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#15207950
Doug64 wrote:It seems your answer is "No, I have no interest in explaining how they are push polls, they just are."


No, there is no false dilemma. The question doesn't ask which is a serious problem, it asks which is a bigger problem.


Yes, by wording it that way, they deliberately made it a comparison even though it is not in reality.

Which is pretty much a false dilemma.

And for a large majority of Republicans and a plurality of Independents it was too many criminals being set free, leaving the plurality of Democrats to see too many innocents being arrested as the bigger problem. That takes care of your first two objections.


No. All that means is that a lot of US “likely voters” are too stupid to see it.

As for your third, it is anything but pointless--the Soros-backed Leftist D.A.s that are going easy on criminals are doing serious damage to the Democratic brand, and if those Democrats running the various cities and state parties don't do something about them, they are going to help elect more Republicans.


No.

This is your wishful thinking that it has an impact on votes.

If your best example is voting, then you concede that it has no impact on actual policing.
#15207956
America needs someone as tough and "not Washington" as Donald Trump but without the racism, narcissism, corruption, bullying, and ADHD Someone like Jesse Ventura, or a similar personality. Ventura is an ex-Navy SEAL. He wouldn't fold to Putin like Obama did, and he's not a jerk. He's also not corrupt, he's a patriot.
By late
#15207989
Doug64 wrote:

Soros-backed Leftist D.A.s




You don't have to keep reminding us you're not on this planet.

This is for the others, not the lunatics... punishment is cyclical in the USA. We go through a period of harsh penalties. Then we get horrified at the results, not realising we had done it.

So then we make changes, but never the ones we need to make. So when there is a crisis (like Covid) and things get worse, people demand harsh penalties, and the cycle is complete.

Much of Europe has low recidivism rates because they don't have their head up their butt.
By Doug64
#15208243
Doug64 wrote:Soros-backed Leftist D.A.s

late wrote:You don't have to keep reminding us you're not on this planet.

Thanks for letting us all know that you haven't been paying attention. Try doing an internet search of "Soros-backed district attorneys" to catch up.

Pants-of-dog wrote:Yes, by wording it that way, they deliberately made it a comparison even though it is not in reality.

Which is pretty much a false dilemma.

So you think that any poll asking respondents to rank problems and/or issues in importance are "push polls" because they "deliberately made it a comparison even though it is not in reality."
#15208245
Doug64 wrote:So you think that any poll asking respondents to rank problems and/or issues in importance are "push polls" because they "deliberately made it a comparison even though it is not in reality."


I have no idea what is meant by “push polls”. Since another person brought that up, you should address that to the person who discussed that.

I was explaining why it is a loaded question.

And one of the ways they made this a loaded question was to deliberately distort a complex situation into a false dilemma.
By late
#15208296
Doug64 wrote:
Thanks for letting us all know that you haven't been paying attention. Try doing an internet search of "Soros-backed district attorneys" to catch up.


So you think that any poll asking respondents to rank problems and/or issues in importance are "push polls" because they "deliberately made it a comparison even though it is not in reality."



Whining about the great evil Soros is wackadoodle conspiracy nut territory.

Everybody does it, although Republicans do a lot more of it. It's also not hard to tell, if you're not in denial, when someone is trying to lead you to a conclusion.

Usually you see exaggeration or outright dissembling. Your problem, as I have observed before, is that you like that.
By Doug64
#15208479
@late, let me know when you actually want to discuss something, rather than just toss around ad hominem attacks.

Pants-of-dog wrote:I have no idea what is meant by “push polls”. Since another person brought that up, you should address that to the person who discussed that.

I was explaining why it is a loaded question.

And one of the ways they made this a loaded question was to deliberately distort a complex situation into a false dilemma.

So let me rephrase the question. Do you believe that any poll asking respondents to rank issues by importance, or even just pick which issue they think is more important from a list, are "deliberately distorting a complex situation into a false dilemma"?

Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Twenty-six percent (26%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending January 13, 2022. This week’s finding is down four points from a week ago. Sixty-eight percent (68%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, up three points from a week ago. A year ago at this time, 21% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 72% said it was on the wrong track.

    Thirty-four percent (34%) of American Adults think the country has reached the day when men and women of all races have equal opportunity, just like King preached about in his famous “I Have A Dream” speech more than 50 years ago. Fifty-four percent (54%) disagree and feel the United States has not reached a time of equal opportunity. Thirteen percent (13%) are not sure. This year’s findings are an improvement from 2018, when 62% said America had not yet achieved MLK’s dream. Americans overwhelmingly have a high opinion of the civil rights leader who was assassinated in 1968, with 89% viewing King favorably, including 56% who have a Very Favorable impression of King. However, only 30% rate the official celebration of his birthday as one of the nation’s most important holidays, while 12% regard it as one of the least important holidays. Fifty-four percent (54%) consider it somewhere in between the two. In 2012, 21% rated MLK Day one of the most important holidays.

    Forty-five percent (45%) of Likely U.S. voters believe the highest priority for businesses should be providing individual consumers with high quality products and services at the lowest prices. Another 23% think businesses should prioritize providing good benefits and pay to employees, and 14% say earning a profit to benefit shareholders or owners should be the top priority. Only nine percent (9%) of voters think trying to stop climate change should be the top priority for business, and a mere one percent (1%) think using business resources to pursue social justice causes should be a top priority. The World Economic Forum has promoted the “Great Reset” movement as a global economic strategy in response to the COVID-19 pandemic that seeks to change the priorities of capitalism. Only 29% of voters are familiar with the Great Reset, while 44% say they aren’t familiar with the movement, and 27% are not sure. Of those familiar with the movement, a majority (52%) are opposed to the Great Reset, while only 21% say they Strongly Favor it. A majority (53%) of voters don’t believe international institutions like the United Nations, World Economic Forum, and International Monetary Fund should be influential in creating regulations governing United States businesses. Only 11% believe such international organizations should be Very Influential in the creation of regulations, while another 26% believe international institutions should be Somewhat Influential.

    The 2022 midterm elections are now 294 days away, and Republicans maintain a strong lead in their bid to recapture control of Congress. The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that, if the elections for Congress were held today, 48% of Likely U.S. Voters would vote for the Republican candidate, while 39% would vote for the Democrat. Just four percent (4%) would vote for some other candidate, but another nine percent (9%) are not sure. These findings are unchanged from December. In January 2018, before voters handed Democrats their first House majority in eight years, Democrats held an eight-point advantage (45% to 37%) in the generic ballot question.That margin narrowed as the November 2018 midterms neared, and was a statistical dead heat – Republicans 46%, Democrats 45% – in the final poll before Democrats won a slim House majority while Republicans gained Senate seats to maintain control of that chamber.

    Twelve percent (12%) of Likely U.S. voters rate Biden’s first year in office Very Successful, while another 26% say his first year as president has been Somewhat Successful. Ten percent (10%) believe Biden has been Somewhat Unsuccessful during his first year in office, while 50% rate his first year Very Unsuccessful. Biden campaigned on a promise to unite America, but 57% of voters say the country has become more divided since he took office. Only 12% think the country has become more united during Biden’s first year as president, while 30% believe it has remained about the same. While 68% of Democratic voters rate Biden’s first year as president at least somewhat successful, that view is shared by only 13% of Republicans and 30% of voters not affiliated with either major party. Seventy-five percent (75%) of Republicans and 55% unaffiliated voters say Biden’s first year in office has been Very Unsuccessful, as do 23% of Democrats.

    Seventy-eight percent (78%) of Likely U.S. voters believe politics in Washington has become more partisan over the past year. Only 12% think D.C. politics has become more cooperative, while another 10% are not sure. Most voters don’t expect things to improve during the second year of President Joe Biden’s term. Sixty-nine percent (69%) expect politics in Washington to become even more partisan over the next year, and only 13% think politics in D.C. will become more cooperative, while 18% are not sure. Who is to blame for the lack of cooperation? More voters seem to think it’s Biden, with 54% saying the president is not cooperative enough with congressional Republicans. Fourteen percent (14%) believe Biden is too cooperative with the GOP while 24% think his level of cooperation is about right. Forty-three percent (43%) of voters say congressional Republicans are not cooperative enough with Biden, while 23% believe the GOP is too cooperative with the president and 27% think the Republican level of cooperation is about right.

    Sixty-seven percent (67%) of American Adults don’t have any tattoos, while 21% have two or more tattoos. Among those under 40, however, 46% have at least one tattoo, including 34% who have two or more. Fifteen percent (15%) of adults under 40 have five or more tattoos. About twice as many Americans think tattoos make someone less attractive (28%) than think tattoos make people more attractive (14%) but a majority (52%) say tattoos do not make much difference in how attractive someone is. Again, however, generational differences are apparent, as 27% of those under 40 believe tattoos make someone more attractive, while less than seven percent (7%) of their elders share that belief. Most people with tattoos have no regrets about their choices, as only 18% say they would get rid of their tattoos if they could.

    Eighty-eight percent (88%) of Likely U.S. voters are at least somewhat concerned about inflation, including 62% who are Very Concerned. Similarly, 88% of voters are at least somewhat concerned about violent crime, including 61% who are Very Concerned about the problem. Seventy-three percent (73%) of voters are at least somewhat concerned about illegal immigration, including 52% who say they’re Very Concerned. The level of voter concern on these issues significantly exceeds issues that have higher priority in President Joe Biden’s policy agenda. Fifty-eight percent (58%) of likely voters say they are at least somewhat concerned about COVID-19 and 55% are at least somewhat concerned about climate change. However, these issues are much more concerning to Democratic voters than to the rest of the electorate. Seventy-nine percent (79%) of Democrats are at least somewhat concerned about climate change, including 58% who are Very Concerned about the issue. Only 16% of Republicans and 24% of voters not affiliated with either major party say they’re Very Concerned about climate change. Likewise, while 84% of Democratic voters are at least somewhat concerned about COVID-19, including 58% who are Very Concerned, only 27% of Republicans and 30% of unaffiliated voters say they’re Very Concerned about COVID-19.

    So this week Biden gets some slight improvement, though still much worse than Trump's were at this point in his presidency:

    • Strongly Approve: 19% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 48% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 40%
    • Total Disapprove: 58% (-1)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 20%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 48%
    • Total Approve: 41%
    • Total Disapprove: 58%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 28%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43%
    • Total Approve: 47%
    • Total Disapprove: 52% (+1)

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 29%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 44%
    • Total Approve: 45% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 54% (-1)

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 29%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 44%
    • Total Approve: 45% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 54%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 29%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 44%
    • Total Approve: 45%
    • Total Disapprove: 54%

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 27% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 48% (+2)
    • Total Disapprove: 51% (-2)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 26%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 41%
    • Total Approve: 47% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 53%

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 33%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 34%
    • Total Approve: 52%
    • Total Disapprove: 47% (+1)
#15208487
Doug64 wrote:So let me rephrase the question. Do you believe that any poll asking respondents to rank issues by importance, or even just pick which issue they think is more important from a list, are "deliberately distorting a complex situation into a false dilemma"?


No. Just like not all mammals are cats, not all the examples of asking for comparisons is a loaded question, but this one is.
By late
#15208491
Doug64 wrote:

@late, let me know when you actually want to discuss something, rather than just toss around ad hominem attacks.




Logic does not negate facts.

Soros conspiracy theory is not so much lame as quadrapelgic..
By Doug64
#15209496
Pants-of-dog wrote:No. Just like not all mammals are cats, not all the examples of asking for comparisons is a loaded question, but this one is.

So what makes those questions "loaded" when others aren't?

late wrote:Soros conspiracy theory is not so much lame as quadrapelgic..

What "Soros conspiracy theory"? Soros poured unprecedented amounts on money into electing district attorneys, and the policies of those DA's have been disastrous. And it's hardly a conspiracy when it's a single person.

Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Twenty-eight percent (28%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending January 20, 2022. This week’s finding is up two points from a week ago. Sixty-seven percent (67%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, down one point from a week ago. A year ago at this time, 24% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 66% said it was on the wrong track.

    The Rasmussen Reports Immigration Index for the week of January 16-20 2022 was 85.9, down three points from the previous poll's 88.9. The Immigration Index has been under the baseline in every survey since Election Day last year, and reached a record low of 82.3 in late March 2021. The index is now nearly 20 points below where it was in late October 2020, indicating voters are looking for tighter immigration control from President Joe Biden’s administration.

    Seven percent (7%) of Likely U.S. voters believe the economy is Very Fair, generally speaking. Another 26% think the economy is Somewhat Fair. Twenty-nine percent (29%) say the economy is Not Very Fair and 31% view the economy as Not At All Fair. Those findings reflect a sharp shift since 2019, when 56% of voters felt the economy was at least somewhat fair, and only 15% thought it was Not At All Fair. A near-majority of voters (48%) now view the U.S. economy as unfair to blacks and Hispanics, including 20% who say the economy is Not At All Fair to those groups. That’s a marked change from 2016, when a solid majority (56%) believed the economy was at least somewhat fair to blacks and Hispanics. Voters are about evenly divided on whether the economy is fair to women, with 46% saying it is at least somewhat fair to women, and 48% seeing the U.S. economy as unfair to women. In 2016, 61% of voters believed the economy was at least somewhat fair to women.

    Fifty percent (50%) of Likely U.S. voters believe it was a good thing that the bill supported by President Joe Biden was defeated in the Senate. Only 32% think the defeat of the bill was a bad thing, while another 11% say the bill’s defeat will not make much difference. After last week’s vote, Republican Sen. Susan Collins of Maine announced she was working with other senators on "an election reform bill that is truly bipartisan … that would help restore confidence in our elections." Sixty-three percent (63%) of voters agree Congress should pass such a bill, including 35% who Strongly Agree. Twenty-four percent (24%) disagree and another 13% are not sure. Concerns about election integrity have persisted since 2020, as 64% of voters say it’s more important to make sure there is not cheating in elections, compared to 33% who say it’s more important to make it easier for everybody to vote. Sixty-six percent (66%) reject claims that laws requiring photo identification at the polls discriminate against some voters. Only 26% think voters ID laws are discriminatory. Previous surveys have shown high levels of support for voter ID laws.

    Thirty-one percent (31%) of Likely U.S. voters think that if Russia attacks Ukraine, U.S. combat troops should be sent to help defend Ukraine. Thirty-six percent (36%) are against sending American troops to Ukraine, while 33% are undecided. Eighty percent (80%) of voters are concerned that Russia may launch a military invasion of Ukraine, including 43% who are Very Concerned – slightly more than in December. And most voters believe President Joe Biden has mishandled U.S.-Russia relations. Fifty percent (50%) give Biden a poor rating on his handling of U.S. policy toward Russia, while 12% rate him fair on his handling of Russia policy. Nineteen percent (19%) say Biden’s handling of Russia policy has been good, and just 11% rate him excellent on Russia policy.

    Thirty-nine percent (39%) of American Adults who work full-time believe they will be earning more money a year from today. That’s down from a peak of 54% in 2018, and the lowest finding since 2013. Seventeen percent (17%) of full-time workers expect they’ll be earning less a year from now, while 38% expect their wages to remain the same. Fifty-six percent (56%) of working adults say they have a better opportunity for career advancement by staying within their current company. That finding is unchanged from 2018. Twenty-nine percent (29%) now think the best opportunity for career advancement is by going to work for someone else. Fifteen percent (15%) are undecided. Among all adults, 50% say they have a full-time job, down from 58% in 2018. Forty-seven percent now (47%) say they are not currently employed full-time.

    Fifty-five percent (55%) of Likely U.S. voters believe Democrats in Congress are too liberal on most issues. Sixteen percent (16%) think congressional Democrats are too moderate, while 20% think their policies are about right. By comparison, 36% of voters say congressional Republicans are too conservative, 21% think they’re too moderate and 33% believe the GOP in Congress is about right. After the defeat of Democrat-backed election reform legislation in the Senate last week, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell said: “The American people are closely divided. ... There’s not a mandate to fundamentally transform America into something it’s never been. That’s not what the voters voted for." Sixty-four percent (64%) of voters agree with McConnell’s quote, including 42% who Strongly Agree. Twenty percent (20%) disagree, and another 16% are not sure.

    Fifty-nine percent (59%) of Likely U.S. voters expect Biden to keep his promise by nominating a black woman to fill the vacancy on the Supreme Court created by the retirement of Justice Stephen Breyer. Only 19% think Biden will break his campaign promise, while 21% are not sure. However, only 26% of voters think it’s a good idea to make race and gender the basis of choosing appointments to the Supreme Court. Sixty-one percent (61%) believe picking justices on the basis of race and gender is a bad idea. Another 14% are not sure. Thirty-seven percent (37%) of voters believe the Supreme Court is doing a good or excellent job, an increase from the 33% who felt that way last September, but still below the all-time high of 43% in 2018 and 2019. Twenty-four percent (24%) now say the Supreme Court is doing a poor job, down from 30% last September.

    Ten percent (10%) of American Adults rate media coverage of the ongoing coronavirus crisis excellent, and another 25% rate the media’s COVID-19 coverage good. That’s a decline in approval from July, when 42% rated the media’s coverage of the pandemic excellent or good. The number who say the media is doing a poor job is now 40%, up from 29% in July. Fifty percent (50%) now think the media have exaggerated the threat of coronavirus, up from 44% in July. Thirty-eight percent (38%) don’t think the media have exaggerated the COVID-19 threat and another 12% aren’t sure. Less than half (40%) of Americans now think the media are reporting accurately about the safety and effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines, down from 46% in July. Forty-five percent (45%) believe the media’s vaccine reporting is not accurate – up from 38% in July – and another 16% are not sure.

    And Biden's numbers continue in the pits. The MSM(D) really have their work cut out for them, putting lipstick on this pig:

    • Strongly Approve: 19%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 49% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 41% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 58%

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 20%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 48%
    • Total Approve: 41%
    • Total Disapprove: 58%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 27% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43%
    • Total Approve: 46% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 52%

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 29%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 45% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 44% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 55% (+1)

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 29%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 44%
    • Total Approve: 44% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 54%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 29%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 44%
    • Total Approve: 45%
    • Total Disapprove: 54%

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 25% (-2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 42% (+2)
    • Total Approve: 46% (-2)
    • Total Disapprove: 54% (+3)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 26%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 41%
    • Total Approve: 47%
    • Total Disapprove: 53%

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 32% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 34%
    • Total Approve: 52%
    • Total Disapprove: 47%
By Doug64
#15209658
Pants-of-dog wrote:@Doug64

Please reread my post where I lay out the reasons why that was a loaded question.

Yes, you stated that "And one of the ways they made this a loaded question was to deliberately distort a complex situation into a false dilemma." You offered no evidence to back up that claim, and have provided no explanation for how it differs from other polls that ask respondents to rank issues by importance that you say aren't "loaded questions." So please provide both.
#15209720
Doug64 wrote:Yes, you stated that "And one of the ways they made this a loaded question was to deliberately distort a complex situation into a false dilemma." You offered no evidence to back up that claim, and have provided no explanation for how it differs from other polls that ask respondents to rank issues by importance that you say aren't "loaded questions." So please provide both.


I already addressed this.

The rest of that post explained it.
User avatar
By Rancid
#15209742
Unthinking Majority wrote:America needs someone as tough and "not Washington" as Donald Trump but without the racism, narcissism, corruption, bullying, and ADHD Someone like Jesse Ventura, or a similar personality. Ventura is an ex-Navy SEAL. He wouldn't fold to Putin like Obama did, and he's not a jerk. He's also not corrupt, he's a patriot.


Yea, I could see that working. Hard to find that though.

Also, does anyone on pofo actually look at these poll numbers Doug obsesses over?
By Doug64
#15210676
Rancid wrote:Also, does anyone on pofo actually look at these poll numbers Doug obsesses over?

Considering that this thread is getting over 134 views for every post, I'd say quite a few are dropping in to check them out.

Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Twenty-nine percent (29%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending January 27, 2022. This week’s finding is up one point from a week ago. Sixty-six percent (66%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, down one point from a week ago. A year ago at this time, 35% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 59% said it was on the wrong track.

    Fifty percent (50%) of Likely U.S. voters support the impeachment of Biden, including 33% who Strongly Support it. Forty-five percent (45%) are opposed to impeaching Biden, including 33% who Strongly Oppose it. In September, Republicans led by Ohio Rep. Bob Gibbs filed articles of impeachment against Biden, citing his immigration policy and his failure in Afghanistan, among other reasons. Seventy-four percent (74%) of Republican voters, 34% of Democrats and 42% of voters not affiliated with either major party at least somewhat support Biden’s impeachment. After the botched withdrawal from Afghanistan in August, 60% of voters agreed with South Carolina Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham that Biden deserved to be impeached. If the GOP wins a majority in the House of Representatives in the November midterms, 45% of voters believe it is likely Republicans will impeach Biden, including 22% who think impeachment is Very Likely. Forty-two percent (42%) don’t think Republicans are likely to impeach Biden, including 10% who say it’s Not At All Likely, while another 12% are not sure.

    Thirty percent (30%) of American Adults say this winter has been worse where they live than it has been in past years. That’s higher than the 15% who said winter was worse in 2015, but well below the 62% who said so in 2014. Sixty percent (60%) say this year’s winter has not been worse, and 11% are not sure. Fifty-nine percent (59%) think it’s likely that climate change is causing more extreme weather, including severe snow storms in winter. That includes 23% who believe it’s Very Likely climate change causes severe winter weather. Thirty-four percent (34%) don’t think it’s likely that more extreme winter weather is caused by climate change. A majority (55%) of Americans believe the media make the weather sound worse than it really is, while 30% don’t think the media are guilty of hyping bad weather.

    Sixty percent (60%) of American Adults have a favorable impression of Amazon, including 21% whose view of the online retail giant is Very Favorable. That’s down from October 2018, when 68% had a favorable view of Amazon. Thirty-two percent (32%) now view Amazon unfavorably, including 12% who have a Very Unfavorable impression. Sixty-nine percent (69%) are concerned that Amazon’s continuing success will force smaller Mom and Pop stores and larger box stores out of business in their area. That includes 32% who are Very Concerned that Amazon could put local stores out of business. Just 26% aren’t concerned about Amazon’s impact on local businesses. In October 2018, 64% were concerned Amazon’s success could force local stores out of business, including 25% who were Very Concerned.

    Fifty-four percent (54%) of Likely U.S. voters think Biden will be remembered as one of the worst presidents in American history. Only 15% believe Biden will rank in history as one of America’s best presidents, while 25% think his presidency will be remembered as about average. Voters have a much higher opinion of former President Donald Trump. Forty-one percent (41%) think Trump will be remembered as one of America’s best presidents, compared to 43% who believe Trump will rank as one of the worst presidents in U.S. history, and 12% who say Trump’s presidency was about average. Voters also rate former President Barack Obama higher than Biden. Thirty-four percent (34%) believe Obama will be remembered as one of the best presidents in American history, 33% say Obama is among the worst presidents and 30% think Obama’s presidency was about average.

    The president earned a monthly job approval of 40% in January, two points down from December. Fifty-eight percent (58%) disapproved of his job performance in January, up one point from December. Donald Trump’s monthly approval ran from a high of 51% in February 2017, his first full month in the White House, to a low of 42% in August 2017. In December 2020, his final full month in office, Trump earned a monthly job approval of 47%. Fifty-one percent (51%) disapproved.

    Twenty-eight percent (28%) of Likely U.S. voters think the Biden administration’s immigration policy is better than the Trump administration. Fifty-two percent (52%) say Biden’s immigration policy is worse than Trump’s, while 15% believe the policies of the two administrations are about the same. During a White House meeting with the National Governors Association this week, Biden said “one of the fundamental things we've got to do” about illegal immigrants is to “figure out why they're leaving [their home countries] in the first place," Most voters reject that idea, however. In dealing with illegal immigration, only 34% believe it is more important to figure out why people in other countries are coming to the United States illegally. Fifty-nine percent (59%) think taking strong measures for border enforcement is more important. Seventy-eight percent (78%) of voters think the issue of illegal immigration will be important in this year’s congressional elections, including 53% who say the issue will be Very Important in November. Just 20% don’t think illegal immigration will be an important issue in the midterms.

    Thirty-nine percent (39%) of American Adults believe public schools should make COVID-19 vaccination mandatory for students, while 53% are against requiring students to get vaccinated. Those findings are little changed from November, when 55% opposed forcing the COVID-19 vaccine on students. However, while 74% of Republicans and 62% of those unaffiliated with either major party are opposed to making COVID-19 vaccination mandatory for students, 65% of Democrats think schools should require students to get the vaccine. This finding is consistent with last month’s survey that found a majority of Democrats embrace restrictive policies for dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic, including punitive measures against those who haven’t gotten the vaccine.

    Fifty-four percent (54%) of American Adults believe this was the right time for Brady to retire, while 14% think the seven-time Super Bowl champion should have tried to play at least one more season in the NFL. Another 33% are not sure. Brady has been called the “GOAT” (greatest of all time), but only 41% of Americans believe Brady is the greatest quarterback in football history. Twenty-four percent (24%) say he wasn’t the greatest, and 34% are not sure. Brady won an NFL record six Super Bowls during his 18 seasons as starting QB for the New England Patriots. Brady got his first Super Bowl ring in 2002, when he led the Patriots to a 20-17 upset of the Rams. In 2019, Brady became the oldest quarterback ever to win a Super Bowl, when the Patriots beat the Rams 13-3. After signing with Tampa Bay, Brady led the Buccaneers to a 31-9 Super Bowl victory over the Kansas City Chiefs last year – although our survey found the Chiefs were the pregame favorites. This season, the Buccaneers were eliminated in the NFC divisional playoffs by the Rams.

    And Biden's numbers continue in the pits. The MSM(D)'s lipstick-pig problem also continues:

    • Strongly Approve: 21% (+2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 47% (-2)
    • Total Approve: 41%
    • Total Disapprove: 57% (-1)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 20%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 48%
    • Total Approve: 40% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 58%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 27%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43%
    • Total Approve: 46%
    • Total Disapprove: 52%

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 31% (+2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 42% (-3)
    • Total Approve: 45% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 54% (-1)

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 30% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 44%
    • Total Approve: 44%
    • Total Disapprove: 54%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 29%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 44%
    • Total Approve: 45%
    • Total Disapprove: 54%

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 30% (+5)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 39% (-3)
    • Total Approve: 49% (+3)
    • Total Disapprove: 50% (-4)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 27% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 47%
    • Total Disapprove: 52% (-1)

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 32%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 34%
    • Total Approve: 52%
    • Total Disapprove: 47%
User avatar
By BlutoSays
#15211656
Jeez, even the sex crimes network is having to admit it! :eh:

CNN Poll: Most Biden detractors say he's done nothing they like since becoming president

By Jennifer Agiesta and Ariel Edwards-Levy, CNN
Updated 12:09 PM ET, Thu February 10, 2022


(CNN)Nearly 6 in 10 Americans disapprove of how Joe Biden is handling his presidency, with most of that group saying there's literally nothing Biden has done since taking office that they approve of. The finding, from a CNN Poll conducted by SSRS in January and February, highlights the entrenched politics driving the nation at the start of the midterm year, with little agreement across party lines on priorities for the government or how to handle the coronavirus pandemic.

The President's ratings have fallen across the board, the survey found. Just 41% approved of the way he's handling his job while 58% disapproved, a significant drop from his approval numbers in CNN polling last year. Just 36% of independents and 9% of Republicans approved. Although his approval rating still stood at 83% among Democrats, that was down from 94% late last summer. Biden also continues to have more strong detractors than he does fervent supporters: 41% of Americans disapproved strongly of his performance as President versus 15% who strongly approved. Some of the shift in Biden's numbers comes from a change in Americans' partisan tilt: Republicans and Democrats were about at parity in the new poll, with fewer identifying as Democrats than in other recent CNN polling.

Story continues: https://www.cnn.com/2022/02/10/politics ... index.html
By Doug64
#15211807
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty percent (30%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending February 3, 2022. This week’s finding is up one point from a week ago. Sixty-four percent (64%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, down two points from a week ago. A year ago at this time, 35% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 58% said it was on the wrong track.

    The Rasmussen Reports Immigration Index for the week of January 30-February 3, 2022, increased to 90.2, up more than four points from 85.9 two weeks earlier. The Immigration Index has been under the baseline in every survey since Election Day last year, and reached a record low of 82.3 in late March 2021. The index is now more than 15 points below where it was in late October 2020, indicating voters are looking for tighter immigration control from President Joe Biden’s administration.

    Sixty-three percent (63%) of American Adults believe the United States needs stricter enforcement of existing gun control laws. Twenty-eight percent (28%) disagree. In an appearance last week with New York City Mayor Eric Adams, Biden called on Congress to “do its part … pass universal background checks, ban assault weapons and high-capacity magazines, close loopholes, and … repeal the liability shield for gun manufacturers.” However, only 42% of Americans think the United States needs stricter gun control laws, while 49% say the country does not. As to which approach would do more to reduce gun violence in America, 54% say stricter enforcement of existing gun laws while 26% say passing new gun control laws and 18% are not sure.

    Forty-eight percent (48%) of Likely U.S. voters rarely or never watch CNN, while another 23% say they only watch occasionally. Eight percent (8%) of voters watch CNN once a week, 11% say they watch several times a week and another eight percent (8%) watch CNN every day. Thirty-three percent (33%) of voters agree that CNN is what its slogan declares, “The Most Trusted Name in News,” including 10% who Strongly Agree. Fifty-eight percent (58%) don’t agree that CNN is “The Most Trusted Name in News,” including 42% who Strongly Disagree with that description. Zucker was forced to resign from CNN last week for failing to disclose an affair with the network’s network’s executive vice president Allison Gollust. Eighteen percent (18%) of voters think Zucker’s resignation is good for CNN, 10% think it’s bad for the network, and 58% think Zucker’s resignation will not make much difference. Another 14% are not sure. Distrust of the news media remains high, as 58% of voters agree with former President Donald Trump’s statement that the media are “truly the enemy of the people,” a finding unchanged since last July. Twenty-nine percent (29%) now Strongly Agree with Trump’s description of the media, slightly down from July. Thirty-seven percent (37%) of voters disagree with the claim that the media are “the enemy of the people,” including 22% who Strongly Disagree.

    Fifty-eight percent (58%) of Likely U.S. voters believe a law permitting an appointed state oversight committee with the ability to remove state attorneys from office if they won’t prosecute violent crimes would improve safety. Just 21% disagree, while another 20% are not sure. Fifty-four percent (54%) of voters believe safety would be improved by a law permitting state attorney generals to appoint a special prosecutor if the local district attorney refuses to carry out their responsibilities. Twenty-four percent (24%) disagree and another 22% are not sure.

    Fifty-four percent (54%) of American Adults agree with ABC’s decision to suspend Goldberg, including 36% who Strongly Agree. Thirty-four percent (34%) disagree with ABC’s suspension of Goldberg, including 15% who Strongly Disagree. Another 12% are not sure. The two-week suspension came after the January 31 episode of “The View,” when Goldberg sparked outrage by saying the Holocaust during World War II was “not about race” because both Germans and Jews are white.Sixty-eight percent (68%) of Americans disagree with Goldberg’s comment, including 52% who Strongly Disagree. However, 22% agree with Goldberg that the Holocaust was “not about race.” Goldberg’s suspension from ABC was criticized as an example of “cancel culture” by comedian Bill Maher, among others. Sixty-seven percent (67%) of Americans believe cancel culture – defined as a form of censorship that harms the careers and reputations of public figures for doing or saying things that are considered offensive – has gotten out of control. Just 14% don’t think cancel culture is out of control, while another 19% are not sure.

    Eighteen percent (18%) of Likely U.S. voters rate Congress excellent or good at doing its job, while 52% give Congress a poor rating. Bad as it is, that’s actually a slight improvement since last July, when 17% gave Congress an excellent or good rating, and 54% said Congress was doing a poor job. Thirty percent (30%) of voters believe it is likely that Congress will seriously address the most important problems facing our nation, including just eight percent (8%) who think it’s Very Likely. A majority (66%) don’t think it’s likely Congress will seriously address important problems, including 34% who believe it’s Not At All Likely. What is the most important problem Congress should address? Twenty-four percent (24%) of voters say illegal immigration, followed closely by inflation (23%). Eighteen percent (18%) believe violent crime is the most important issue for Congress to deal with and 15% think COVID-19 is the top issue. Only nine percent (9%) say climate change is the most important problem for Congress to deal with, which is fewer than the 10% who say “some other issue” is the top priority for Congress.

    Forty-eight percent (48%) of American Adults who regularly follow professional football believe the Rams will win the NFL championship game Sunday, while 40% think the Bengals will win the Super Bowl. Twelve percent (12%) are not sure. Thirty-three percent (33%) say football is their favorite sport to follow, down from 41% in 2017 and 20 points lower than in 2012. Baseball and basketball are now tied for second-most favorite sport, at 13% each, followed by soccer (6%), auto racing (5%), hockey and golf (both 4%) and tennis (2%). Ten percent (10%) say some other sport is their favorite and another 10% are not sure. Thirty-eight percent (38%) of adults say they follow professional football on television, in person, on the radio or online at least once a week. Another 24% follow professional football occasionally, while 34% rarely or never follow professional football. This year’s Super Bowl will be the first since seven-time Super Bowl-winning quarterback Tom Brady announced his retirement. Among fans who follow professional football at least weekly, 55% say Brady is the greatest quarterback in football history, and only 28% disagree, while another 18% are not sure. Last week, when we asked the same question of all American Adults, only 41% said Brady was the greatest ever.

    Economic confidence fell to 96.5 in this month’s Rasmussen Reports Economic Index, eight-tenths of a point lower than January. This second consecutive month of declines brings the index to its lowest point since May 2020. Enthusiasm about the economy surged under former President Donald Trump, reaching as high as 147.8 in January 2020 before tumbling after the coronavirus lockdown threw Americans out of work and closed many businesses. By November 2020, it had recovered to 126.4, but dropped sharply in the three months after President Joe Biden was elected. The index fell to 97.8 in February 2021 before beginning a three-month rebound that took the index to 123.7 in May, followed by a five-month streak of declines. Thirty-one percent (31%) of American Adults rate the economy as excellent or good this month, up three points from last month, but 11 points below the 42% mark in November 2020. The number who rate the economy as poor was 42%, two points more than January. Twenty-two percent (22%) now think the economy is getting better, up three points from last month. Fifty-eight percent (58%) expect a worsening economy, up one point from January. Fifteen percent (15%) now see things staying about the same, down four points from last month. There has been a remarkable reversal since President Biden was elected, as Democrats are now more bullish on the economy than Republicans. Forty-five percent (45%) of Democrats view the economy as good or excellent, compared to 21% of Republicans and 26% of those not affiliated with either major party. GOP confidence has declined 53 points since November 2020, when 74% of Republicans had a positive view of the economy, while Democrats’ confidence has risen 13 points from 32% before Biden’s election.

    And Biden's numbers continue in the pits, though there has been some improvement over the past couple weeks. Still doing worse than Trump, but Trump was going through one of his occasional periods when he was almost popular:

    • Strongly Approve: 22% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 46% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 42% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 56% (-1)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 20%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 48%
    • Total Approve: 41% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 58%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 27%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43%
    • Total Approve: 46%
    • Total Disapprove: 52%

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 35% (+4)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 41% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 49% (+4)
    • Total Disapprove: 50% (-4)

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 31% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 46% (+2)
    • Total Disapprove: 53% (-1)

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 29%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 44%
    • Total Approve: 45%
    • Total Disapprove: 54%

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 26% (-4)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 46% (-3)
    • Total Disapprove: 53% (+3)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 27%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 47%
    • Total Disapprove: 52%

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 32%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 35% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 52%
    • Total Disapprove: 47%
By Doug64
#15213011
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty percent (30%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending February 10, 2022. This week’s finding is the same as a week ago. Sixty-four percent (64%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, also identical from a week ago. A year ago at this time, 38% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 55% said it was on the wrong track.

    Fifty-three percent (53%) of American Adults say dinner with someone special is what they would like most for Valentine’s Day. Just 17% say they’d prefer chocolate candy, while 12% would like flowers the best. That preference hasn’t changed much since 2015, when 61% said dinner with someone special was their Valentine’s Day favorite. Just 12% of Americans think Valentine’s Day is one of the nation’s most important holidays while 51% say it’s one of the least important and 35% place it somewhere in between. Last year, only eight percent (8%) rated Valentine’s Day as one of the most important holidays. Americans consistently rank Christmas as the most important holiday, followed by the Fourth of July, with Valentine’s Day trailing far behind near the bottom of the list. Forty-one percent (41%) of Americans say they look forward to Valentine’s Day, but another 19% say it’s a day they dread, while 40% are not sure.

    Fifty-nine percent (59%) of Likely U.S. voters support the Canadian trucker protest, including 42% who Strongly Support the “Freedom Convoy.” Thirty-three percent (33%) of voters oppose the trucker protest against Canada’s COVID-19 restrictions, including 21% who Strongly Oppose the protest. On Monday, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau invoked Canada’s Emergencies Act to quell the protests by truck drivers and others who have paralyzed Ottawa and blocked border crossings in anger over the country’s COVID-19 restrictions. However, most U.S. voters believe Trudeau should respond by meeting the truckers’ demands. Fifty-one percent (51%) say Trudeau should end Canada’s COVID-19 restrictions, while 35% don’t think Trudeau should concede to protest leaders by ending the restriction. Another 14% are not sure. There have been suggestions that American truckers should stage protests like Canada’s “Freedom Convoy.” Fifty-four percent (54%) of U.S. voters say they would support trucker protests against COVID-19 restrictions in the United States, including 36% who would Strongly Support such protests. Thirty-eight percent (38%) would oppose U.S. trucker protests against COVID-19 restrictions, including 27% who would Strongly Oppose such protests in the United States.

    Twenty-eight percent (28%) of American Adults believe that the U.S. economy will be stronger a year from now. Forty-five percent (45%) think the economy will be weaker in a year, and another 16% expect the economy to be about the same. Ten percent (10%) are not sure. These findings are essentially unchanged from September. Only 18% of Americans now believe today’s children will be better off than their parents – down from 28% in 2018. Fifty-nine percent (59%) do not think today’s children will be better off, up from 47% in 2018, while another 23% are undecided. Pessimism about the economic future peaked during Barack Obama’s presidency; in September 2011, 67% of Americans believed children would not be better off than their parents. For most of Obama’s second term, one-third or less of Americans said they expected a stronger economy, but that number jumped to 50% after President Donald Trump’s inauguration in January 2017.

    Fifty-eight percent (58%) of Likely U.S. voters believe masks are effective at preventing the spread of COVID-19, including 31% who think masks are Very Effective. Thirty-nine percent (39%) don’t think masks are effective at preventing spread of the coronavirus, including 20% who think masks are Not At All Effective against the disease. The political divisions on the issue are remarkable. While 48% of Democratic voters believe masks are Very Effective against COVID-19, that opinion is shared by only 19% of Republicans and 25% of voters unaffiliated with either major party. Thirty percent (30%) of Republicans and 23% of unaffiliated voters think masks are Not At All Effective in stopping COVID-19, but just nine percent (9%) of Democrats share that view. Nearly half (49%) of all voters believe people should be required to wear masks in public places to prevent the spread of COVID-19, while 42% do not. Again, the issue divides voters largely along party lines. Seventy-four percent (74%) of Democrats support mask requirements in public places, but only 33% of Republicans and 38% of unaffiliated voters agree. Sixty-two percent (62%) of Republicans, 47% of unaffiliated voters and 20% of Democrats are against mask requirements. Findings are very similar on requiring children to wear masks in school to protect against COVID-19. Forty-eight percent (48%) of likely voters support mask mandates in schools, with 44% opposed. Seventy-two percent (72%) of Democrats believe schools should require children to wear masks, but only 31% of Republicans and 40% of unaffiliated voters agree.

    Forty-two percent (42%) of Likely U.S. voters are confident Biden is physically and mentally up to the job of being President of the United States, including 27% who are Very Confident in Biden’s ability. Fifty-six percent (56%) are not confident that Biden is up to the job, including 45% who are Not At All Confident in his ability. Those findings are unchanged from our October survey. Last week, 38 Republican members of Congress – including Texas Rep. Ronny Jackson, a former presidential physician – sent a letter to Biden expressing concern that his “mental decline and forgetfulness have become more apparent over the past two years.”Sixty-three (63%) of voters agree Biden’s “mental decline” has “become apparent,” including 47% who Strongly Agree. Only 31% disagree that Biden’s “mental decline” is apparent, including 22% who Strongly Disagree. The letter from Jackson and his colleagues urged Biden to take a cognitive test and make the results public, as then-President Donald Trump did in 2018. Sixty-six percent (66%) of voters believe Biden should take a test of his cognitive abilities and release the results, while 26% disagree.

    In a court filing last week, Durham alleged that Clinton’s campaign paid an internet company to “infiltrate” servers at Trump Tower and the White House in order to link Trump to Russia. A new national telephone and online survey by Rasmussen Reports finds that 68% of Likely U.S. voters believe this accusation is important, including 50% who think it’s Very Important. Twenty-seven percent (27%) don’t think Duham’s allegation against Clinton’s campaign is important, including 16% who say it’s Not At All Important. In response to the Durham filing, Trump issued a statement saying it was “a scandal far greater in scope and magnitude than Watergate and those who were involved in and knew about this spying operation should be subject to criminal prosecution.” Sixty-five percent (65%) of voters agree with the quote from Trump, including 48% who Strongly Agree. Twenty-eight percent (28%) disagree with the Trump statement, including 21% who Strongly Disagree.

    The 2022 midterm elections are now 263 days away, and Republicans have a 13-point lead in their bid to recapture control of Congress. The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that, if the elections for Congress were held today, 50% of Likely U.S. Voters would vote for the Republican candidate, while 37% would vote for the Democrat. Just four percent (4%) would vote for some other candidate, but another nine percent (9%) are not sure. Republicans have added four points to their congressional advantage since January, when they led 48%-39%. The current 13-point GOP lead matches the November survey, but Democrats are now one point lower than they were in November. In January 2018, before voters handed Democrats their first House majority in eight years, Democrats held an eight-point advantage (45% to 37%) in the generic ballot question. That margin narrowed as the November 2018 midterms neared, and was a statistical dead heat – Republicans 46%, Democrats 45% – in the final poll before Democrats won a slim House majority while Republicans gained Senate seats to maintain control of that chamber.

    And there goes Biden's improvement over the past couple weeks:

    • Strongly Approve: 20% (-2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 47% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 41% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 58% (+2)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 20%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 48%
    • Total Approve: 41%
    • Total Disapprove: 58%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 27%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43%
    • Total Approve: 46%
    • Total Disapprove: 52%

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 32% (-3)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 42% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 48% (-1)
    • Total Disapprove: 51% (+1)

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 32% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43%
    • Total Approve: 46%
    • Total Disapprove: 53%

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 30% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 44%
    • Total Approve: 45%
    • Total Disapprove: 54%

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 25% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 39% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 48% (+2)
    • Total Disapprove: 51% (-2)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 27%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 47%
    • Total Disapprove: 52%

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 32%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 35%
    • Total Approve: 52%
    • Total Disapprove: 47%
By Doug64
#15214832
Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Twenty-nine percent (29%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending February 17, 2022. This week’s finding is down one point from a week ago. Sixty-six percent (66%) of voters believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, up two points from a week ago. A year ago at this time, 34% said the United States was heading in the right direction, while 59% said it was on the wrong track.

    The Rasmussen Reports Immigration Index for the week of February 13-17, 2022, decreased to 86.4, down nearly four points from 90.2 two weeks earlier. The Immigration Index has been under the baseline in every survey since Election Day last year, and reached a record low of 82.3 in late March 2021. The index is now more than 19 points below where it was in late October 2020, indicating voters are looking for tighter immigration control from President Joe Biden’s administration.

    Thirty-six percent (36%) of American Adults say there should be a separate federal holiday for Lincoln’s birthday. Forty-eight percent (48%) are against making Lincoln’s birthday a separate holiday, and 16% are not sure. These findings have barely changed since last year. Support for making Lincoln’s birthday a holiday has slightly increased since 2018, when 30% were in favor of honoring Lincoln with a separate holiday. In general, Americans oppose the creation of more federal holidays. Despite attacks from historical revisionists in recent years, admiration of Lincoln remains high and Washington’s popularity has actually increased. Eighty-two percent (82%) of Americans have a favorable opinion of Washington, including 56% who have a Very Favorable opinion of our nation’s first president. Last year, 77% regarded Washington favorably. Only 14% now have an unfavorable view of Washington. Eighty-four percent (84%) have a favorable opinion of Lincoln, including 57% who have a Very Favorable view of the 16th president who guided the country through the Civil War in the 1860s. Those findings are nearly identical to last year’s survey. Just seven percent (7%) of Americans now view Lincoln unfavorably.

    Sixty-five percent (65%) of Likely U.S. voters believe the problem of violent crime in America is getting worse. Only 11% think the crime problem is getting better, while another 22% say violent crime is staying about the same. These findings have changed only slightly since December. Eighty-three percent (83%) believe the issue of violent crime will be important in this year’s congressional elections, including 56% who say the crime issue will be Very Important. Only 16% don’t think the issue of violent crime will be important in the November elections. Fifty percent (50%) of voters say the Biden administration's policy for dealing with violent crime is worse than the Trump administration's policy, while 29% think the Biden crime policy is better than Trump’s. Another 17% believe the crime policy of the two administrations is about the same.

    Fourteen percent (14%) of Likely Democratic voters believe their party should be more like Harris, while 56% think the party should be more like Biden. Similarly, while 58% of Democrats say Biden has been good for the Democratic Party, only 50% say the same for Harris. Among all Likely Voters, opinions of both Biden and Harris are much lower. Thirty-five percent (35%) of voters believe Biden has been good for the Democratic Party, while 43% say Biden has been bad for the party. Just 30% think Harris has been good for the Democrats and 46% say she has been bad for the party. Not surprisingly, strong majorities of Republican voters think both Biden (67%) and Harris (70%) have been bad for the Democratic Party. Among voters not affiliated with either major party, 25% think Biden has been good for the Democrats and 20% think Harris has been good for her party.

    Forty-four percent (44%) of American Adults believe raising the hourly minimum wage would help the U.S. economy, down from 48% last April. Thirty-three percent (33%) think raising the minimum wage will hurt the economy instead, while 12% say it will have no impact. Eleven percent (11%) are undecided. The U.S. Senate has blocked legislation, passed by the House of Representatives, to increase the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour; 30 states and the District of Columbia have enacted minimum wages higher than the current federal minimum. Only 35% of Americans believe the minimum wage should be $15 an hour or more, but just 12% think it should stay at $7.25. A majority (56%) think the minimum wage should be at least $12.50 an hour and adding in those who think it should be $10.50 an hour (15%) or $9.50 an hour (12%) means that 83% would support an increase to at least $9.50 an hour.

    Forty-seven percent (47%) of Likely Republicans voters choose Trump as the candidate they would be most likely to support to be the Republican presidential nominee in 2024. DeSantis was second with 20%, followed by Wyoming Rep. Liz Cheney (7%), Texas Sen. Ted Cruz (6%) and former Vice President Mike Pence (5%). Former U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley and former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo each got three percent (3%), the same as the number of GOP voters saying they’d support “some other candidate” in 2024. Only one percent (1%) of Republican voters support Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul as the 2024 nominee. Among all U.S. Likely Voters, including Democrats and voters not affiliated with either major party, Trump still leads the field of 2024 GOP candidates, with 30%, but Cheney – an outspoken Trump critic – is second with 16%, followed by DeSantis with 14%, while 12% are undecided, “some other candidate” gets 10%, and all other named contenders are in single digits.

    Thirty-one percent (31%) of Likely U.S voters give Biden an excellent or good rating for the way he has handled the Russian aggression toward Ukraine. Forty-nine percent (49%) give him a poor rating for his handling of the Russia-Ukraine situation. Fifty-nine percent (59%) of voters say they have Very Closely followed recent news stories about Russia and Ukraine, while another 28% have followed Russia-Ukraine news Somewhat Closely and 13% have not followed the news closely. Among those who have Very Closely followed the news, 54% rate Biden poor for his handling of Russia’s aggression toward Ukraine. However, most voters are more concerned about protecting America than Ukraine. Fifty-three percent (53%) say defending the U.S. border against illegal immigration is more important to America's national interest than defending Ukraine against Russian invasion. Only 36% believe defending Ukraine is more important to America’s interests, while 10% are not sure.

    Thirty-six percent (36%) of American Adults say they or someone in their household owns a gun. Fifty-two percent (52%) do not have a gun in their home. Of those with a gun in their household, 61% say they feel safer knowing there’s a gun in the house. Just six percent (6%) say they feel less safe because someone in that household owns a gun, while 33% say it has no impact on their personal safety. These findings are nearly unchanged from 2018. More men (42%) than women (32%) say they live in gun-owning households. However, a majority (58%) of men under 40 say they live in homes without firearms.

    And Biden's improvement is back:

    • Strongly Approve: 22% (+2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 47%
    • Total Approve: 44% (+3)
    • Total Disapprove: 55% (-3)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 21% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 47% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 42% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 57% (-1)

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 27%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43%
    • Total Approve: 46%
    • Total Disapprove: 52%

    For Trump, this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 32%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 48%
    • Total Disapprove: 51%

    The past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 32%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 42% (-1)
    • Total Approve: 47% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 52% (-1)

    And since he took office:

    • Strongly Approve: 30%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 44%
    • Total Approve: 45%
    • Total Disapprove: 54%

    And for Obama this week:

    • Strongly Approve: 24% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 41% (+2)
    • Total Approve: 45% (-3)
    • Total Disapprove: 53% (+2)

    Over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 26% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 40%
    • Total Approve: 47%
    • Total Disapprove: 52%

    And since his election:

    • Strongly Approve: 32%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 35%
    • Total Approve: 52%
    • Total Disapprove: 47%
User avatar
By Drlee
#15214842
Why is Rasmussen polling Obama? Because they are just a propaganda machine aimed and right wingers. Obviously. I take all their polls as just partisan push-polling.

Doug knows this that is why his Russian masters make him post this.
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