Pfizer CEO predicts 'we will be able to come back to normal life' in a year even with new variants - Page 2 - Politics Forum.org | PoFo

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#15192719
Next year is a a traditional vaccine available for a part of unvaccinated who then will change mind, because they do not trust the pfizer hi-tec. Pfizer and Moderna cause fewer problems than common peanuts. Peanuts can cause alergic reaction to many people every food can do this, but I think peanuts are a bigger problem then vacccines.
#15193201
MistyTiger wrote:I think his prediction is inaccurate. The vaccination rate is slowly increasing in the US and the rest of the world is nowhere near herd immunity. I could see the pandemic dragging on for another two to three years unfortunately, if people insist on being hesitant. People need to wake the hell up and get the jab. It is for their health! Things will not magically improve if they just hide and pay attention to anti-vaxxers.


Maybe he means that within a year there'll be no one left to sell the jab to so we'd might as well all go back to business as usual, until the next big thing.
#15193208
AFAIK wrote:If Rancid developed a vaccine it would be a suppository. :|

If the pfizer vaccine had to be injected into the anus hole I wonder what the vaccination rate would be then?
#15193987
I expect that with the new pill , and oral vaccines being developed , the pandemic should be overcome by sometime next year , at the latest . If I am wrong , then I expect that I shall be losing confidence in the competence of the government .
The fact is more drugs are needed to fight a pandemic that has infected over 120 million people and killed 2.7 million worldwide. Vaccine pills are on the way

Of the more than 7 billion people on Earth, only about 1.2% of the world’s population is now fully vaccinated
One of the world’s first COVID-19 vaccine pills will soon go through its first clinical trial
Molnupiravir doesn’t stop the virus from replicating, though. Instead, the drug introduces errors into the virus’s RNA
For those cringing at the thought of getting jabbed with a COVID-19 vaccine out there, relief will soon come in the form of a pill.

The fact is more drugs are needed to fight a pandemic that has infected over 120 million people and killed 2.7 million worldwide.

There are 246 antivirals in development, according to the Biotechnology Innovation Organization, an industry trade group.

Today, 11 vaccines worldwide have been granted emergency use authorization or given full approval. Another 251 COVID-19 vaccines are at some stage of development. As of March 19, 410 million people around the world have gotten the jabs.

Of the more than 7 billion people on Earth, only about 1.2% of the world’s population is now fully vaccinated against the Coronavirus.

Taking an oral vaccine against COVID-19 could have a number of positive attributes, including being more affordable, having faster distribution (no freezing necessary), and is easier to administer as people would potentially be able to take the pill in the comfort of their own home.

One of the world’s first COVID-19 vaccine pills will soon go through its first clinical trial, allowing for the vaccine to be self-administered, more easily and quickly distributed, and with fewer side effects.

Behind it is a new pharmaceutical company called Oravax Medical Inc., which will start its first phase of clinical trials in Q2, 2021. Clinical trials found that the vaccine promoted the development of antibodies, which are necessary for longer-term immunity.

The vaccine candidate is also safe, efficacious, and well-tolerated at normal to high doses. Pfizer has begun testing an antiviral pill for Covid-19. A protease inhibitor, the drug would block enzymes required for the virus to replicate and could be used outside of hospitals by newly infected people. Phase one trial of the drug – called PF-07321332 – is being conducted in the US. Merck’s developers of ‘molnupiravir’ hope the pills can be prescribed widely to anyone who gets sick.

But beyond ensuring the drug works is making sure it’s safe.

Viruses are uniquely difficult to attack with drugs. They hijack human cells and set up machinery to churn out copies of themselves, creating a challenge: destroying the virus without harming the cells. Success, when it comes, can be fleeting, because viruses mutate to survive. Molnupiravir doesn’t stop the virus from replicating, though. Instead, the drug introduces errors into the virus’s RNA that are then replicated until it’s defunct.

Data from Merck’s Phase II/III trials are expected in late March.

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill presented a study of the drug’s main ingredient and researchers there said, based on their essays, that molnupiravir’s use should be limited to those likely to get the greatest benefits, “due to the unknown long term risks associated with systemic exposure to a DNA mutagen.” Vaxart

The San Francisco–based company engineered a common cold virus called an adenovirus to carry instructions for making two coronavirus proteins into human cells. There, the proteins can be made to prime the immune system to later fend off the coronavirus.

Vaxart’s vaccine is a pill that can be stored at room temperature and doesn’t need trained medical workers or equipment to administer. INOVIO

DNA instructions for building the coronavirus spike protein are zapped into the skin with a split-second pulse of electricity. From there, cells in the body produce the spike protein and cue the immune defenses.

No other vaccine has this delivery method. Electrical pulses that push the DNA into cells are made by a handheld device that resembles an electric toothbrush. Some people report that the zap is less painful than a needle stick.

The vaccine may produce fewer side effects than some already in use. “We haven’t seen fatigue and fever and other systemic effects,” says Joseph Kim, INOVIO’s chief executive officer.

Only five of 40 people tested in a Phase I study reported any side effects, and all of those were mild, researchers reported December 23 in EClinicalMedicine.

Additionally, the vaccine can be stored for a year at room temperature and for five years in a refrigerator. https://www.ameinfo.com/life/oral-vaccines-are-in-the-works-and-one-that-will-shock-you/
#15194406
Agreeing with the CEO of a giant corporation, Deutschmania wrote:I expect that with the new pill , and oral vaccines being developed , the pandemic should be overcome by sometime next year...

As soon as Pfizer's stock starts falling, the pandemic will be over.

Until then, buy lots of their stock! They currently control both supply AND demand!
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