Key Rasmussen Polls - Page 71 - Politics Forum.org | PoFo

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By Patrickov
#15193066
XogGyux wrote:ROFL, 80% of the posts are yourself copy and pasting some nonsense and about 15% of the remainder are people making fun of you.
GL with this nonsense, I am going back to not giving a fuk about this.


You are unhappy because some of the results are pro-Trump, which means you believe the poll is having a pro-Trump bias.

Just say it already.
User avatar
By XogGyux
#15193070
Patrickov wrote:You are unhappy because some of the results are pro-Trump, which means you believe the poll is having a pro-Trump bias.

Just say it already.

I don't fuking care what they say lol. Also, if the political waters is a measure of my happiness, just having that asshole being out of the Whitehouse is the equivalent of having a permanent 24/7 orgasm for the last year.
Trump lost. That's all I care. He is a loser. The actual numbers prove that. He loses money, his allies lose their freedom, their law licenses, their political offices.
To be honest, I have not read any of it, seems irrelevant data, too early and from a shitty source... so what is the use for it? It's like planning a trip to the beach for next august and checking today's weather non-stop. The guy is a 75 obese with unhealthy habits, being around in 3 years is not even a certainty. :knife:
By Patrickov
#15193072
XogGyux wrote:I don't fuking care what they say lol. Also, if the political waters is a measure of my happiness, just having that asshole being out of the Whitehouse is the equivalent of having a permanent 24/7 orgasm for the last year.
Trump lost. That's all I care. He is a loser. The actual numbers prove that. He loses money, his allies lose their freedom, their law licenses, their political offices.
To be honest, I have not read any of it, seems irrelevant data, too early and from a shitty source... so what is the use for it? It's like planning a trip to the beach for next august and checking today's weather non-stop. The guy is a 75 obese with unhealthy habits, being around in 3 years is not even a certainty. :knife:


Well how Trump or his circle does is not my concern here.

I am merely trying to figure out why you sound as angry as my posts in response to pro-China anti-West messages.
User avatar
By XogGyux
#15193075
Patrickov wrote:Well how Trump or his circle does is not my concern here.

I am merely trying to figure out why you sound as angry as my posts in response to pro-China anti-West messages.

You are projecting. I don't even know how this shit has anything to do with china. I just see 1 guy copy-pasting a low-reliability source of information in regards to an event that is not going to happen in a long time and pointing out what a fking waste of time it is.
By Doug64
#15193081
XogGyux wrote: ... a low-reliability source of information ...

That "low-reliability" source of information currently has a "B" raiting on FiveThirtyEight's pollster ranking, the same as CNN--though with a (slightly) better predictive rating. That "B" rating does seem a little odd, though--Gallup only called 69% correctly of 84 races polled (to Rasmussen's 78% of 748), but gets a B+.
User avatar
By XogGyux
#15193106
Doug64 wrote:That "low-reliability" source of information currently has a "B" raiting on FiveThirtyEight's pollster ranking, the same as CNN--though with a (slightly) better predictive rating. That "B" rating does seem a little odd, though--Gallup only called 69% correctly of 84 races polled (to Rasmussen's 78% of 748), but gets a B+.

What makes you think that I am going to run out to defend CNN or anyone else for that matter? They are mostly useless.

The poll I conducted on my house, a single responder. Roughly 50%/50% give or take 1% or 2% and it is within marging of error. But we will know for sure if my predictions and poll holds true by november 21st 2024 most likely. If not, for sure a day or two later.
By Patrickov
#15193126
XogGyux wrote:You are projecting. I don't even know how this shit has anything to do with china. I just see 1 guy copy-pasting a low-reliability source of information in regards to an event that is not going to happen in a long time and pointing out what a fking waste of time it is.


Sorry, I don't mean your anger is related to China. I just use my own example to say that you seem to be angry to the level of OOC (out-of-character).

From your signature, I suspect the real reason of your expression of anger is that the poll has a hint of pro-Republican or pro-Trump bias, which to some people is downright evil. Otherwise, you really would not have given a damn even if the poll is of low reliability.
User avatar
By XogGyux
#15193130
Patrickov wrote:Sorry, I don't mean your anger is related to China. I just use my own example to say that you seem to be angry to the level of OOC (out-of-character).

From your signature, I suspect the real reason of your expression of anger is that the poll has a hint of pro-Republican or pro-Trump bias, which to some people is downright evil. Otherwise, you really would not have given a damn even if the poll is of low reliability.


You are assuming too much. Anyway, in my opinion all of this is utterly pointless at this time. Best case scnearion is very midly helpful closer to major elections but we are 1 year away from the next major elections 3 years away from presidential ones, and even then it is so fucking close that most polls put both outcomes within margin of error.
Anyhow, like I said, I don't really care much for this, there is a reason that even though this thread has like 60 something pages you only got a couple posts at the end to point out how silly it is. And since I think it is so silly, this is my last post in here. Have a very nice happy love china day.
By Doug64
#15193861
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls--another early week! Busy tomorrow again. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty percent (30%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending September 30, 2021. This week’s finding is down two points from a week ago. Sixty-five percent (62%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, up three points from a week ago. A year ago at this time, 31% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 64% said it was on the wrong track.

    The Rasmussen Reports Immigration Index for the week of September 27-30, 2021, decreased to 88.9, down from 89.6 two weeks earlier. The Immigration Index has been under the baseline in every survey since Election Day last year, and reached a record low of 82.3 in late March. The index is now about 16 points below where it was the week of October 22, indicating voters are looking for tighter immigration control from President Joe Biden’s administration.

    Thirty-two percent (32%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe their representative in Congress is the best possible person for the job. That’s just one point higher than in April, when a majority of voters rated the job performance of Congress as “poor.” Forty-four percent (44%) of voters now say their representative in Congress is not the best possible person for the job, and 24% are not sure. Thirty-eight percent (38%) of voters say that, regardless of how Congress is doing overall, their local representative in Congress deserves to be reelected. Forty percent (40%) say their representative doesn’t deserve reelection. Twenty-two percent (22%) are not sure. While 40% of Republicans and 38% of Democrats say their local congressional representative deserves reelection, only 32% of voters not affiliated with either major party share that view. Forty-four percent (44%) of unaffiliated voters say their local representative in Congress does not deserve to be reelected, a view shared by 41% of Republicans and 39% of Democrats.

    Sixty-four percent (64%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe America has become more divided since the last election. Only 11% think the country is more united than before the election, while 23% say the level of division is about the same. Fifty-three percent (53%) of voters say Biden has done a poor job in terms of his campaign promise to unite Americans. Only 30% rate Biden as doing an excellent or good job in uniting the country. However, voters seem skeptical that a return of former President Donald Trump, who is reportedly considering a 2024 campaign, is the solution to the nation’s divisions. Only 31% believe another Trump presidential campaign would make the country more united, while 43% say a Trump 2024 campaign would make America more divided. Twenty-one percent (21%) say a 2024 Trump presidential campaign would not make much difference in terms of the country’s divisions.

    Thirty-five percent (35%) of Likely U.S. Voters now have a favorable view of Pelosi, while 60% regard her unfavorably. This includes 19% with a Very Favorable opinion of the San Francisco Democrat and 51% with a Very Unfavorable one. Only four percent (4%) have no opinion of her. In regular surveying since 2009, Pelosi’s favorables have generally run in the 30s, while her unfavorables have been in the 50s and 60s. Her favorables rose to a new high of 46% in January 2020, but have sharply declined since then. The last time more voters had an unfavorable view of Pelosi was May 2012. Forty-two percent (42%) of voters have a favorable view of McCarthy including 26% who have a Very Favorable impression of the House GOP leader. Only 34% rate McCarthy unfavorably, including 22% who have a Very Unfavorable view of the California Republican. However, 24% of voters don’t know enough about McCarthy to have an opinion of him.

    Sixty-five percent (65%) of Likely U.S. Voters are concerned about the potential for another surge of COVID-19 infections, including 33% who are Very Concerned. Thirty-four percent (34%) aren’t concerned about another pandemic surge, including 15% who are Not At All Concerned. Last week, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued guidance for dealing with COVID-19 during the upcoming Halloween and Thanksgiving holidays, including a recommendation for “virtual” online activities instead of in-person gatherings. Forty-eight percent (48%) of voters agree with the CDC recommendation, including 22% who Strongly Agree. But the same number, 48%, disagree with the CDC’s “virtual” holiday recommendation, including 32% who Strongly Disagree. New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy, a Democrat in the midst of a reelection campaign, criticized the CDC holiday recommendations: "We lose credibility [about COVID-19] if we’re being seen to be draconian when it completely defies common sense. … I don’t see why if you know everyone’s [vaccination] status you can’t sit down and enjoy dinner together.” Sixty percent (60%) of voters agree with that quote, including 33% who Strongly Agree, while just 27% disagree with Murphy’s criticism of the CDC, including 11% who Strongly Disagree. Fourteen percent (14%) are not sure.

    Forty-nine percent (49%) of American homeowners still think the value of their home is likely to go up over the next year. Just 17% say it’s more likely to go down, while 30% expect their home’s value to remain about the same. The percentage who expect the value of their home to go up is little changed from 48% in June 2020, which was just slightly below the high of 53% reached in October 2017. But the latest finding remains well above confidence in the housing market throughout the Obama presidency. Sixty-four percent (64%) of Americans say they own their own home, while 34% say they’re not homeowners. Sixty-seven percent (67%) of homeowners say their home is worth more than the amount they still owe on their mortgage, a finding that peaked at 69% in November 2018. Twenty-one percent (21%) now say they owe more than their home is worth. Twelve percent (12%) are not sure.

    Thirty-three percent (33%) of American Adults now say America’s best days are in the future. That’s a steep decline from last November, when 47% of Likely Voters believed the nation’s best days were still ahead. As recently as April 2019, an absolute majority (54%) of voters saw America’s best days in the future. Forty-three percent (43%) now say America’s best days are in the past, a 10-point increase from last November. Twenty-three percent (23%) are not sure. The decline in hope for America’s future is mirrored by a declining sense of fairness. Forty-nine percent (49%) say American society is basically fair and decent, while 38% believe America is unfair and discriminatory. Thirteen percent (13%) are not sure. As recently as January, a majority (54%) of Likely Voters viewed American society as basically fair and decent.

    Economic confidence fell to 96.6 in this month’s Rasmussen Reports Economic Index, down more than seven points from September, the fifth consecutive monthly decline. This is the lowest index level since May 2020. Enthusiasm about the economy surged under former President Donald Trump, reaching as high as 147.8 in January 2020 before tumbling after the coronavirus lockdown threw Americans out of work and closed many businesses. By November, it had recovered to 126.4, but dropped sharply in the three months after President Joe Biden was elected. The index fell to 97.8 in February before beginning a three-month rebound that took the index to 123.7 in May, but has declined again the past five months. Twenty-eight percent (28%) of American Adults rate the economy as good or excellent this month, down five points from last month and 14 points below the 42% mark last November. The number who rate the economy as poor increased to 39%, up five points from September. Twenty percent (20%) now think the economy is getting better, down three points from last month. Fifty-eight percent (58%) expect a worsening economy, up seven points from last month, and the highest level since May 2020. Sixteen percent (16%) now see things staying about the same, down six points from last month. There has been a remarkable reversal since President Biden was elected, as Democrats are now more bullish on the economy than Republicans. Forty-two percent (42%) of Democrats view the economy as good or excellent, compared to 17% of Republicans and 23% of those not affiliated with either major party. GOP confidence has declined 57 points since November, when 74% of Republicans had a positive view of the economy, while Democrats’ confidence has risen 10 points from 32% in November. While 68% of Republicans before the election said they expected the economy will improve, only 10% feel that way now. Democrats are now more optimistic, with 35% saying they expect the economy to get better, an increase of 15 points since January. Fifteen percent (15%) of those unaffiliated with either major party now are optimistic that the economy will get better, eight points lower than before last year’s election.

    And for Biden's job approval numbers over the past week, another week underwater with the Strongly Disapprove still higher than the Total Approve, and as bad or worse than Trump was at this week in his presidency on all counts. And Biden's approval in the average of polls to date just went underwater:

    • Strongly Approve: 23% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 47% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 43% (+2)
    • Total Disapprove: 55% (-2)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 24% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 47% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 44%
    • Total Disapprove: 55%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 30%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 41%
    • Total Approve: 49%
    • Total Disapprove: 50% (+1)

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 28% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 47%
    • Total Approve: 44% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 55%

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 27%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 46% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 43% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 55%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 30%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 44% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 46%
    • Total Disapprove: 53%

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 29% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 37% (-2)
    • Total Approve: 49%
    • Total Disapprove: 50%

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 31%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 38% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 49%
    • Total Disapprove: 50%

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 34%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 32%
    • Total Approve: 54%
    • Total Disapprove: 45% (+1)
By Doug64
#15194560
This is becoming a habit. Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty percent (30%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending October 7, 2021. This week’s finding remains the same as a week ago. Sixty-four percent (64%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, down one point from a week ago. A year ago at this time, 32% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 64% said it was on the wrong track.

    Sixty-five percent (65%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe that wider use of mail-in voting will lead to more cheating in elections, including 51% who say it’s Very Likely. Twenty-eight percent (28%) don’t think more mail-in voting will mean more cheating, including 14% who say it is Not At All Likely. Fifty-six percent (56%) of voters now believe it’s likely that cheating affected the outcome of the 2020 presidential election, including 41% who say it’s Very Likely. Thirty-nine percent (39%) don’t think it is likely the election was affected by cheating. The number who think President Joe Biden’s election was tainted by cheating has actually increased since April, when 51% of voters said they thought cheating likely affected the outcome. Ninety-five percent (95% of voters say it is important to prevent cheating in elections, including 89% who say it is Very Important. Despite the widespread suspicion that vote-by-mail will lead to more cheating, however, only 48% say it’s a bad policy for states to enact laws making mail-in voting a permanent part of elections. Forty-one percent (41%) say it’s a good policy to make vote-by-mail permanent. Ten percent (10%) are not sure.

    Forty-one percent (41%) of American Adults now have a favorable impression of Dr. Fauci, down from 44% in August. Forty-five percent (45%) now have an unfavorable impression of Fauci, up from 42% who had a negative view of him in August. Thirteen percent (13%) are not sure. In most recent controversy involving Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases said in an October 3 interview on CBS that it was “too soon to tell” whether families could get together to celebrate Christmas. Forty-eight percent (48%) of Americans disagree, including 35% who Strongly Disagree. Forty-two percent (42%) agree with Fauci that that it’s “too soon to tell” if Americans will be able to gather for Christmas, including 20% who Strongly Agree. Ten percent (10%) are not sure. Reacting to Fauci’s comment, New York Republican Rep. Elise Stefanik said on Twitter: “Fauci has lost all credibility with the American people. We aren’t waiting on his permission to celebrate Christmas together.” Fifty-four percent (54%) of Americans agree with the quote from Stefanik, including 38% who Strongly Agree. Thirty-six percent (36%) disagree with Stefanik’s quote about Fauci losing credibility, including 23% who Strongly Disagree. Eleven percent (11%) are not sure.

    Eighty-eight percent (88%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe it is Very Important for parents to be involved in their children’s education. Another 10% say parental involvement is Somewhat Important. U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland sparked controversy this month when he ordered the FBI to investigate parents involved in protests about school policies, saying they have engaged in “harassment, intimidation and threats of violence against school board members.” Forty-four percent (44%) of voters support the FBI investigation, including 28% who Strongly Support investigating the alleged threats, but 47% are opposed to the FBI investigation, including 39% who are Strongly Opposed. Eleven Republican senators on the Judiciary Committee sent a letter to Garland saying, “The reported heated encounters between concerned parents and school boards often involve speech that is clearly protected by the First Amendment. Federal law enforcement muscle should never be used against protesting parents.” Sixty-eight percent (68%) of voters agree with that statement, including 48% who Strongly Agree. Only 23% disagree, including seven percent (7%) who Strongly Disagree.

    Fifty-eight percent (58%) of American Adults believe college athletics have too much power and influence over colleges and universities. Twenty-two percent (22%) disagree and another 20% are not sure. That represents a decline in public concern about the influence of college sports programs since 2017, when 64% said athletics have too much power on campus. Only 43% of Americans now say big-time college sports programs corrupt the process of higher education, a number that has declined from a majority (52%) as recently as 2014. Thirty-two percent (32%) do not think sports corrupt the higher education process, but another 25% are undecided.

    Eighty-five percent (85%) of American Adults are concerned that supply chain problems may lead to shortages of basic items, including 49% who say they are Very Concerned. Only 11% are not concerned about the problem. Concerns have grown amid reports that dozens of cargo ships are waiting to be unloaded near the port of Los Angeles, while thousands of cargo containers are piled up in the port of Savannah. Sixty-two percent (62%) of Americans say they’ve already noticed shortages of basic items in stores where they live, while 30% say they haven’t noticed shortages. Sixty-five percent (65%) believe the federal government should take action to help fix the problems currently affecting the U.S. supply chain, while 18% are against federal action and 17% are not sure.

    Sixty-nine percent (69%) of Likely U.S. Voters are opposed to legislation that would require banks to report data to the IRS on transactions over $600, including 55% who strongly oppose the measure. Only 23% support the proposal, which is part of the so-called “Build Back Better” agenda Democrats are attempting to push through Congress. This week, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi defended the proposal, saying that having banks report transactions over $600 to the IRS is necessary because people “are breaking the law and not paying their taxes.” Sixty-six percent (66%) of voters disagree with that claim, including 52% who Strongly Agree. Just 28% agree with Pelosi’s argument, including 13% who Strongly Agree. Responding to Pelosi’s defense of the proposal, Republican Sen. Tom Cotton of Arkansas said on Twitter: “When they say they’ll only tax the rich, they’re lying.” Sixty-three percent (63%) of voters agree with that quote, including 49% who Strongly Agree. Thirty-two percent (32%) disagree with Cotton’s quote, including 21% who Strongly Disagree.

    Fifty-three percent (53%) of American Adults believe Halloween is an October holiday season. Thirty-nine percent (39%) disagree and say it’s just one night of kids trick-or-treating. Fifty-two percent (52%) say they decorate their homes for Halloween, while 44% do not. Some TV channels take advantage of the public’s Halloween fascination by airing October festivals of scary movies. Forty-one percent (41%) of Americans say they watch more horror movies around Halloween, while 53% do not.

    And for Biden's job approval numbers over the past week, another week underwater with the Strongly Disapprove well over the Total Approve, and as bad or worse than Trump was at this week in his presidency on all counts. And Biden's approval in the average of polls to date went further underwater:

    • Strongly Approve: 21% (-2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 48% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 42% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 57% (+2)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 23% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 47%
    • Total Approve: 43% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 56% (+1)

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 30%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 41%
    • Total Approve: 48% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 50%

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 27% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 47%
    • Total Approve: 43% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 55%

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 27%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 46%
    • Total Approve: 43%
    • Total Disapprove: 55%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 30%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 44%
    • Total Approve: 46%
    • Total Disapprove: 54% (+1)

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 31% (+2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 38% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 49%
    • Total Disapprove: 50%

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 31%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 38%
    • Total Approve: 49%
    • Total Disapprove: 50%

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 34%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 32%
    • Total Approve: 54%
    • Total Disapprove: 45%
By Doug64
#15195524
Broke my early streak, but still on time. Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Twenty-nine percent (29%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending October 14, 2021. This week’s finding is down one point from a week ago. Sixty-five percent (65%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, up one point from a week ago. A year ago at this time, 34% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 61% said it was on the wrong track.

    The Rasmussen Reports Immigration Index for the week of September 27-30, 2021, decreased to 86.2 down from 88.9 two weeks earlier. The Immigration Index has been under the baseline in every survey since Election Day last year, and reached a record low of 82.3 in late March. The index is now about 19 points below where it was the week of October 22, indicating voters are looking for tighter immigration control from President Joe Biden’s administration.

    Thirty-four percent (34%) of Likely U.S. Voters rate Biden’s handling of economic issues excellent or good, while 51% now give the president a poor rating on the economy. That’s a significant decline since July, when 42% of voters rated Biden good or excellent on economic issues and 43% gave him a poor rating. Eighty-three percent (83%) of voters now say they are concerned about inflation, including 57% who are Very Concerned, while just 14% are not concerned about inflation. Inflation worries have risen since May, when 76% of voters were concerned, including 45% who were Very Concerned. While a majority (62%) of Democrats still rate Biden excellent or good on his handling of economic issues, that view is shared by only 16% of Republicans and 20% of voters not affiliated with either major party. Biden’s positive rating on the economy has dropped 17 points with unaffiliated voters since July. Seventy-eight percent (78%) of Republicans and 60% of unaffiliated voters now give Biden a poor rating on the economy, as do 21% of Democrats.

    Thirty-seven percent (37%) of Likely U.S. Voters have a favorable impression of Buttigieg, including 20% who have a Very Favorable view of him. Forty-seven percent (47%) view Buttigieg unfavorably, including 36% who have a Very Unfavorable impression of the former mayor of South Bend, Indiana. Sixteen percent (16%) are undecided. Controversy about Buttigieg flared up last week after Politico reported that “that the secretary has actually been on paid leave since mid-August to spend time with his husband, Chasten, and their two newborn babies.” Forty-seven percent (47%) of voters approve of the Transportation Secretary taking a two-month paternity leave, including 27% who Strongly Approve. Forty-eighty percent (48%) disapprove, including 34% who Strongly Disapprove. Reacting to the report, Tennessee Republican Sen. Marsha Blackburn said, “We’re in the middle of a transportation crisis, and Pete Buttigieg is sitting at home. Meanwhile, cargo boats are unable to dock and shelves are sitting empty. Pete needs to either get back to work or leave the Department of Transportation. It’s time to put American families first.” Sixty-five percent (65%) of voters agree with Blackburn’s quote, including 48% who Strongly Agree. Twenty-eight percent (29%) disagree, including 18% who Strongly Disagree.

    Twenty-seven percent (27%) of Likely U.S. Voters are Very Confident that Biden is physically and mentally up to the job of being President of the United States. Another 14% say they are Somewhat Confident in Biden’s capability, while eight percent (8%) are Not Very Confident and 50% are Not At All Confident. Voter confidence in Biden’s ability has declined since August. At age 78, Biden is the oldest man ever elected president; concerns about his ability to do the job have been heightened by the fact that he hasn’t held a press conference since July. In a hearing last month, Idaho Republican Sen. James Risch suggested “someone is calling shots” for Biden: “He can’t even speak without someone in the White House censoring it or signing off on it.” Fifty-three percent (53%) of voters now believe others are making decisions for Biden behind the scenes, while just 38% think Biden is really doing the job of president.

    Fifty-two percent (52%) of American Adults believe medical personnel such as doctors and nurses should be required to get vaccinated against COVID-19. Forty-two percent (41%) are against making vaccination mandatory for medical personnel. Forty-five percent (45%) believe public employees such as police officers and firefighters should be required to get vaccinated against COVID-19, but the same number – 45% – disagree, while 10% say they’re not sure. In Chicago, the police union has gone to court in its fight against a policy requiring COVID-19 vaccination for all city employees. Hospital staffers across the country have been fired or suspended for not complying with COVID-19 vaccine mandates. Democrats are much more likely than other Americans to support making vaccination mandatory. Sixty-nine percent (69%) of Democrats think public employees such as police officers and firefighters should be required to get vaccinated against COVID-19, but that view is shared by only 26% of Republicans and 36% of those not affiliated with either major party. Similarly, while 77% of Democrats believe medical personnel such as doctors and nurses should be required to get vaccinated against COVID-19, only 32% of Republicans and 45% of the unaffiliated agree.

    Eighty-three percent (83%) of American Adults say they’re paying more for groceries now than they were a year ago, an increase from 79% in May. Only 11% now say they aren’t paying more for groceries. Fifty-three percent (53%) say rising food prices have caused them to change their eating habits, while 40% have not changed the way they eat because of inflation. Sixty-six percent (66%) expect that the amount they spend on groceries a year from now will be higher. Only six percent (6%) think they’ll be paying less for groceries in a year, while 19% expect their grocery bill to remain about the same.

    Forty-five percent (45%) of Likely Democratic Voters believe the Democratic Party should be more like Biden. Thirty percent (30%) feel the party should be more like Senate Democrats. Twenty-five percent (25%) are not sure. Four years ago, in October 2017, when some Republican senators were vocally criticizing President Donald Trump, 57% of GOP voters said the Republican Party should be more like Trump than like Senate Republicans. Two Democrats, West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin and Arizona Sen. Kyrsten Sinema, have effectively blocked passage of Biden’s agenda in Congress. Fifty-nine percent (59%) of Democrats say it is important to them that some Democratic senators oppose the man who was elected as a Democrat to the presidency, including 34% who say it is Very Important. Only 26% of Democrats say the opposition to Biden by Democratic senators is not important.

    And for Biden's job approval numbers over the past week, yet another week underwater with the Strongly Disapprove well over the Total Approve, and as bad or worse than Trump was at this week in his presidency on all counts:

    • Strongly Approve: 21%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 49% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 42%
    • Total Disapprove: 57%

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 22% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 48% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 42% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 56%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 30%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43% (+2)
    • Total Approve: 49% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 51% (+1)

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 26% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 46% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 42% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 56% (+1)

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 27%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 47% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 43%
    • Total Disapprove: 55%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 30%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 44%
    • Total Approve: 46%
    • Total Disapprove: 54%

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 28% (-3)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 39% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 48% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 51% (+1)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 30% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 38%
    • Total Approve: 49%
    • Total Disapprove: 50%

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 34%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 32%
    • Total Approve: 54%
    • Total Disapprove: 45%
By Doug64
#15196359
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-two percent (32%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending October 21, 2021. This week’s finding is up three points from a week ago. Sixty-four percent (64%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, down one point from a week ago. A year ago at this time, 38% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 58% said it was on the wrong track.

    Thirty percent (30%) of Likely U.S. Voters have a favorable impression of Garland, including 14% who have a Very Favorable view of him. Thirty-nine percent (39%) view Garland unfavorably, including 29% who have a Very Unfavorable impression of the former federal judge. Thirty-two percent (32%) say they’re not sure. Twenty percent (20%) of voters say Garland is doing a better job than most previous attorney generals, but more than twice as many (42%) say Garland is doing a worse job than most of his predecessors. Twenty-three percent (23%) say Garland’s performance is about the same as most previous attorney generals, while 14% are not sure. Garland’s numbers are worse than his fellow cabinet member, Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg, who is viewed favorably by 37% of voters. Garland provoked controversy this month when he ordered the FBI to investigate parents involved in protests about school policies, saying they have engaged in “harassment, intimidation and threats of violence against school board members.”

    Fifty-one percent (51%) of Likely U.S. Voters say climate change is a crisis. Forty percent (40%) disagree. Biden and 13 top officials of his administration will attend an upcoming United Nations climate meeting in Glasgow, which a White House official said will “showcase President Biden’s whole-of-government approach to tackling the climate crisis.” Forty-eight percent (48%) of voters say they support Biden’s approach to tackling the climate crisis, including 28% who Strongly Support it. Forty-six percent (46%) oppose Biden’s approach, including 36% who Strongly Oppose it. According to the White House official, “The countries who take decisive action on climate will reap the economic and jobs benefits of the clean energy future.” Fifty-six percent (56%) of voters agree with that statement, including 33% who Strongly Agree. 38% disagree, including 25% who Strongly Disagree.

    Thirty-three percent (33%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe Fauci has told the truth about U.S. government funding for gain-of-function virus research. That’s a decline from June, when 40% believed Fauci had told the truth. Forty-nine percent (49%) now say Fauci hasn’t told the truth about funding gain-of-function research. Nineteen percent (19%) are not sure. After a letter from the National Institutes of Health appeared to contradict Fauci’s denial that federal funds had been used to fund controversial research in a Chinese laboratory, Kentucky Republican Sen. Rand Paul said Fauci “should be fired.” Forty-six percent (46%) of voters say Fauci should be forced to resign, while 40% disagree and 14% are not sure. Seventy-one percent (71%) now believe it is likely the COVID-19 virus originated in a Chinese laboratory, including 49% who think it’s Very Likely, a slight increase since May. Sixteen percent (16%) now don’t believe it’s likely the coronavirus started in a Chinese lab, while 14% are not sure.

    Sixty percent (60%) of American Adults still consider themselves middle class, little changed from previous surveys. Another 20% consider themselves upper middle class. Just two percent (2%) think they are wealthy, while 20% say they’re poor, a number that has risen from 13% three years ago. What level of income defines “middle class”? Forty-three percent (43%) believe, to be middle class, someone needs a yearly household income of $50,000-$100,000, down from 49% in 2018. Another 25% think someone is middle class if they have an income between $25,000 and $50,000 per year. Thirteen percent (13%) think those earning less than $25,000 or between $100,000 and $200,000 per year are considered middle class, while just one percent (1%) say the same of adults who make more than $200,000 a year.

    Seventy-six percent (76%) of American Adults are concerned that public schools may be promoting controversial beliefs and attitudes, including 58% who say they are Very Concerned. Only 21% are not concerned about schools promoting controversial beliefs. Former President Barack Obama recently tried to dismiss parental concerns about schools in Virginia, describing controversies over transgenderism and Critical Race Theory (CRT) as “phony trumped-up culture wars” and “fake outrage.” However, 57% of Americans believe parents should be concerned about transgenderism and CRT in public schools, while only 27% think these are basically phony issues. Another 16% are not sure. Majorities across the political spectrum are concerned about what is being taught in public schools. Ninety percent (90%) of Republicans, 66% of Democrats and 76% of those not affiliated with either major party are at least somewhat concerned that public schools may be promoting controversial beliefs and attitudes.

    Fifty-seven percent (57%) of Likely U.S. Voters say the U.S. economy has gotten worse since Biden became president. Just 21% think the economy has gotten better with Biden in the White House, while 19% say the economy has stayed about the same. Thirty-eight percent (38%) of voters believe Biden deserves more blame for current problems with the American economy. However, 31% think Republicans in Congress deserve more blame, while 22% place the blame for economic problems more on congressional Democrats. Solid majorities of both Republicans (84%) and voters not affiliated with either major party (66%) say the economy has gotten worse since Biden became president, but just 26% of Democrats agree. Forty-one percent (41%) of Democrats think the economy has gotten better since Biden became president, but only seven percent (7%) of Republicans and 12% of unaffiliated voters share that view.

    Eleven percent (11%) of American Adults consider Halloween one of the nation’s most important holidays. Thirty-seven percent (37%) think it’s one of the least important, while 47% say it’s somewhere in between. These numbers are somewhat changed from three years ago, when eight percent (8%) said Halloween was one of the most important holidays. Halloween ranks with Valentine’s Day and St. Patrick’s Day among the holidays rated least important by Americans, who have consistently rated Christmas and Fourth of July as the nation’s most important holidays. Some school districts are banning Halloween celebrations, which have “historically marginalized students of color,” according to officials in Seattle. However, 78% of Americans think public schools should allow children to wear costumes to class in celebration of Halloween. Only 11% disagree, while another 11% are not sure.

    And for Biden's job approval numbers over the past week, yet another week underwater with the Strongly Disapprove well over the Total Approve, and as bad or worse than Trump was at this week in his presidency on all counts:

    • Strongly Approve: 21%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 48% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 42%
    • Total Disapprove: 57%

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 22%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 48%
    • Total Approve: 42%
    • Total Disapprove: 56%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 29% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 42% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 48% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 50% (-1)

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 27% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 47% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 42%
    • Total Disapprove: 56%

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 27%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 47%
    • Total Approve: 43%
    • Total Disapprove: 56% (+1)

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 30%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 44%
    • Total Approve: 46%
    • Total Disapprove: 54%

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 29% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 48%
    • Total Disapprove: 51%

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 30%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 39% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 49%
    • Total Disapprove: 51% (+1)

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 34%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 33% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 54%
    • Total Disapprove: 45%
By Doug64
#15197148
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Twenty-nine percent (29%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending October 28, 2021. This week’s finding is down three points from a week ago. Sixty-six percent (66%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, up two points from a week ago. A year ago at this time, 41% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 54% said it was on the wrong track.

    The Rasmussen Reports Immigration Index for the week of October 24-28, 2021, increased to 88.3 up from 86.2 two weeks earlier. The Immigration Index has been under the baseline in every survey since Election Day last year, and reached a record low of 82.3 in late March. The index is now about 17 points below where it was in late October 2020, indicating voters are looking for tighter immigration control from President Joe Biden’s administration.

    Fifty-seven percent (57%) of Likely U.S. Voters think, compared to most recent presidents, President Biden is a weaker commander in chief for the military. That’s up from 43% in May. Only 24% now believe Biden is a stronger commander in chief than most recent presidents, down from 32% in May. Fifteen percent (15%) say Biden is about the same as most recent presidents as a military leader. Sixteen percent (16%) of voters surveyed are current or former members of the U.S. military, and 61% of those with military experience said Biden is a weaker commander in chief. In June 2018, 40% of voters, and a majority of those with military experience, said President Donald Trump was a stronger commander-in-chief for the military than most recent presidents.

    Thirty-six percent (36%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the Virginia and New Jersey elections are more of a referendum on Biden, while 35% say the elections are more about local issues. Another 30% are not sure. Republicans (40%) are more likely than Democrats (33%) or voters not affiliated with either major party (34%) to see today’s off-year elections as a referendum on Biden. Biden’s sagging job approval numbers have been seen as a disadvantage to Democratic candidates Terry McAuliffe in Virginia and Gov. Phil Murphy in New Jersey, but the president has campaigned for Democrats in both states. Forty percent (40%) of Likely Voters nationwide say it would hurt candidates in their state if Biden came to campaign for them, while just 28% said a campaign appearance by the president would help candidates in their state. Twenty-two percent (22%) say a campaign appearance by Biden would have no impact in their state, while 10% are not sure.

    Seventy-two percent (72%) of American Adults believe cancel culture – a form of censorship that harms the careers and reputations of public figures for doing or saying things that are considered offensive – has gotten out of control. Only 15% disagree, while 12% are not sure. Seventy-five percent (75%) believe protecting free speech is more important than protecting people from speech that is offensive. Just 16% disagree. Chapelle sparked protests last month after the comedian made jokes about transgenderism in his Netflix special The Closer. In a nation divided by politics, concern about cancel culture transcends party lines. Eighty-six percent (86%) of Republicans, 60% of Democrats and 74% of those not affiliated with either major party say cancel culture has gotten out of control. However, significantly more Democrats (27%) than Republicans (9%) or the unaffiliated (11%) think protecting people from speech that is offensive is more important than protecting free speech.

    Fifty-two percent (52%) of Likely U.S. Voters say they support workers refusing to comply with workplace requirements to get COVID-19 vaccines. Thirty-eight percent (38%) don’t support workers resisting the mandates, while 10% are not sure. Opposition to vaccine mandates could potentially lead to thousands of U.S. workers losing their jobs, Reuters reported this week. Fifty-nine percent (59%) of voters believe this would be bad for the U.S. economy, while 14% think it would be good for the economy and 19% say it will not have much impact. Workplace mandates were implemented in the wake of President Joe Biden’s September executive order requiring all private companies with 100 or more employees to make sure their employees are fully vaccinated against COVID-19 or produce weekly negative test results. Despite concerns about the effects of vaccine mandates, 49% of voters still say they support Biden’s policy, including 37% who Strongly Support it. Forty-eight percent (48%) oppose Biden’s mandatory vaccination policy, including 39% who Strongly Oppose it. That’s just slightly changed from September.

    Sixty-two percent (62%) of American Adults favor the national legalization of marijuana, while 23% are opposed to legalization and 14% are not sure. Three years ago, 54% of Likely Voters favored legalizing marijuana nationwide. Legislation that would decriminalize cannabis at the federal level has been making its way through Congress. While Americans generally favor legalization, they are divided over what level of government should determine policy. Forty-seven percent (47%) think legalizing marijuana should be a federal decision, while 32% believe it should be a state issue, and 11% say legalization should be a matter for local government. Ten percent (10%) are not sure. Fifty percent (50%) of those surveyed said they have smoked marijuana, while 45% say they never smoked it. Among those who have smoked marijuana, 82% favor national legalization, while non-users are about evenly divided, with 43% in favor and 40% opposed to legalizing marijuana.

    Seventeen percent (17%) of American Adults say they own cryptocurrency, while 76% say they don’t. In 2014, only two percent (2%) of Americans said they had used Bitcoin. Bitcoin prices have increased about sixfold in the past year, and Eric Adams, newly elected as mayor of New York City, says he’ll take his paycheck in Bitcoin. Forty-four percent (44%) of Americans say they have closely followed recent news reports about cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin, including 16% who’ve followed the news Very Closely. A majority (52%) haven’t followed cryptocurrency news closely, including 20% who say they haven’t followed it at all. Among those who say they own cryptocurrency, the top incentive is the potential for large financial gains (57%), while 24% say the best reason to invest in cryptocurrency is to protect financial privacy and 12% believe protecting against inflation is the best reason for crypto investment.

    And for Biden's job approval numbers over the past week, yet another week underwater with the Strongly Disapprove well over the Total Approve, and again as bad (mostly) or worse (slightly) than Trump was at this week in his presidency on all counts. Biden did improve, though:

    • Strongly Approve: 22% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 47% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 43% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 55% (-2)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 22%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 48%
    • Total Approve: 42%
    • Total Disapprove: 56%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 29%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 42%
    • Total Approve: 48%
    • Total Disapprove: 50% (+1)

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 28% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 47%
    • Total Approve: 43% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 55% (-1)

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 27%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 47%
    • Total Approve: 43%
    • Total Disapprove: 55% (-1)

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 30%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 44%
    • Total Approve: 46%
    • Total Disapprove: 54%

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 29%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 47% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 52% (+1)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 29% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 39%
    • Total Approve: 48% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 51%

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 34%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 33%
    • Total Approve: 54%
    • Total Disapprove: 45%
By Doug64
#15197877
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty percent (30%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending November 4, 2021. This week’s finding is up one point from a week ago. Sixty-five percent (65%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, down one point from a week ago. A year ago at this time, 36% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 59% said it was on the wrong track.

    Seventeen percent (17%) of Likely U.S. Voters think undocumented immigrants should be able to sue the United States government, while 66% say they shouldn’t be able to file such lawsuits. Seventeen percent (17%) are not sure. President Joe Biden last week dismissed as “garbage” a report from the Wall Street Journal that his Justice Department was negotiating payments of as much as $450,000 to each member of immigrant families separated at the U.S.-Mexico border under former President Donald Trump’s administration. Barely a quarter of voters believe such immigrants should be paid anything at all. Just six percent (6%) of voters think immigrants separated at the border during the Trump administration should receive more than $200,000 each in a lawsuit settlement, while another six percent (6%) say such immigrants such get between $100,000 and $200,000. Fourteen percent (14%) think a settlement of in the $50,000-$100,000 range would be appropriate. However, more than half (57%) of voters say the federal government should pay nothing to these immigrants. Another 17% are not sure.

    Twenty-seven percent (27%) of Likely U.S. Voters say they would be more likely to vote for a candidate for election in their state who was endorsed by Biden. Fifty-one percent (51%) would be less likely to vote for a candidate endorsed by Biden. Twenty percent (20%) say a Biden endorsement would not make much difference in their vote. Thirty-eight percent (38%) of voters say they would be more likely to vote for a candidate for election who was endorsed by Trump, while 39% say a Trump endorsement would make them less likely to vote for a candidate in their state. An endorsement from Trump would help candidates with Republican voters more than Biden’s endorsement would help with Democratic voters. Fifty percent (50%) of Democratic voters say they would be more likely to vote for a Biden-endorsed candidate in their state, while 64% of GOP voters say a Trump endorsement would make it more likely they’d vote for a candidate. Among voters not affiliated with either major party, only 14% say a Biden endorsement would make them more likely to vote for a candidate in their state, while 32% would be more likely to vote for a Trump-endorsed candidate.

    Thirty-seven percent (37%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe the jury should find Rittenhouse guilty, while 36% think the jury should find the teenager not guilty. Twenty-seven percent (27%) are not sure. Rittenhouse was 17 when he shot three people, two of whom died, during the riots that engulfed Kenosha in August 2020. He is charged with multiple felonies, including homicide, that could send him to prison for life. Defense attorneys have argued that Rittenhouse fired in self-defense after he was attacked by rioters, an argument rejected by most Democratic voters. Fifty-nine percent (59%) of Democrats think the Kenosha jury should find Rittenhouse guilty, but that belief is shared by only 22% of Republicans and 25% of voters not affiliated with either major party. Fifty percent (50%) of Republicans believe the jury should find Rittenhouse not guilty, as do 20% of Democrats and 40% of unaffiliated voters.

    Sixty-five percent (65%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe it would be good for the economy if the federal budget was balanced. Only 12% say it would be bad for the economy instead, while 14% say a balanced budget would have no impact. Nine percent (9%) are not sure. Those numbers are barely changed from 2018, when Donald Trump was president and Republicans had majorities in both houses of Congress. Also unchanged is the pessimism of voters about the likelihood that Congress will actually balance the budget. Just 21% think it is likely that the federal budget will be balanced for even a single year during their lifetime, and that includes only six percent (6%) who say it’s Very Likely. Seventy-two percent (72%) consider a balanced budget unlikely in their lifetime, with 33% who say it’s Not At All Likely.

    Thirty-five percent (35%) of American Adults believe public schools should make COVID-19 vaccination mandatory for students, while 55% are against requiring students to get vaccinated. Ten percent (10%) are not sure. The Food and Drug Administration last month approved COVID-19 vaccines for children as young as five years old, but 60% of Americans say they are concerned about the safety of COVID-19 vaccination for children, including 39% who are Very Concerned. Thirty-five percent (35%) are not concerned about vaccine safety for children, including 17% who are Not At All Concerned. There is a remarkable political division over requiring COVID-19 vaccination for children. Sixty-one percent (61%) of Democrats want to make the vaccine mandatory for public school students, but that opinion is shared by only 17% of Republicans and 24% of those affiliated with neither major party. Seventy-seven percent (77%) of Republicans and 61% of the unaffiliated are against a COVID-19 vaccine mandate for public school students, as are 31% of Democrats.

    Eighty-two percent (82%) of Likely U.S. Voters are concerned that the supply-chain crisis could lead to shortages of food and other basic supplies, including 49% who are Very Concerned. Only 17% are not concerned about the possibility of shortages. President Biden last week admitted Americans are worried about the supply chain, but said most don’t understand the “confusing” issue. Only 27% of voters believe the Biden administration is doing enough to fix problems with the U.S. supply chain, while 59% think the administration is not doing enough. Another 14% are not sure. Eighty-four percent (84%) of Republicans, 33% of Democrats and 63% of voters not affiliated with either major party don’t think the Biden administration is doing enough to fix problems with the U.S. supply chain. Even among Democratic voters, just 45% believe the administration is doing enough to fix the problems, and only 11% of Republicans and 21% of unaffiliated voters share that belief.

    Economic confidence rose to 96.9 in this month’s Rasmussen Reports Economic Index, less than one point higher than October, which was the lowest index level since May 2020. Enthusiasm about the economy surged under former President Donald Trump, reaching as high as 147.8 in January 2020 before tumbling after the coronavirus lockdown threw Americans out of work and closed many businesses. By November 2020, it had recovered to 126.4, but dropped sharply in the three months after President Joe Biden was elected. The index fell to 97.8 in February before beginning a three-month rebound that took the index to 123.7 in May, followed by a five-month streak of declines. Twenty-nine percent (29%) of American Adults rate the economy as good or excellent this month, up one point from last month but 13 points below the 42% mark last November. The number who rate the economy as poor increased to 41%, up two points from October. Eighteen percent (18%) now think the economy is getting better, down two points from last month. Fifty-six percent (56%) expect a worsening economy, down two points from last month. Twenty percent (20%) now see things staying about the same, up four points from last month. There has been a remarkable reversal since President Biden was elected, as Democrats are now more bullish on the economy than Republicans. Forty-two percent (42%) of Democrats view the economy as good or excellent, compared to 19% of Republicans and 23% of those not affiliated with either major party. GOP confidence has declined 55 points since November 2020, when 74% of Republicans had a positive view of the economy, while Democrats’ confidence has risen 10 points from 32% before Biden’s election. While 68% of Republicans before the election said they expected the economy will improve, only nine percent (9%) feel that way now. Democrats are now more optimistic, with 30% saying they expect the economy to get better, an increase of 10 points since January. Fifteen percent (14%) of those unaffiliated with either major party now are optimistic that the economy will get better, nine points lower than before last year’s election.

    And for Biden's job approval numbers over the past week, yet another week underwater with the Strongly Disapprove well over the Total Approve, and again as bad (mostly) or worse (slightly) than Trump was at this week in his presidency on all counts. Biden's bump last week was brief....:

    • Strongly Approve: 21% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 49% (+2)
    • Total Approve: 41% (-2)
    • Total Disapprove: 58% (+3)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 21% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 48%
    • Total Approve: 42%
    • Total Disapprove: 57% (+1)

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 29%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 42%
    • Total Approve: 48%
    • Total Disapprove: 50% (+1)

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 27% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 48% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 43%
    • Total Disapprove: 56% (+1)

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 27%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 47%
    • Total Approve: 43%
    • Total Disapprove: 56% (+1)

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 29% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 44%
    • Total Approve: 46%
    • Total Disapprove: 54%

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 30% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 39% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 48% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 51% (-1)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 29%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 39%
    • Total Approve: 48%
    • Total Disapprove: 51%

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 34%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 33%
    • Total Approve: 54%
    • Total Disapprove: 45%
By Doug64
#15199091
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-three percent (33%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending November 11, 2021. This week’s finding is up three points from a week ago. Sixty-four percent (64%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, down one point from a week ago. A year ago at this time, 35% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 56% said it was on the wrong track.

    The Rasmussen Reports Immigration Index for the week of October 24-28, 2021, decreased to 88.0 down from 88.3 two weeks earlier. The Immigration Index has been under the baseline in every survey since Election Day last year, and reached a record low of 82.3 in late March. The index is now more than 17 points below where it was in late October 2020, indicating voters are looking for tighter immigration control from President Joe Biden’s administration.

    Fifty-three percent (53%) of Likely U.S. Voters don’t trust the political news they’re getting. That’s up from 43% in July. Just 33% now say they trust the political news they’re getting, down from 37% in July. Another 14% are not sure. Fifty-eight percent (58%) of voters believe the news media are less aggressive in questioning Biden than they were in questioning Trump. Only 17% think the media question Biden more aggressively than they did with Trump, while 21% think the media’s question of Biden has been about the same as Trump. More Democrats (48%) than Republicans (21%) or those not affiliated with either major party (26%) trust the political news they’re getting. Even among Democrats, however, nearly a third (32%) don’t trust political news, a sentiment shared by 69% of Republicans and 62% of unaffiliated voters.

    Fifty-one percent (51%) of Likely U.S. Voters would vote for the Republican candidate, while 38% would vote for the Democrat. Just three percent (3%) would vote for some other candidate, but another eight percent (8%) are not sure. In January 2018, before voters handed Democrats their first House majority in eight years, Democrats held an eight-point advantage (45% to 37%) in the generic ballot question. That margin narrowed as the November 2018 midterms neared, and was a statistical dead heat – Republicans 46%, Democrats 45% – in the final poll before Democrats won a slim House majority while Republicans maintained control of the Senate. The 13-point edge for Republicans in the latest poll is larger than Democrats enjoyed at any time during the 2018 midterm campaign, due both to greater GOP partisan intensity and a wide advantage among independents. While 89% of Republican voters say they would vote for their own party’s candidate, only 77% of Democrats would vote for the Democratic candidate. Among voters not affiliated with either major party, 48% would vote Republican and 26% would vote Democrats, with another 17% undecided.

    Forty-four percent (44%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the federal government should keep track of who owns guns in the United States, while an equal number (44%) disagree and 12% are not sure. Forty-three percent (43%) of voters either own guns or live with someone who does, while 49% live in gun-free homes. Among voters in gun-owning households, 53% say the federal government should not keep track of who owns guns in the United States. Among those in gun-free households, however, 55% say the government should keep track of gun ownership. The advocacy group Gun Owners of America (GOA) recently warned that the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms (ATF) is compiling millions of records on U.S. gun owners. GOA and other groups are concerned President Joe Biden’s administration is creating “a national database of gun owners — which has long been prohibited under U.S. law.” Fifty-one percent (51%) of voters believe that, if the federal government had a list of gun owners in the United States, it is likely the government would eventually confiscate all guns. That includes 32% who think it Very Likely that federal listing of gun owners would lead to confiscation. Thirty-eight percent (38%) don’t think it’s likely that a government list of gun owners would eventually lead to confiscation, including 20% who say it is Not At All Likely.

    Eighty-two percent (82%) of Likely U.S. Voters think it’s important that the federal Justice Department and the FBI avoid interfering in the political process. That includes 64% who say it’s Very Important to keep the FBI and DOJ out of politics. Only nine (9%) don’t think it’s important for the FBI and DOJ to stay out of the political process, while an equal number are not sure. Bannon turned himself in to federal authorities this week, after he had refused to cooperate with a subpoena from the House Select Committee investigating the January 6 Capitol riot. Fifty-five percent (55%) of voters think the prosecution of Bannon is politically motivated, while 34% say it’s not and 11% are not sure. The FBI raided O’Keefe and his associates at Project Veritas this month as part of an investigation into the alleged theft of Biden’s daughter’s diary. Fifty-two percent (52%) of voters believe the investigation of O’Keefe is politically motivated, while 29% don’t think it’s politically motivated and 20% are not sure.

    Seventy-nine percent (79%) of American Adults say they are planning on getting together with family or friends this Thanksgiving. That’s up from 50% last year. Thirteen percent (13%) won’t be gathering with family or friends for the holiday. About two-thirds (66%) of Americans will spend Thanksgiving at home, while 27% will travel away from home for the holiday this year. The number planning to travel is up from 22% last Thanksgiving. Only 23% say the continued COVID-19 pandemic has affected their plans for this Thanksgiving, while 72% say the pandemic hasn’t affected their holiday plans. Among those who plan to travel for Thanksgiving, 69% say COVID-19 hasn’t affected their holiday plans.

    Thirty-one percent (31%) of American Adults now say the job market is better than it was a year ago. That’s down seven points since July. Forty-one percent (41%) say the job market is worse than a year ago – up from 35% in July – and 21% say it’s about the same as it was a year ago. Not since October 2012 have as many Americans said the job market was worse. Twenty-seven percent (27%) of Americans now believe that unemployment will be lower a year from now – down 12 points from July – while 37% expect unemployment will be higher, up nine points since July. Twenty-five percent (25%) think unemployment will stay about the same.

    And for Biden's job approval numbers over the past week, yet another week underwater with the Strongly Disapprove well over the Total Approve, worse across the board than Trump was at this week in his presidency. And his Total Disapprove for for his entire term just bumped up to 51%:

    • Strongly Approve: 20% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 49%
    • Total Approve: 41%
    • Total Disapprove: 58%

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 21%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 48%
    • Total Approve: 42%
    • Total Disapprove: 57%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 29%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 42%
    • Total Approve: 48%
    • Total Disapprove: 51% (+1)

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 28% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 46% (-2)
    • Total Approve: 44% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 55% (-1)

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 28% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 47%
    • Total Approve: 43%
    • Total Disapprove: 55% (-1)

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 29%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 44%
    • Total Approve: 46%
    • Total Disapprove: 54%

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 28% (-2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 39%
    • Total Approve: 48%
    • Total Disapprove: 50% (-1)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 29%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 39%
    • Total Approve: 48%
    • Total Disapprove: 51%

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 34%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 33%
    • Total Approve: 53% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 45%
By Doug64
#15200170
I hope all those in the US had a safe and wonderful Thanksgiving! Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty percent (30%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending November 18, 2021. This week’s finding is down three points from a week ago. Sixty-five percent (65%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, up one point from a week ago. A year ago at this time, 32% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 60% said it was on the wrong track.

    Seventeen percent (17%) of Likely West Virginia Voters approve of a provision in the Build Back Better bill that would offer 10 years of work permits and legal status to approximately 8 million illegal immigrants. Another 14% would only support the proposed 10-year amnesty if it includes provisions to stop future illegal immigration. Thirty-one percent (34%) say no amnesty should be considered until the border is under control, while 29% oppose amnesty for illegal immigrants under any condition. The House of Representatives last week passed the $2-trillion spending bill, which Democrats hope to enact through a “reconciliation” procedure to overcome a Senate filibuster. Only 28% of West Virginia voters generally support the Build Back Better bill, while 55% oppose it. Another 17% are not sure. While 49% of Democratic voters in West Virginia say they support the Build Back Better legislation, the bill is opposed by solid majorities of both Republicans (72%) and voters not affiliated with either major party (58%). Even among Democrats, however, only 33% support the provision that offers legal status and work permits for up to 8 million illegal immigrants without any extra enforcement to gain control of the country’s border with Mexico or to deter future illegal migration.

    Forty-seven percent (47%) of Likely U.S. voters believe media coverage of the Rittenhouse trial was unfair, including 28% who say the coverage was Not At All Fair. Thirty-six percent (36%) think coverage of the Kenosha trial was fair, including 14% who say it was Very Fair. Eighteen percent (18%) are not sure. Rittenhouse was found not guilty of all charges, including first-degree intentional homicide, after arguing that he fired in self-defense during an August 2020 riot in Kenosha. Forty-seven percent (47%) of voters believe media coverage of the case was prejudiced against Rittenhouse, while 15% think coverage was prejudiced in Rittenhouse’s favor. Twenty-three percent (23%) say media coverage of the trial was neutral toward Rittenhouse. Politics clearly influences opinions about the fairness of media coverage. A majority (54%) of Democrats believe media coverage of the Rittenhouse trial was fair, but that belief is shared by only 27% of Republicans and 25% of voters not affiliated with either major party. Fifty-nine percent (59%) of Republicans and 54% of unaffiliated voters think media coverage of the case was unfair, as do 27% of Democrats.

    Thirty percent (30%) of Likely U.S. voters think it would be a good idea for Biden to run for reelection in 2024, while 56% say it would be a bad idea. Fourteen percent (14%) are not sure. Voters are more favorable to a Trump 2024 candidacy, with 41% saying it would be a good idea for the former president to seek the White House again, and 49% saying it would be a bad idea. While most voters aren’t looking forward to a Biden-Trump rematch in 2024, it’s clear that the Republican would be favored. Forty-five percent (45%) of voters would choose Trump if the election were held today, while only 32% would vote to reelect Biden. Seventeen percent (17%) say they’d vote for some other candidate. White House spokeswoman Jen Psaki said Tuesday that Biden plans to seek reelection in 2024. Many Republicans, including Ohio Rep. Jim Jordan, have said they expect Trump to run again in 2024. Only 69% of those who say they voted for Biden last year would vote for him again if the election were held today. Eight percent (8%) of Biden’s 2020 voters would switch to Trump, who would get 83% support from those who voted for him last year. Seventeen percent (17%) of those who voted for Biden and 11% who voted for Trump last year would support some other candidate if the next election were held today.

    Seventy-three percent (73%) of American Adults believe the media cover celebrities too much. Only six percent (6%) think there’s not enough celebrity coverage in the media, while 12% say the amount of coverage is about right. Seventy-seven percent (77%) believe Americans pay too much attention to celebrity news and not enough attention to news that has real impact on their lives. Just nine percent (9%) disagree, while another 14% are not sure. These findings are virtually unchanged since 2017, at the height of the “Me Too” sexual harassment scandals. However, as recently as 2014, the number who thought Americans pay too much attention to celebrity news was 90%.

    Forty-one percent (41%) of American Adults still rank Thanksgiving as one of our nation’s most important holidays, down from a 46% last year. Only 11% view today’s holiday as one of the least important, while 45% rate it somewhere in between. Americans have consistently rated Christmas and Fourth of July as the nation’s most important holidays. Thanksgiving rates fourth place, behind Memorial Day. Eighty percent (80%) of Americans say they have a lot to be thankful for this Thanksgiving, down slightly from 2019. Only 11% say they don’t have a lot to be thankful for this year.

    Thirty-seven percent (37%) of American Adults likely to go shopping on the day after Thanksgiving to take advantage of Black Friday sales deals, with 15% who are Very Likely to do so. That’s up from last year, when 33% planned to shop on Black Friday and nearly as high as the last pre-pandemic survey in 2018. Still, 61% of Americans aren’t likely to hit the stores for Black Friday deals today, including 37% who say it’s Not At All likely they’ll be shopping today. Twenty-one percent (21%) say concerns about the COVID-19 pandemic have affected their plans for Black Friday shopping, but 72% say the pandemic hasn’t affected their plans. Fifty-nine percent (59%) of Americans expect to do at least half of their holiday gift shopping online, including 11% who plan to buy all their holiday gifts on the Internet. Only 14% say they won’t do any of their holiday shopping online.

    And for Biden's job approval numbers over the past week, yet another week with numbers worse across the board than Trump, even with Trump's growing slightly worse. And Biden's difference between his low Total approval and high Total Disapproval widens another point. At this point you can expect the Democrats to be privately panicking, whatever they are saying in public:

    • Strongly Approve: 21% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 49%
    • Total Approve: 41%
    • Total Disapprove: 58%

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 21%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 48%
    • Total Approve: 42%
    • Total Disapprove: 57%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 29%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 42%
    • Total Approve: 47% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 51%

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 27% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 46%
    • Total Approve: 43% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 56% (+1)

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 28%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 47%
    • Total Approve: 43%
    • Total Disapprove: 55%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 29%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 44%
    • Total Approve: 46%
    • Total Disapprove: 54%

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 27% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 41% (+2)
    • Total Approve: 47% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 53% (+3)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 29%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 47% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 52% (+2)

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 33% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 33%
    • Total Approve: 53%
    • Total Disapprove: 46% (+1)
User avatar
By anna
#15200182
In other news, Gallup has President Biden approval rating at 41%.

Corporate media has done a massively good job of downplaying what the Biden administration has accomplished thus far, yet... Biden is still president and Trump is still banned from Twitter, so things could be far worse.


Interesting analysis here by historian Heather Cox Richardson:
https://heathercoxrichardson.substack.c ... er-27-2021

Today, Nate Cohn noted in the New York Times that the policies President Joe Biden and the Democrats are putting in place are hugely popular, and yet Biden’s own popularity numbers have dropped into the low 40s. It’s a weird disconnect that Cohn explains by suggesting that, above all, voters want “normalcy.”

Heaven knows that Biden, who took office in the midst of a pandemic that had crashed the economy and has had to deal with an unprecedented insurgency led by his predecessor, has not been able to provide normalcy.

In her own piece, journalist Magdi Semrau suggests that the media bears at least some of the responsibility for this disconnect, since it has given people a sense of the cost of Biden’s signature measures without specifying what’s in them, focused on negative information (negotiations are portrayed as “disarray,” for example), and ignored that Republicans have refused to participate in any lawmaking, choosing instead simply to be obstructionist. As Semrau puts it: "Democrats want to fix bridges, provide childcare and lower drug costs. Republicans don’t. These are political facts and voters should be aware of them."

To this I would add that Republican attacks on Democrats, which are simple and emotional, get far more traction and thus far more coverage in the mainstream press than the slow and successful navigation of our complicated world.


Much more at the link.
User avatar
By Drlee
#15200187
I completely agree Anna.

The problem is that the Democrats, lead by Biden, want to increase taxes on all Americans and even more so on those in upper income brackets. These are the very people who control media.

The democrats are also wimping out in a way that is absurd. Look at the provisions on immigration in the bills. As Doug64's poll points out, illegals have no clear constituency with either party and the remedies that the Democrats propose, in addition to being political suicide, do not make illegals constituents. Since the bill never grants voting status to these millions of people, they are actually not really being championed in these bills just kicked down the road a decade.

We have a worker shortage in the US but what is being touted does not address that by making more workers available. It just takes the heat of the ones who are here.

Of course in typical Rasmussen style they chose to mention West Virginia, a state that is not a good example for just about anywhere else.

I agree that media should do more to explain the Biden agenda in a more detail and in a favorable light but frankly the Democratic Party/Biden popularity problems are not totally the fault of the media. They are doing a terrible job of telling their own story.

For example, the problem at the border is NOT enforcement. The problem is that there is virtually no workplace enforcement from day one. That is the only place to stop illegal immigration. People come here for jobs. Take away the jobs and the people don't come here. Try to tell every country club in the country that they cannot have anymore illegals to work and let me know how that works out for you. This is just a very sad situation all around.
User avatar
By anna
#15200195
Drlee wrote:I completely agree Anna.

The problem is that the Democrats, lead by Biden, want to increase taxes on all Americans and even more so on those in upper income brackets. These are the very people who control media.


Exactly right, agreed in turn.

The democrats are also wimping out in a way that is absurd. Look at the provisions on immigration in the bills. As Doug64's poll points out, illegals have no clear constituency with either party and the remedies that the Democrats propose, in addition to being political suicide, do not make illegals constituents. Since the bill never grants voting status to these millions of people, they are actually not really being championed in these bills just kicked down the road a decade.

We have a worker shortage in the US but what is being touted does not address that by making more workers available. It just takes the heat of the ones who are here.

Of course in typical Rasmussen style they chose to mention West Virginia, a state that is not a good example for just about anywhere else.

I agree that media should do more to explain the Biden agenda in a more detail and in a favorable light but frankly the Democratic Party/Biden popularity problems are not totally the fault of the media. They are doing a terrible job of telling their own story.


Terrible messaging by Democrats, yes. A prime comparison are ads by The Lincoln Project. These are never Trumpers and/or ex-Republicans who know how to hit hard and hit dirty. While Democrats are saying "let me show you the data" Republicans/Trumpers have mastered and won the meme war, are out there chanting Let's Go Brandon, slamming Kamala Harris for buying a cooking pot, cheering for Kyle Rittenhouse, and screaming at school boards - all things that are getting them what they want. A Biden administration 'killed in its crib' like Steve Bannon wanted, public opinion pushing school censorship in the name of a theory (CRT) most of them can't explain, public officials that simply refuse subpoenas, and gerrymandering the hell out of every state they can.

For example, the problem at the border is NOT enforcement. The problem is that there is virtually no workplace enforcement from day one. That is the only place to stop illegal immigration. People come here for jobs. Take away the jobs and the people don't come here. Try to tell every country club in the country that they cannot have anymore illegals to work and let me know how that works out for you. This is just a very sad situation all around.


It is sad, but for context, I live a mere 20 minutes' drive from the border. Life here goes on as usual, all media chaos coverage aside. None of us in this country would have food on our dinner table without the back-breaking work of the immigrants so many despise. It's been this way for decades and will for decades more, so when will we get some semblance of an amnesty+green card system going? The Democrats aren't doing any better than the Republicans on this, but the both-sidesism stops there. It was only the Trump administration that had *as policy* the intentional separation of families. There's so much anger about that still.
User avatar
By Drlee
#15200204
It is sad, but for context, I live a mere 20 minutes' drive from the border. Life here goes on as usual, all media chaos coverage aside.


I do too. About 30 minutes here. (Arizona.) And you are quite right. I do not see anything like what is being reported. In fact, the border is pretty quiet and illegal crossings way down compared to before.

None of us in this country would have food on our dinner table without the back-breaking work of the immigrants so many despise. It's been this way for decades and will for decades more, so when will we get some semblance of an amnesty+green card system going?


The question of the century. We cannot live without their work. Ironically Ronald Reagan knew this and granted amnesty. An amnesty, I would posit, that has worked very well.

The Democrats aren't doing any better than the Republicans on this, but the both-sidesism stops there.


They are not doing better. Sadly. They have the opportunity to have a real amnesty and I guess you could make the case for saying that the 10 year amnesty they are proposing is better than nothing.

On this, voting rights, health care and the environment I believe that the democrats will come to see their great failing as not squashing the filibuster and pressing ahead with these. These kinds of programs, once passed, are immensely popular. I think that a great many republican elected officials would have kissed McCain for his Obamacare vote, if they dared. Abolishing Obamacare was just a talking point but if the republicans had succeeded in killing it they would have been just like the dog who caught the car.
It was only the Trump administration that had *as policy* the intentional separation of families. There's so much anger about that still.


There is. Mine included. But the problem is that there are a great many Republicans and fellow travelers who believe that the family separation was the fault of the people who put the children in harms way in the first place. You and I know that this is wrong at so many levels that it beggars belief but we are not in a huge majority with our position. If indeed we are in the majority at all.

Who knows Anna? It would be interesting to see what would happen if draconian immigration enforcement actually happened on the job site. Maybe that is the only path to amnesty.

"The Lincoln Project". True heroes. A masterful campaign and one that I am sure single-handedly cost Trump a second term. It was very very close. He very well could have won. Should have won. But I have to ask myself. Did he really lose? He is still calling the shots. Maybe more now than when he was president. I am so disappointed in the Democrats and I know I am not alone. At this point I believe that the mid terms are going to be an ugly thing. I think Trump will emerge stronger than before. I shudder to think what a second Trump presidency will look like with control of the House and Senate. Can you imagine?
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