropriate for kids to have a cell phone at 10 or younger. But regardless of age, 82% of adults think young people spend too much time on their cell phones. Just eight percent (8%) do not. These finding haven’t changed much since we asked the same questions in 2017. The consensus about the appropriate age for children to get a cell phone is generally solid across demographic categories, for adults both with and without minor children at home. And almost everybody agrees that young people spend too much time on their phones.

    Thirty percent (30%) of American Adults believe the school year should begin in August as it does in many states. Fifty-four percent (54%) say school shouldn’t begin until after Labor Day. Fourteen percent (15%) are undecided. Only 23% favor extending the school year to a 12-month calendar. Sixty-five percent (65%) are opposed. Twelve percent (12%) are not sure. Those findings are virtually unchanged from 2019. While opposition to 12 months of school has been fairly consistent over the years, support for starting school after Labor Day has run from 50% to 61% in surveys since 2009. What has changed is that 34% of adults with children living at home now favor an August start for the school year, more than those without children (28%). Two years ago, the situation was reversed, as adults with children at home were more in favor of starting school after Labor Day than those without kids.

    Economic confidence fell to 106.6 in this month’s Rasmussen Reports Economic Index, down more than two points from July, the third consecutive monthly decline. Enthusiasm about the economy surged under former President Trump, reaching as high as 147.8 in January 2020 before tumbling after the coronavirus lockdown threw Americans out of work and closed many businesses. By November, it had recovered to 126.4, but dropped sharply in the three months after President Biden was elected. The index fell to 97.8 in February before beginning a three-month rebound that took the index to 123.7 in May, but has declined again the past three months. Thirty-three percent (33%) of American Adults rate the economy as good or excellent this month, down one point from last month and nine points below the 42% mark in November. The number who rate the economy as poor increase to 32%, up three points from July. Twenty-five percent (25%) now think the economy is getting better, down five points from last month. Forty-nine percent (49%) expect a worsening economy, up three points from last month, but still seven points lower than in February. Twenty percent (20%) now see things staying about the same, up two points from last month.

    And for Biden's job approval numbers over the past week, this may be the first time that Biden has been underwater for three weeks in a row:

    • Strongly Approve: 27% (-2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 48%
    • Total Disapprove: 51%

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 29%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 41% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 48% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 50%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 32%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 50%
    • Total Disapprove: 48%

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 27% (+2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 47% (-2)
    • Total Approve: 43% (+4)
    • Total Disapprove: 55% (-6)

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 26%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 48% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 42%
    • Total Disapprove: 58%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 31%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43%
    • Total Approve: 47%
    • Total Disapprove: 53%

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 31% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 38%
    • Total Approve: 49% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 51% (+1)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 30%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 37%
    • Total Approve: 50%
    • Total Disapprove: 49%

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 35%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 30%
    • Total Approve: 56%
    • Total Disapprove: 43%
By Doug64
#15186813
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-four percent (34%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending August 12, 2021. This week’s finding is down one point from a week ago. Sixty percent (60%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, up two points from a week ago. A year ago at this time, 30% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 65% said it was on the wrong track.

    Eighty-one percent (81%) of American Adults would oppose a law in their state that says high school students do not need to be proficient in reading, writing and mathematics to graduate. Only 12% favor such a law in their state. Oregon Gov. Kate Brown signed a bill last month with that drops the requirement that high school students prove proficiency in reading, writing or math before graduation. A spokesman for the governor said suspending proficiency requirements will benefit the state’s “Black, Latino, Latina, Latinx, Indigenous, Asian, Pacific Islander, Tribal, and students of color.” Most Americans aren’t buying that explanation. Seventy-five percent (75%) say dropping proficiency requirements will be bad for Oregon’s “Black, Latino, Latina, Latinx, Indigenous, Asian, Pacific Islander, Tribal, and students of color.” Only seven percent (7%) think dropping the requirements will be good for those students, while another nine percent (9%) think it will make no difference. Eighty percent (80%) of Americans believe students who earn a high school diploma without proficiency in reading, writing and mathematics will find it harder to succeed in the workplace or in college.

    Seventy percent (70%) of Likely U.S. Voters think violent crime is “out of control.” Just 22% disagree. Ninety percent (90%) of voters are concerned about the recent increase in violent crime, including 64% who are Very Concerned. Only 10% are not concerned. The elimination of cash bail requirements in some jurisdictions is among the policies voters blame most for the problem. Seventy-three percent (73%) of voters say letting accused violent criminals out of jail without bail while they wait for trial increases violent crime. Fourteen percent (14%) disagree and 13% are not sure. The survey also found: Seventy percent (70%) of voters say district attorneys refusing to prosecute accused criminals contributes to rising violent crime. Sixty-one percent (61%) believe early release of criminals from prison contributes to violent crime. Fifty-six percent (56%) think prohibiting police from a “stop and frisk” of a suspect believed to be armed contributes to violent crime. Fifty-two percent (52%) believe prohibiting police from engaging in pursuits contributes to violent crime.

    Fifty-one percent (51%) of Likely U.S. Voters say Biden is more to blame for the Taliban taking over Afghanistan, while 38% say former President Trump is more to blame. Fifteen percent (15%) are not sure. Voters give Biden low marks for his handling of national security issues, with only 38% rating him excellent or good, while 48% say his handling of national security has been poor. Fifty-nine percent (59%) of voters believe the Taliban takeover of Afghanistan makes the threat of terrorism against the United States worse. Just nine percent (9%) think the threat of terrorism is now better, while 26% say the Taliban taking over Afghanistan doesn’t make much difference in terms of the danger of terrorism to the U.S.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that, if the next presidential election were held today, 37% of Likely U.S. Voters would vote for Biden. Forty-three percent (43%) would vote for former President Donald Trump, and 14% say they would vote for some other candidate. Among voters who say they voted for Biden in last year’s election, 12% now say they regret their vote. By comparison, only two percent (2%) of Trump voters now regret their vote. If a rematch of the 2020 election were held now, Trump would win, because only 79% of Biden voters say they would vote for him again and seven percent (7%) would switch their vote to Trump. By comparison, 81% of Trump’s 2020 voters would vote for him again and just two percent (2%) would switch to Biden. Ten percent (10%) of Biden’s 2020 voters would vote for some other candidate, while 12% of those who voted for Trump in 2020 would vote for some other candidate. Of those who say they voted for some other candidate last year, 21% would vote for Trump if the next election were held now, while just seven percent (7%) say they’d vote for Biden.

    Forty-three percent (43%) of Likely U.S. Voters think Harris is qualified to assume the duties of the presidency, including 29% who think she is Very Qualified. That’s down from April, when 49% said Harris was qualified to become president. Now, 55% say Harris is not qualified to assume the duties of the presidency, including 47% who say she is Not At All Qualified. Most voters don’t consider Harris’s qualification to become president a moot point. Fifty-one percent (51%) think it is likely President Biden will leave office and be replaced by Harris before the 2024 election, including 29% who say it’s Very Likely. Thirty-seven percent (37%) don’t believe it’s likely Biden will be replaced by Harris before 2024, including 15% who say it is Not At All Likely. Eleven percent (11%) are not sure. Overall, 41% of voters have a favorable impression of Harris, including 24% who have a Very Favorable view of the vice president. Fifty-six percent (56%) have an unfavorable impression of Harris, including 47% whose impression of her is Very Unfavorable. That represents a decline in the vice president’s favorability since April, when 46% had a favorable impression of Harris.

    Forty-one percent (41%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe it is fair to say that neither party in Congress is the party of the American people. That’s down from 47% two years ago. Thirty-eight percent (38%) disagree, while 21% are undecided. Voters not affiliated with either of the major parties (53%) are more likely than Democrats (38%) and Republicans (37%) to agree that neither party in Congress represents the American people. Among all voters, only 27% think the average Democrat in Congress is about the same as them in political terms. Twenty-four percent (24%) feel that way politically about the average Republican in Congress. Forty-six percent (46%) of Democratic voters say the average Democrat in Congress is about the same as them in political terms, while just 31% of Republican voters feel that way about the average Republican in Congress.

    Thirty-nine percent (39%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe Biden is really doing the job of president – that’s down from 47% in March. A majority of voter (51%) now say others are making decisions for Biden behind the scenes. Another 10% are not sure. Just 34% of voters say they are Very Confident that Biden is physically and mentally up to the job of being President of the United States. Another 14% say they are Somewhat Confident in Biden’s capability, while 10% are Not Very Confident and 40% are Not At All Confident. Confidence in Biden’s capability to perform his duties has declined since March. Seventy-two percent (72%) of Democrats think Biden is really doing the job of president, but that belief is shared by only 14% of Republicans and 27% of voters not affiliated with either major party. More than three-quarters (77%) of Republican voters believe others are making decisions for Biden behind the scenes, a view shared by 22% of Democrats and 55% of unaffiliated voters.

    And for Biden's job approval numbers over the past week, still underwater and probably going to be for the foreseeable future:

    • Strongly Approve: 27%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 45% (+2)
    • Total Approve: 46% (-2)
    • Total Disapprove: 53% (+2)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 28% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 42% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 48%
    • Total Disapprove: 51% (+1)

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 31% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 50%
    • Total Disapprove: 48%

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 25% (-2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 47%
    • Total Approve: 41% (-2)
    • Total Disapprove: 57% (+2)

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 26%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 47% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 41% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 58%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 30% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43%
    • Total Approve: 47%
    • Total Disapprove: 53%

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 32% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 39% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 49%
    • Total Disapprove: 51%

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 31% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 38% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 49% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 50% (+1)

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 35%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 31% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 56%
    • Total Disapprove: 43%
By Doug64
#15187588
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-three percent (33%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending August 19, 2021. This week’s finding is down one point from a week ago. Sixty-two percent (62%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, up two points from a week ago. A year ago at this time, 30% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 65% said it was on the wrong track.

    The Rasmussen Reports Immigration Index for the week of August 15-19, 2021, decreased to 87.6, down from 88.2 two weeks earlier. The Immigration Index has been under the baseline in every survey since Election Day last year, and reached a record low of 82.3 in late March. The index is now more than 17 points below where it was the week of October 22, indicating voters are looking for tighter immigration control from President Joe Biden’s administration.

    Ninety-six (96%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe it is important that the U.S. government help American citizens get out of Afghanistan now that the Taliban has taken over, including 86% who say it is Very Important. Eighty-two percent (82%) think it is important that the U.S. government help Afghanistan refugees who want to escape the Taliban, including 50% who say it is Very Important. Fifteen percent (15%) don’t think it is important to help Afghanistan refugees. Of the 17,000 people evacuated from Kabul by Saturday, only 2,500 were Americans, according to U.S. officials. It is estimated that 7,500 or more American civilians are still in Afghanistan.

    Fifty-nine percent (59%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe the Biden administration is not doing enough to evacuate Americans from Afghanistan. Twenty-eight percent (28%) say the Biden administration is doing enough to rescue Americans. Thirteen percent (13%) are not sure. More than three-quarters of voters think it’s likely Americans in Afghanistan will become hostages. Seventy-six percent (76%) say it’s at least somewhat likely that Americans who remain in Afghanistan will be taken hostage by the Taliban, including 45% who say it is Very Likely. Only 14% don’t think it is likely the Taliban will take Americans hostage, while 10% are not sure. An overwhelming majority (78%) of voters say that if the Taliban takes Americans hostage in Afghanistan, the United States should use military force to rescue the hostages. Only nine percent (9%) disagree, while 12% are not sure.

    Fifty-one percent (51%) of Likely U.S. Voters say the United States today is not safer than it was before the 9/11 terrorist attacks. That’s up from 41% two years ago. Thirty-four percent (34%) now think the U.S. is safer than it was before the 9/11 attacks, down from 41% in 2019. Fourteen percent (14%) are not sure. In 2019, a majority (53%) of voters believed the United States and its allies were winning the War on Terror, but now just 32% think so, while 40% say the terrorists are winning, and 19% say neither is winning. Another nine percent (9%) are not sure. These numbers are similar to findings during President Obama’s second term, when as few as 25% believed the U.S. and its allies were winning the War on Terror. With President Joe Biden in the White House, Democrats (47%) are now more than twice as likely as Republicans (22%) or voters not affiliated with either major party (23%) to believe the United States and its allies are winning the War on Terror. Similarly, while 47% of Democrats think the United States is now safer than it was before the 9/11 attacks, only 25% of Republicans and 28% of unaffiliated voters agree.

    Thirty-four percent (34%) of Likely U.S. Voters trust what Biden administration officials are saying about the current situation in Afghanistan. Fifty-four percent (54%) don’t trust what administration officials are saying, while 11% are not sure. Sixty percent (60%) believe the current situation in Afghanistan is worse than Biden administration officials are saying, while just 11% think it’s better than officials say, and 25% believe the situation in Afghanistan is about the same as officials say. Voters express an almost identical level of distrust toward media coverage of Afghanistan since the Taliban takeover. Only 29% trust what the news media are reporting about the current situation in Afghanistan, while 53% don’t trust the media, and 19% are not sure. Fifty-seven percent (57%) believe the situation in Afghanistan is worst than the news media are reporting, while 11% say the situation is better and 26% think the situation is about the same as media coverage portrays it.

    Sixty-seven percent (67%) of American Adults believe racism is a serious problem in America today, including 41% who say it’s a Very Serious problem. Twenty-nine percent (29%) think racism isn’t a serious problem in America, including 11% who say it’s Not At All Serious. These findings are little changed since 2019. Forty-two percent (42%) believe Americans talk too much about race. That’s down from 45% two years ago, which was the highest finding since Rasmussen Reports first asked this question in 2014. Thirty-one percent (31%) say Americans don’t discuss race enough, while 18% view the level of discussion as about right. As in so many other issues in America, partisan politics influences opinions about race. Democrats (58%) are much more likely than Republicans (28%) or those not affiliated with either major party (34%) to say racism is a Very Serious problem in America today.

    Forty-four percent (44%) of American Adults have a favorable impression of Fauci, including 27% whose view of him is Very Favorable. Forty-two percent (42%) view Fauci unfavorably, including 29% whose opinion of him is Very Unfavorable. Fourteen percent (14%) are not sure. These findings represent an apparent decline since May, when 54% of Likely U.S. Voters expressed a favorable impression of Fauci, who as director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) has been the federal government’s most visible expert spokesman during the COVID-19 pandemic. Despite his declining favorability, Fauci’s advice still carries weight with the public. This week, Fauci told CNN that it will be next spring before “we could start getting back to a degree of normality, namely reassuming the things that we were hoping we could do – restaurants, theaters, that kind of thing." Fifty percent (50%) of Americans agree with Fauci’s recommendation of continuing restrictions until next spring, while 39% disagree and 11% are not sure.

    And for Biden's job approval numbers over the past week, still underwater and probably going to be for the foreseeable future (still not as bad as Trump's at this point, though):

    • Strongly Approve: 25% (-2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 46% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 46%
    • Total Disapprove: 53%

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 27% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 44% (+2)
    • Total Approve: 47% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 52% (+1)

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 31%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 49% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 49% (+1)

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 25%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 47%
    • Total Approve: 42% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 56% (-1)

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 26%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 47%
    • Total Approve: 41%
    • Total Disapprove: 58%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 30%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43%
    • Total Approve: 47%
    • Total Disapprove: 53%

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 29% (-3)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 49%
    • Total Disapprove: 50% (-1)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 31%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 39% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 49%
    • Total Disapprove: 50%

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 35%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 31%
    • Total Approve: 55% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 43%
By Doug64
#15188789
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-four percent (34%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending August 26, 2021. This week’s finding is up one point from a week ago. Sixty-one percent (61%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, down one point from a week ago. A year ago at this time, 31% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 63% said it was on the wrong track.

    Thirty-two percent (32%) of Likely U.S. Voters rate the Biden administration’s handling of the current situation in Afghanistan good or excellent, while 52% rate it poor. Fifty percent (50%) of voters say Biden’s determination to withdraw all U.S. military forces from Afghanistan by Tuesday’s deadline is a bad decision, while just 34% think it’s a good decision and another 16% are not sure. This marks a drastic decline in support for Biden’s Afghanistan policy. In April, after the president announced he would withdraw U.S. troops by September 11, 48% of voters approved and only 32% said the Afghanistan withdrawal was a bad idea. Fifty-one percent (51%) now believe more than 100 American civilians will be left behind in Afghanistan after the U.S. military withdrawal is completed, including 36% who think more than 500 will be left behind. Only 19% think the military withdrawal will leave fewer than 50 American civilians stranded in Afghanistan, including eight percent (8%) who think no one will be left behind. Nineteen percent (19%) are not sure.

    Thirty-four percent (34%) of American Adults rate the performance of public schools in America today as poor. That’s higher than the 30% combined who rate America’s schools as excellent (8%) or good (22%). These findings are line with surveys dating back to 2012, with the “poor” rating for America’s schools ranging from 26% to 36% and the combined “excellent”/ “good” total never topping 30%. When asked about the performance of public schools in the community where they live, however, 44% of Americans rate their local schools as either excellent (11%) or good (33%). Just 18% believe their local schools are doing a poor job.

    Fifty-two percent (52%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe Biden should resign because of the way the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan was handled. Thirty-nine percent (39%) disagree, and nine percent (9%) are not sure. Some in Congress have called for impeachment proceedings against Biden over the botched Afghanistan withdrawal, which left behind an unknown number of Americans in a country now controlled by the Taliban. Sixty percent (60%) of voters agree with a statement last week by South Carolina Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham: “I think Joe Biden deserves to be impeached because he’s abandoned thousands of Afghans who fought with us and he’s going to abandon some American citizens because he capitulated to the Taliban to a 31 August deadline.” Thirty-seven percent (37%) disagree with Graham’s statement. If Biden were to resign or be removed through impeachment, however, Harris would then become president, and most voters don’t think the VP is ready for that job. Only 38% say Harris is qualified to assume the duties of being president, including 25% who view her as Very Qualified to become president. Fifty-eight percent (58%) view Harris as unqualified to assume the duties of the president, including 47% who say she is Not At All Qualified.

    The president earned a monthly job approval of 46% in August, down three points from July. Fifty-three percent (53%) disapproved of his job performance in August, up four points from 49% in July. This is the third consecutive monthly decline since May, when 52% approved of Biden’s job performance. Donald Trump’s monthly approval ran from a high of 51% in February 2017, his first full month in the White House, to a low of 42% in August 2017. This past December, his final full month in office, Trump earned a monthly job approval of 47%. Fifty-one percent (51%) disapproved.

    Sixty-two percent (62%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe Congress should investigate how the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan was handled. Twenty-eight percent (28%) are against a congressional investigation and 10% are not sure. Only 31% of voters think the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan was successful, including 12% who rate it Very Successful. Sixty-five percent (65%) believe the withdrawal was unsuccessful, including 47% who say it was Not At All Successful. A group of retired generals and admirals published an open letter this week calling for Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin and Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Mark Milley to resign. Nearly half (49%) of voters say U.S. generals and officials involved in planning the withdrawal from Afghanistan should be forced to resign, but 35% disagree. Another 16% are not sure.

    According to Johns Hopkins University, the COVID-19 case-mortality rate – the percentage of diagnosed patients who have died from the disease – is 1.6% in the United States. The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 30% of American Adults correctly estimate the rate as being less than 2%, while 20% believe the rate to be between 2% and 5%. Seventeen percent (17%) estimate the mortality rate to be in the 5%-10% range and 19% believe the rate is more than 10%. Another 14% say they’re not sure. More viewers of Newsmax (40%) and Fox News (34%) correctly estimated the COVID-19 mortality rate than viewers of CNN (22%) or MSNBC (24%). Twenty-one percent (21%) of One America News (OAN) viewers correctly estimated the coronavirus mortality rate. Among Americans who say they don’t watch cable news at all, 38% correctly estimated the mortality rate as less than 2%. Thirty-seven percent (37%) of American Adults believe public health officials are lying about the safety of COVID-19 vaccines. That’s up from 32% in early July. Forty-four percent (44%) now don’t believe officials are lying about vaccine safety, but 19% are not sure. The highest levels of distrust are among those who say they most often watch conservative channels. Sixty-two percent (62%) of Newsmax viewers think public health officials are lying about the safety of COVID-19 vaccines, as do 60% of OAN viewers and 49% of Fox News viewers. Only 26% of CNN viewers and 25% of MSNBC viewers believe officials are lying about vaccine safety.

    Thirty-seven percent (37%) of American Adults believe violent video games lead to more violence in our society. Forty-three percent (43%) disagree and 20% are undecided. Thirty-nine percent (36%) believe violent movies lead to more violence in our society, but 46% disagree. Eighteen percent (18%) are not sure. These numbers are slightly down from two years ago, when 39% said violent movies and video games contributed to violence in society. They are much lower than earlier findings, when 52% blamed video games for violence in 2018 and 62% blamed violent movies in 2011.

    And for Biden's job approval numbers over the past week, not only underwater but below the “Strongly Disapprove” number:

    • Strongly Approve: 25%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 46%
    • Total Approve: 43% (-3)
    • Total Disapprove: 55% (+2)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 26% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 45% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 46% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 53% (+1)

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 32% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 42% (+2)
    • Total Approve: 51% (+2)
    • Total Disapprove: 50% (+1)

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 26% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 46% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 41% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 57% (+1)

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 26%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 47%
    • Total Approve: 42% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 57% (-1)

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 30%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43%
    • Total Approve: 47%
    • Total Disapprove: 53%

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 30% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 47% (-2)
    • Total Disapprove: 52% (+2)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 31%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 39%
    • Total Approve: 49%
    • Total Disapprove: 51% (+1)

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 35%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 31%
    • Total Approve: 55%
    • Total Disapprove: 44% (+1)
By Doug64
#15189967
Today's Dick Tracy:
Image
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-four percent (34%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending September 2, 2021. This week’s finding is remains the same as a week ago. Sixty-one percent (61%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, also unchanged from a week ago. A year ago at this time, 31% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 64% said it was on the wrong track.

    The Rasmussen Reports Immigration Index for the week of August 29-September 2, 2021, increased to 90.0, up from 87.6 two weeks earlier. The Immigration Index has been under the baseline in every survey since Election Day last year, and reached a record low of 82.3 in late March. The index is now about 15 points below where it was the week of October 22, indicating voters are looking for tighter immigration control from President Joe Biden’s administration.

    Fifty-three percent (53%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe the Biden administration failed to take proper precautions against a Taliban takeover. Forty-one percent (41%) disagree, saying instead that chaos was inevitable when American troops left the country. Sixty-nine percent (69%) think the United States should use military force to rescue Americans left in Afghanistan, if necessary, but 16% disagree and 14% are not sure. In an August interview with ABC’s George Stephanopoulos, Biden rejected “the idea that somehow, there’s a way to have gotten out [of Afghanistan] without chaos ensuing. I don’t know how that happens.” Sixty-one percent (61%) of Democrats share Biden’s belief that the chaos in Afghanistan was inevitable, but only 26% of Republicans and 34% of voters not affiliated with either major party agree. Seventy-one percent (71%) of Republicans, 57% of unaffiliated voters and 33% of Democrats think the Biden administration failed to take proper precautions against a Taliban takeover.

    Forty-six percent (46%) of Likely U.S. Voters support the new Texas law that effectively prohibits most abortions after six weeks of pregnancy. Forty-three percent (43%) oppose the Texas abortion law. Eleven percent (11%) are undecided. After the Supreme Court declined to grant an injunction to prevent the Texas law from going into effect, President Joe Biden responded by promising to “launch a whole-of-government effort… to ensure that women in Texas have access to safe and legal abortions.” Forty-six percent (46%) of voters support Biden’s effort to protect legal abortion, while 45% are opposed to Biden’s effort. Forty-six percent (46%) say abortion laws should be determined by state governments, significantly more than the 34% who believe the federal government should determine abortion laws. However, 20% are not sure.

    Sixty-four percent (64%) of American Adults are personally concerned about the coronavirus threat, including 37% who are Very Concerned. That’s an increase from late June. Thirty-three percent (33%) now are not concerned about the COVID-19 threat, including 11% who say they’re Not At All Concerned. Sixty-six percent (66%) of those surveyed say they have received a COVID-19 vaccination, while 28% say they haven’t gotten the vaccine. Dr. Anthony Fauci recently said he is “certain” that booster shots to increase protection will be necessary. Seventy-seven percent (77%) of those who have been vaccinated against COVID-19 say they would be willing to get such a booster shot. Eleven percent (11%) would not be willing to get a COVID-19 booster shot and 12 are not sure.

    Fifty-nine percent (59%) of American Adults believe private sector employees work harder than government workers. Only 13% disagree, while another 28% are not sure. That’s just slightly changed from 2018, when 62% said private sectors outworked their government counterparts. Fifty-nine percent (59%) also say government workers have more job security than workers in the private sector. That number has ranged as high as 70% in surveys since 2010. Only nine percent (9%) think government employees have less job security than private sector workers, but 19% say they have about the same amount of job security, and 12% are not sure. Biden last month announced plans to give all federal civilian employees an average 2.7% pay raise. However, 44% of Americans believe government workers already make more than their private sector counterparts. Twenty-eight percent (28%) don’t think government employees earn more than private sector workers, while another 28% are not sure.

    Twenty-two percent (22%) of American Adults say their state or local government’s COVID-19 policy has made them consider changing their place of residence, while 72% said they had not. Fourteen percent (14%) of those surveyed said they actually had changed their place of residence in the past year, while 83% had not. Of those who had moved in the past year, 37% said state or local government COVID-19 policy had made them consider relocating. Given a choice of living anywhere in the United States, 41% of Americans say they would rather live in a community with strict policies to deal with COVID-19, while 39% prefer to live somewhere without such restrictions. Fourteen percent (14%) said a community’s COVID-19 policy does not make much difference in where they would rather live.

    Forty-five percent (45%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe that many Americans have forgotten the impact of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. That’s slightly up from five years ago. Forty-two percent (42%) disagree that most Americans have forgotten the attacks by the Islamic extremist group al-Qaeda. Thirteen percent (13%) are not sure. Fifty-one percent (51%) think the bigger threat to the United States now is a domestic terrorist attack, while 38% say an attack from terrorists outside the country is more of a threat. That’s a significant increase in concern about foreign terrorist attacks from 2016, when only 19% believed threats from outside the country were the bigger threat. Voters are less concerned about anti-Muslim backlash. Just 34% now believe most American Muslims living in this country are treated unfairly because of their religion and ethnicity, a decline from 40% in 2016.

    Economic confidence fell to 104.4 in this month’s Rasmussen Reports Economic Index, down more than two points from August, the fourth consecutive monthly decline. Enthusiasm about the economy surged under former President Trump, reaching as high as 147.8 in January 2020 before tumbling after the coronavirus lockdown threw Americans out of work and closed many businesses. By November, it had recovered to 126.4, but dropped sharply in the three months after President Biden was elected. The index fell to 97.8 in February before beginning a three-month rebound that took the index to 123.7 in May, but has declined again the past four months. Thirty-three percent (33%) of American Adults rate the economy as good or excellent this month, unchanged from last month and nine points below the 42% mark in November. The number who rate the economy as poor increased to 34%, up two points from August. Twenty-three percent (23%) now think the economy is getting better, down two points from last month. Fifty-one percent (51%) expect a worsening economy, up two points from last month, but still five points lower than in February. Twenty-two percent (22%) now see things staying about the same, up two points from last month. There has been a remarkable reversal since President Biden was elected, as Democrats are now more bullish on the economy than Republicans. Forty-three percent (43%) of Democrats view the economy as good or excellent, compared to 23% of Republicans and 30% of those not affiliated with either major party. GOP confidence has declined more than 50 points since November, when 74% of Republicans had a positive view of the economy, while Democrats’ confidence has risen 11 points from 32% in November. While 68% of Republicans before the election said they expected the economy will improve, only 13% feel that way now. Democrats are now more optimistic, with 38% saying they expect the economy to get better, an increase of 18 points since January. Twenty-one percent (18%) of those unaffiliated with either major party now are optimistic that the economy will get better, up two points from January, and but five points lower than before the election.

    And for Biden's job approval numbers over the past week, still underwater, but at least no longer below the “Strongly Disapprove” number:

    • Strongly Approve: 27% (+2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 45% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 46% (+3)
    • Total Disapprove: 52% (-3)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 26%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 45%
    • Total Approve: 45% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 53%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 31% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 41% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 49% (-2)
    • Total Disapprove: 49% (-1)

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 28% (+2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 44% (-2)
    • Total Approve: 45% (+4)
    • Total Disapprove: 54% (-3)

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 26%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 46% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 43% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 56% (-1)

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 30%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43%
    • Total Approve: 46% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 53%

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 29% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 49% (+2)
    • Total Disapprove: 51% (-1)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 30% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 39%
    • Total Approve: 48% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 51%

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 35%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 31%
    • Total Approve: 55%
    • Total Disapprove: 44%
By Doug64
#15191026
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-four percent (34%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending September 9, 2021. This week’s finding is remains the same as a week ago. Sixty-one percent (61%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, also unchanged from a week ago. A year ago at this time, 30% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 64% said it was on the wrong track.

    Thirty percent (30%) of Likely U.S. Voters say it is important to their vote when celebrities or politicians from outside their state campaign on behalf of a local candidate. That includes 13% who say such outside endorsements are Very Important to their vote. Nearly two-thirds (66%) of voters say celebrities or outside politicians campaigning for a local candidate is not important to their vote, including 39% who say it’s Not At All Important. These findings are little changed from 2017, when just 26% said it was important to their vote when celebrities or politicians from outside their state campaigned for a local candidate. Biden is scheduled to campaign for Newsom today in Long Beach, California, in an effort to help the Democratic governor defeat Tuesday’s recall vote. Vice President Kamala Harris traveled to California last week to campaign for the embattled Newsom, who has been vocally supported by such Hollywood celebrities as Barbra Streisand and Alyssa Milano. An overwhelming 78% of voters say a candidate’s policies are the most important factor in deciding their choice, with just 17% saying the party a candidate represents is more important. A mere three percent (3%) say the prominent people who have campaigned for a candidate are most important.

    Forty-nine percent (49%) of Likely U.S. Voters agree that protesters arrested during the January 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol are being held as “political prisoners,” including 30% who Strongly Agree. Forty-two percent (42%) disagree, including 33% who Strongly Disagree. Matt Braynard, executive director of Look Ahead America, organizer of Saturday’s “Justice for J6” rally, told Paul Bedard of the Washington Examiner last week he has been “bombarded with death threats and threats of violence” since announcing the D.C. rally. Forty-eight percent (48%) of voters agree, including 31% who strongly agree, with a statement from Look Ahead America’s website: “The Department of Justice and the FBI have targeted, imprisoned, and persecuted non-violent American patriots.” Forty-six percent (46%) disagree, including 34% who Strongly Disagree. More than 500 people have been charged in connection with the January 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol, which began as a protest by supporters of former President Donald Trump, who believed last year’s election was stolen. Forty percent (40%) of voters now believe President Joe Biden did not win last year’s election fairly, while 52% say Biden did win the election fairly. Another eight percent (8%) are not sure.

    Fifty-one percent (51%) of Likely U.S. Voters support Biden’s executive order for all private companies with 100 or more employees to make sure their employees are fully vaccinated against COVID-19 or produce weekly negative test results. That includes 38% who Strongly Support the vaccine mandate. Forty-eight percent (48%) oppose Biden’s vaccine mandate policy, including 40% who are Strongly Opposed. Biden announced the policy last week, saying “many of us are frustrated with the nearly 80 million Americans who are still not vaccinated.” Seventy-two percent (72%) of voters surveyed say they have already received the COVID-19 vaccine, while 24% say they are not vaccinated. Sixty-four percent (64%) of those who are vaccinated support Biden’s policy, but among those who aren’t vaccinated, 96% oppose Biden’s vaccine mandate. Those who have been infected and recovered from COVID-19 have natural immunity to the disease, however, and 50% of voters say those who have natural immunity against the virus should not be made to get the vaccine. Thirty-nine percent (39%) would require them to get the vaccine anyway.

    Seventy-eight percent (78%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the Taliban takeover of Afghanistan is likely to provide overseas terrorists a base of operation for terrorism against Americans, including 53% who say it is Very Likely. Only 17% say it’s unlikely terrorists will use Afghanistan as a base to attack America. Sixty-seven percent (67%) of voters believe it is likely the reduction of immigration enforcement at the border will encourage Al Qaeda, ISIS, and other terrorist organizations to attack the United States. Twenty-seven percent (27%) say it is unlikely terrorist organizations will take advantage of reduced border enforcement.

    Fifty-nine percent (59%) of American Adults are concerned that crowds attending football games may spread COVID-19, including 34% who say they’re Very Concerned. Thirty-nine percent (39%) aren’t concerned about football crowds spreading the coronavirus, including 19% who are Not At All Concerned. Images of crowded stadiums at football games have caused expressions of concern from some in the media, including MSBNC’s Joy Reid who reacted to coverage of crowds by tweeting: “This is so dangerous. We are still in a pandemic, people!!!” Twenty-three percent (23%) of Americans say they plan to attend a football game in person this fall, while 66% say they don’t plan to go see a game. Eleven percent (11%) are not sure. Americans are slightly more excited about the return of college football than they are about NFL games. Forty-five percent (45%) say they are excited about this fall’s college football season, while 43% say they are excited about the professional football season.

    Seventy-three percent (73%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe it is likely that green card holders – permanent, legal U.S. residents – left behind in Afghanistan will be used as hostages by the Taliban, including a 48% who say it’s Very Likely. Only 16% think it’s unlikely the Taliban will use Americans as hostages in Afghanistan. Another 11% are not sure. Blinken admitted Monday in testimony to the House Foreign Affairs Committee that “several thousand green card holders” were still in Afghanistan after the chaotic U.S. military withdrawal. Blinken’s admission prompted a swift denunciation from Nebraska Republican Sen. Ben Sasse: “This is a national humiliation. … President Biden abandoned thousands of these American residents behind Taliban lines to fend for themselves. He has a duty to bring every single American citizen and green card holder home.” Seventy percent (70%) of voters agree with that quote from Sasse, including 51% who Strongly Agree. Only 25% disagree, including 10% who strongly disagree. Not surprisingly (87%) of Republicans agree with Sasse that leaving behind green-card holders in Afghanistan is a “national humiliation,” however a majority (56%) of Democratic voters also agree, as do 70% of voters not affiliated with either major party.

    Fifty-six percent (56%) of American Adults describe the politics of Hollywood as liberal, while just eight percent (8%) view the movie industry as conservative. Another 23% feel Hollywood is politically moderate. Thirteen percent (13%) are not sure. These findings haven’t changed much from the last time this question was asked in October 2017, when 63% said Hollywood was liberal. Forty-six percent (46%) of all adults now think movies and the film industry have a negative impact on society. Twenty-six percent (26%) believe movies have a positive impact, while 28% are undecided. Those who say Hollywood leans left are even more critical. Sixty-three percent (63%) of Americans who describe the politics of Hollywood as liberal feel that movies and the movie industry have a negative impact on society.

    And for Biden's job approval numbers over the past week, yet another week underwater with the Total Approve and Strongly Disapprove tied:

    • Strongly Approve: 26% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 46% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 46%
    • Total Disapprove: 52%

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 26%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 45%
    • Total Approve: 45%
    • Total Disapprove: 53% (+1)

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 31%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 41%
    • Total Approve: 49%
    • Total Disapprove: 49%

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 26% (-2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 44%
    • Total Approve: 43% (-2)
    • Total Disapprove: 55% (+1)

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 26%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 45% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 43%
    • Total Disapprove: 56%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 30%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43%
    • Total Approve: 46%
    • Total Disapprove: 53%

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 33% (+4)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 38% (-2)
    • Total Approve: 50% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 50% (-1)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 31% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 39%
    • Total Approve: 48%
    • Total Disapprove: 51%

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 35%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 32% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 55%
    • Total Disapprove: 44%
By Patrickov
#15191043
Sorry if what I am to ask is a stupid question.

If polls are made every week, would there be a risk that respondents are confined to a small group who are keen to answer any questions they happen to hear? Would this cause serious bias?
By Doug64
#15191154
@Patrickov, the polls aren't confined to a small group, unless you consider those that are willing to take the time to answer the questions when they are call as "small." But if so, every polling company has the same problem.
By Doug64
#15192116
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls--slightly early, but I'm going to be busy tomorrow. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-two percent (32%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending September 16, 2021. This week’s finding is down two points from a week ago. Sixty-two percent (62%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, up one point from a week ago. A year ago at this time, 31% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 64% said it was on the wrong track.

    The Rasmussen Reports Immigration Index for the week of September 12-16, 2021, decreased to 89.6, down from 90.0 two weeks earlier. The Immigration Index has been under the baseline in every survey since Election Day last year, and reached a record low of 82.3 in late March. The index is now about 16 points below where it was the week of October 22, indicating voters are looking for tighter immigration control from President Joe Biden’s administration.

    Forty-seven percent (47%) of American Adults say the economy will be weaker a year from now, while just 29% say the economy will be stronger. Fifteen percent (15%) expect the economy will be about the same a year from now. That’s a significant decline in economic confidence from March 2017, when 40% expected a stronger economy. For most of President Barack Obama’s second term, one-third or less of Americans said they expected a stronger economy, but that number jumped to 50% after President Donald Trump’s inauguration in January 2017. Increased pessimism is also reflected in views of the stock market’s future. More Americans now expect the stock market will be lower (36%) than higher (26%) a year from now, while 22% expect it to be about the same and 15% say they’re not sure. That’s a reversal from December 2020, when more thought the stock market would be higher (32%) than lower (21%).

    Fifty-four percent (54%) of American Adults disapprove of the policy allowing Americans to select the gender they would like printed on their U.S. passport, even if it does not match the gender on supporting documentation such as a birth certificate, previous passport, or state ID. That includes 39% who Strongly Disapprove. Only 35% approve of the new State Department policy, including 18% who Strongly Approve. Eleven percent (11%) are not sure. Secretary of State Anthony Blinken announced the new passport rules in June, and also said the State Department will soon give applicants the option of describing themselves on their passport as “non-binary, intersex, and gender non-conforming,” though he added that change would take time to implement due to “extensive systems updates.” The survey found that opposition to federally mandated transgender restroom policies for public schools has grown over the past four years. Sixty percent (60%) of Americans now oppose allowing transgender people to use the bathrooms and locker rooms of the gender they identify with, up from 49% in 2017. Twenty-five percent (25%) now support allowing biological males who identify as female to use women’s facilities, down from 38% in 2017.

    Thirteen percent (13%) of Likely U.S. Voters rate Biden as excellent on his handling of issues related to immigration. Another 17% rate his handling of immigration as good and 15% say Biden is doing a fair job on immigration. However, 52% rate Biden’s handling of immigration issues as poor. Biden’s ratings on immigration have worsened since April, when 50% of voters rated his handling of immigration as poor. Seventy percent (70%) of voters say the current situation with migrants at the U.S.-Mexico border is a crisis – up from 66% in May – while 21% don’t believe the border situation is a crisis. The Biden administration has tried to blame former President Donald Trump for the border crisis, with White House spokeswoman Jen Psaki saying the immigration system “was very broken when we took office.” However, most voters disagree, with 54% saying America’s current immigration problems are being caused more by the policies Biden has put in place since taking office. Only 37% still blame Trump’s policies. Fifty-three percent (53%) of voters rate the media coverage of the nation’s current immigration problems poor, while just 23% say the media’s immigration coverage is excellent or good.

    Forty-eight percent (48%) of Likely U.S. Voters think it would be a good idea for Trump to run for president again in 2024, while 44% say it would be a bad idea. In head-to-head matchups with either Biden or Harris, however, Trump would win by double-digit margins if the next election were held now. Biden would get just 41% against Trump’s 51% in a rematch, while Trump would do even better against Harris, getting 52% against the vice president’s 39%. At least one former aide has said he believes Trump is “definitely” planning a 2024 comeback campaign. Biden’s sagging approval ratings in the wake of the Afghanistan debacle have boosted prospects of a Trump return to the White House. An overwhelming 74% of Republican voters think it’s a good idea for Trump to consider a 2024 presidential campaign. Twenty-six percent (26%) of Democrats and 44% of voters not affiliated with either major party agree.

    Sixty-six percent (66%) of American Adults rate their own life today as good or excellent, although that’s down from 75% in 2018, which was the highest level of satisfaction recorded in regular surveys since 2006. Just eight percent (8%) now rate their life as poor, but that’s more than double the record low three percent (3%) who said the same in 2018. The number of Americans who now rate their life excellent (21%) marked the most significant decline, down from 29% in 2018. Americans continue to feel the years before age 40 are the best for most people: 58% feel that way, including eight percent (8%) who consider the years up to 18 best, 31% who prefer 18 to 29 and 19% who think 30 to 39 are the best years. Eleven percent (11%) say the 40s are best for most people, and another 11% say ages 50-64 are best, while eight percent (8%) favor 65 and older. Twelve percent (12%) say they’re not sure.

    Thirty-five percent (35%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the Biden administration’s plan to bring 95,000 refugees from Afghanistan to the United States for permanent resettlement is a good decision. Forty-seven percent (47%) say it’s a bad decision, while 17% are not sure. This week, House Democrats voted to approve the Biden administration’s request for $6.4 billion to pay for resettling Afghanistan refugees in the United States. But only 32% of voters believe Congress should approve this spending request, while a majority (56%) say Congress should not approve taxpayer money to resettle Afghanistan refugees. While a majority (57%) of Democrats think it’s a good decision to bring 95,000 Afghanistan refugees to the United States for permanent settlement, just 16% of Republicans and 31% of voters not affiliated with either major party agree. Seventy-one percent (71%) of Republicans, 26% of Democrats and 45% of unaffiliated voters say the Biden administration’s refugee resettlement plan is a bad decision.

    And for Biden's job approval numbers over the past week, yet another week underwater with the Strongly Disapprove higher than the Total Approve:

    • Strongly Approve: 25% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 46%
    • Total Approve: 44% (-2)
    • Total Disapprove: 55% (+3)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 25% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 46% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 44% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 54% (+1)

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 30% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 41%
    • Total Approve: 49%
    • Total Disapprove: 49%

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 27% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 45% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 43%
    • Total Disapprove: 55%

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 27% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 45%
    • Total Approve: 43%
    • Total Disapprove: 55% (-1)

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 30%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43%
    • Total Approve: 46%
    • Total Disapprove: 53%

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 32% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 39% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 49% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 50%

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 31%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 39%
    • Total Approve: 49% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 50% (-1)

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 35%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 32%
    • Total Approve: 55%
    • Total Disapprove: 44%
By Doug64
#15192974
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls--another early week! Busy tomorrow again. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-two percent (32%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending September 23, 2021. This week’s finding is remains the same as a week ago. Sixty-two percent (62%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, also unchanged from a week ago. A year ago at this time, 29% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 66% said it was on the wrong track.

    Thirty-six percent (36%) of Likely U.S. Voters support passage of the $3.5 trillion spending bill that currently has Congress deadlocked. That includes 23% who Strongly Support passage of the reconciliation bill. Fifty-three percent (53%) are opposed to passage of the $3.5 trillion spending measure, including 41% who Strongly Oppose passage. Ten percent (10%) are not sure. The House of Representatives last week passed short-term legislation to increase the federal government’s debt limit, a measure that the Senate must pass before the end of September to avoid a government shutdown. However, 52% of voters oppose raising the limit on federal borrowing, including 34% who Strongly Oppose raising the debt ceiling. Forty percent (40%) support raising the debt ceiling, including 23% who Strongly Support increasing the limit. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell says the Democrats will have to raise the debt limit without Republican votes, declaring last week: “The radical left … want to use this terrible but temporary pandemic as a Trojan horse for permanent socialism. And President Biden, who ran as a unifying moderate, is either powerless to stop them or does not wish to.” Fifty-nine percent (59%) of voters agree with McConnell’s statement, including 43% who Strongly Agree, while 33% disagree, including 24% who strongly disagree.

    Thirty-three percent (33%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the Supreme Court is doing a good or excellent job. Thirty percent (30%) rate its performance as poor. That’s a significant decline in approval from July 2020, when 41% believed the Supreme Court was doing a good or excellent job and only 17% rated its performance as poor. The appointment of three Supreme Court justices – Neil Gorsuch in 2017, Brett Kavanaugh in 2018 and Amy Coney Barrett in 2020 – during Donald Trump’s presidency may have shifted public opinion of the court’s political leanings. Thirty-five percent (35%) of voters now say the Supreme Court is too conservative, while 23% believe the court is too liberal. Thirty-three percent (33%) see the court politically as about right. During Barack Obama’s presidency, as many as 40% of voters believed the Supreme Court was too liberal.

    Thirty-two percent (32%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe the Biden administration’s immigration policy is better than Trump’s. Fifty-one percent (51%) say the Trump administration’s immigration policy was better, while 11% think the policies are about the same. In a Sunday interview on Fox News, Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas admitted that more than 12,000 Haitian migrants who had been camped out under a bridge near Del Rio, Texas, have been released into the United States and more may follow them. Fifty-eight percent (58%) of voters say DHS made a bad decision in releasing the Haitians into the U.S., while 25% believe it was a good decision and 17% are not sure. On Friday, Biden said Border Patrol agents who tried to stop the Haitian migrants from illegally crossing the U.S.-Mexico border should be punished: “I promise you: those people will pay.” Fifty-four percent (54%) of voters disagree with punishing the border patrol agents, including 40% who Strongly Disagree. Forty percent (40%) agree with Biden that the border patrol agents should be punished, including 20% who Strongly Agree.

    Fifty-one percent (51%) of American Adults think global warming is causing more extreme weather events, while 32% say it is not. Seventeen percent (17%) are not sure. The number who blame global warming for extreme weather is down slightly from 56% in 2018. Thirty-three percent (33%) believe this year’s hurricane season has been more severe than in previous years, while 12% say it has been less severe. Forty-two percent (42%) think this year’s hurricane season is about the same as previous years, while 12% are not sure. The current hurricane season, which does not officially end until November 30, has produced 17 named storms. The worst U.S. impact was from Hurricane Ida, which caused more than 80 deaths and as much as $95 billion in economic losses from Louisiana to New York.

    Sixty-nine percent (69%) of American Adults say they're paying more for a gallon of gas today compared to six months ago, and 74% think it’s likely those prices will continue to climb over the next six months. This includes 53% who think it’s Very Likely they’ll be paying even more for a gallon of gas in six months than they are today. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, the retail price of a gallon of gasoline has increased more than a dollar since Election Day 2020, rising from $2.11 to $3.18. Middle-income Americans have noticed higher fuel prices the most, with 79% of those earning between $30,000-$50,000 a year and 73% of those earning between $50,000-$100,000 saying they’re paying more at the pump than six months ago.

    Sixty percent (60%) of Likely U.S. Voters think keeping 2,500 U.S. troops in Afghanistan – as Milley testified this week he recommended to Biden – would have been better than a complete U.S. troop withdrawal. Twenty-four percent (24%) disagree, favoring the decision to withdraw completely from Afghanistan, while 16% are not sure. Milley’s testimony this week in congressional hearings contradicted what Biden said in an ABC News interview last month when he denied that his advisers recommended keeping 2,500 troops in Afghanistan. Asked who they believe, 57% of voters say Milley is telling the truth, while only 21% think Biden is telling the truth. Twenty-two percent (22%) are not sure who to believe. In the wake of Milley’s testimony, Tennessee Republican Sen. Marsha Blackburn, a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, declared on Twitter: “Biden can’t avoid the consequences of his actions [in Afghanistan]. He must resign.” Fifty-five percent (55%) of voters agree with that statement, including 41% who Strongly Agree. Thirty-nine percent (39%) disagree with the quote from Blackburn, including 29% who Strongly Disagree.

    Twenty-five percent (25%) of American Adults believe electric cars today are practical for most drivers. Fifty-two percent (52%) think electric cars aren’t practical, while 23% say they’re not sure. That’s not much of an improvement from a 2013 survey that found 19% believed electric cars were practical. More than two-thirds (68%) of Americans believe it’s likely most cars will still run primarily on gasoline a decade from now, including 33% who say it’s Very Likely gasoline-powered automobiles will still be the norm in 10 years. Twenty-eight percent (28%) say it’s at least somewhat likely their next automobile purchase will be an electric vehicle, including 11% who say it’s Very Likely their next car will be electric. But 63% say it’s not likely they’ll choose an electric vehicle for their next purchase, including 38% who say it’s Not At All Likely.

    And for Biden's job approval numbers over the past week, another week underwater with the Strongly Disapprove still higher than the Total Approve, and actually worse than Trump was at this point in his presidency on all counts:

    • Strongly Approve: 22% (-3)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 48% (+2)
    • Total Approve: 41% (-3)
    • Total Disapprove: 57% (+2)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 25%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 46%
    • Total Approve: 44%
    • Total Disapprove: 55% (+1)

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 30%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 41%
    • Total Approve: 49%
    • Total Disapprove: 49%

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 27%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 47% (+2)
    • Total Approve: 43%
    • Total Disapprove: 55%

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 27%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 45%
    • Total Approve: 44% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 55%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 30%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43%
    • Total Approve: 46%
    • Total Disapprove: 53%

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 30% (-2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 39%
    • Total Approve: 49%
    • Total Disapprove: 50%

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 31%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 39%
    • Total Approve: 49%
    • Total Disapprove: 50%

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 34% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 32%
    • Total Approve: 54% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 44%
By Patrickov
#15192981
Doug64 wrote:Thirty-two percent (32%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe the Biden administration’s immigration policy is better than Trump’s.
Fifty-one percent (51%) say the Trump administration’s immigration policy was better,
while 11% think the policies are about the same.


Wow this one is alarming. Very different from what I see on PoFo.

But seriously, isn't the USA already quite strict in its immigration policy?


Doug64 wrote:And for Biden's job approval numbers over the past week, another week underwater with the Strongly Disapprove still higher than the Total Approve, and actually worse than Trump was at this point in his presidency on all counts:

  • Strongly Approve: 22% (-3)
  • Strongly Disapprove: 48% (+2)
  • Total Approve: 41% (-3)
  • Total Disapprove: 57% (+2)



For Trump, this week:

  • Strongly Approve: 27%
  • Strongly Disapprove: 47% (+2)
  • Total Approve: 43%
  • Total Disapprove: 55%


I have a feeling that American voters voted Biden to contain the damage done by Trump, but they probably merely see Biden as "the other extreme" to have some Trump's stuff undone ASAP, rather than anything more.


(If this should be put in a new thread under "North America" please advise)
By Doug64
#15192983
Patrickov wrote:(If this should be put in a new thread under "North America" please advise)

Not at all, this is fine. Discussions of the poll results or why voters might feel as they do, what they might mean going forward, I don't have any problem with. It's discussions of whether they are right to feel as they do that could be problematical.

Wow this one is alarming. Very different from what I see on PoFo.

But seriously, isn't the USA already quite strict in its immigration policy?

The laws are pretty strict, and if fully enforced might be more than voters would like--especially the quotas, Americans are actually pretty accepting of immigrants and nonimmigrants (those granted permanent residency status and those permitted to live here temporarily). The thing is that the laws aren't really enforced--voters pretty much see Biden's policy as a refusal to control the borders at all. Consider, just recently the Chief of the Department of Homeland Security stated that being in the US illegally isn't sufficient cause to be deported.

For more detail on the poll:

Is the Biden administration’s immigration policy better or worse than the Trump administration’s policy? Or are the policies about the same?

Republicans
  • Biden's policy is better 11%
  • Trump's policy better 84%
  • They are about the same 3%
  • Not sure 2%

Independents
  • Biden's policy is better 23%
  • Trump's policy better 52%
  • They are about the same 18%
  • Not sure 8%

Democrats
  • Biden's policy is better 59%
  • Trump's policy better 20%
  • They are about the same 14%
  • Not sure 8%

I have a feeling that American voters voted Biden to contain the damage done by Trump, but they probably merely see Biden as "the other extreme" to have some Trump's stuff undone ASAP, rather than anything more.

One of the signs I've heard of popping up is a picture of Trump with the question, "Miss me yet?" The more situations like the rolling catastrophe at the border continue, the more the answer to that is likely to be "yes." Trump could end up the second person in US history to serve two nonconsecutive terms as president.
By Patrickov
#15192989
Doug64 wrote:Trump could end up the second person in US history to serve two nonconsecutive terms as president.


With the sentiment on him so polarised I have to refrain from making any predictions.

In fact, the unpredictability contributed to his rise to power.
Now that he actually had a term, this "surprise" thing is no longer with him.
But I somewhat worry that the "surprise" lies somewhere else now.
By Doug64
#15193036
Patrickov wrote:With the sentiment on him so polarised I have to refrain from making any predictions.

In fact, the unpredictability contributed to his rise to power.
Now that he actually had a term, this "surprise" thing is no longer with him.
But I somewhat worry that the "surprise" lies somewhere else now.

True, Trump’s a known quantity now, but the question would be whether you’d rather have a scoundrel or an incompetent as president and more than once voters have demonstrated that they’ll support a competent scoundrel.

XogGyux wrote:Why does this thread even exists? Who the fuk cares about this stupid poll?

Considering that this thread averages over 179 views per post, I’d say quite a few people care about these polls.
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By XogGyux
#15193043
Doug64 wrote:Considering that this thread averages over 179 views per post, I’d say quite a few people care about these polls.

ROFL, 80% of the posts are yourself copy and pasting some nonsense and about 15% of the remainder are people making fun of you.
GL with this nonsense, I am going back to not giving a fuk about this.
By Doug64
#15193061
@XogGyux, of course, most of the posts are the polls, that's the main point of the thread. You kinda missed the point of the number of people that drop in to see what those posts have to say.
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