Malone report from doctors. T-cell damage from vaxx. - Politics Forum.org | PoFo

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#15225007
Igor Antunov wrote:Play stupid mrna games, win stupid prices. Also note the huge spike in children's liver failure. TotaLLy cOiNcidAncE


The hepatitis is being pinned on lockdowns which made sense to me. A lot of the children who became sick apparently weren’t even vaccinated.

I didn’t watch most of the Malone clip as I’m trying really, really fucking hard to stay objective…however as you probably know Igor, we’ve just had some government funded adds on TV urging people to “talk to their doctor about shingles today”.

I’ll just leave that there.
#15225010
Another idiot, that you believe, @JB70, simply because it fits your foolishly dumb narrative.

The Latest Covid Misinformation Star Says He Invented the Vaccines
Dr. Robert Malone says he helped invent mRNA vaccines and has been wronged for decades. Now he’s spreading unfounded claims about the vaccines and the virus.

Dr. Malone also routinely sells himself on the shows as the inventor of mRNA vaccines, the technology used by Pfizer and Moderna for their Covid-19 shots, and says he doesn’t get the credit he deserves for their development. While he was involved in some early research into the technology, his role in its creation was minimal at best, say half a dozen Covid experts and researchers, including three who worked closely with Dr. Malone.

In spreading these exaggerations and unfounded claims, Dr. Malone joins medical professionals and scientists, like Dr. Joseph Mercola and Dr. Judy Mikovits, whose profiles have grown during the pandemic as they spread misinformation about mask-wearing and convoluted conspiracy theories about virus experts like Dr. Anthony Fauci.

The coronavirus pandemic has “given rise to a class of influencers who build conspiracy theories and recruit as many people into them as possible,” said Emerson T. Brooking, a resident senior fellow for the Atlantic Council who studies digital platforms. “These influencers usually have a special claim to expertise and a veneer of credibility.”

The idea that he is the inventor of mRNA vaccines is “a totally false claim,” said Dr. Gyula Acsadi, a pediatrician in Connecticut who along with Dr. Malone and five others wrote a widely cited paper in 1990 showing that injecting RNA into muscle could produce proteins. (The Pfizer and Moderna vaccines work by injecting RNA into arm muscles that produce copies of the “spike protein” found on the outside of the coronavirus. The human immune system identifies that protein, attacks it and then remembers how to defeat it.)

https://www.nytimes.com/2022/04/03/tech ... covid.html


You really are a conspiracy theorist of the worst kind. :knife:
#15225020
Instead of throwing everything in the conspiracy bin Godstud, maybe we can analyze the patents Robert Malone has to his name and also look at his credentials?

Also, your article is behind a paywall.
#15225027
I posted the relevant information. His claims are not new. He's a fraud who tries to claim credit for MRNA vaccines and when he didn't succeed, he tried to discredit reputable science.

JB70 is CONSTANTLY pushing an anti-vax narrative. He's been doing so in 99% of his posts, to date. I will continue to call bullshit on bullshit.

I'll post the entire article.
A vaccine scientist’s discredited claims have bolstered a movement of misinformation
As Robert Malone stood on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial before thousands of anti-vaccine and anti-mandate demonstrators Sunday, the medical doctor and infectious-disease researcher repeated the falsehoods that have garnered him legions of followers.

“Regarding the genetic covid vaccines, the science is settled,” he said in a 15-minute speech that referenced the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and John F. Kennedy. “They are not working.”

The misinformation came two days after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released its first studies based on real-world data showing that coronavirus vaccines provide strong protection against hospitalization from the rapidly spreading omicron variant.

Malone, who said the coronavirus “should never have been politicized,” was met with roaring applause.

“You tell ’em, doc!” one man shouted.

Malone, who bills himself as having played a key role in the creation of mRNA vaccines, has emerged as one of the most controversial voices of the movement against coronavirus vaccines and health mandates. His claims and suggestions have been discredited and denounced by medical professionals as not only wrong, but also dangerous. Twitter barred him for violating the platform’s coronavirus misinformation policy, but he has found platforms elsewhere — recently appearing on an episode of Joe Rogan’s wildly popular podcast, which averages 11 million listeners per episode.

That show — along with guest spots on Fox News programming hosted by Tucker Carlson and Laura Ingraham — has thrust the 62-year-old into the limelight at a crucial time of the pandemic, when unvaccinated patients continue to fill ICU wards.

Critics say Malone’s story highlights the peril of offering an enormous platform to someone who once complained about being “written out of history” and is now finding celebrity.

“There is a huge market for misinformation,” said Jay Van Bavel, an assistant professor of psychology and neural science at New York University who has studied conspiracy theories and misinformation. “The way he’s framed in the conspiracy-theory world is that he’s a courageous whistleblower rather than someone who is spreading misinformation — and it’s only enhancing his profile.”

A former colleague of Malone’s, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to speak candidly without fear of recrimination, said that while Malone is “a brilliant scientist who has a tremendous amount of experience and knowledge about vaccines,” there is reason to be concerned about how his newfound stardom could be a public health risk.

“I don’t feel what he’s doing and saying is in the right context or necessarily very helpful,” the former co-worker said. “Everyone is entitled to their opinion, but there’s a risk we’re all facing when he’s not accurately representing the information.”

Anti-vaccine activists march in D.C. — a city that mandates covid vaccines — to protest mandates

Malone had a following before his “Joe Rogan Experience” interview that was released Dec. 31 — but that show introduced him to an even wider audience. On it, he promoted an unfounded theory called “mass-formation psychosis,” telling Rogan that a “third of the population [is] basically being hypnotized” into believing what the mainstream media and Anthony S. Fauci, the nation’s top infectious-disease expert and chief medical adviser to President Biden, report on the vaccines. Malone went on to compare the country’s pandemic policies to Nazi Germany.

His remarks drew massive attention — and outrage.

“To claim that choosing not to get a vaccine and not being able to go to a movie theater is in any way comparable to Jewish people being targeted and murdered, it blows my mind,” said Jonathan Laxton, an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Manitoba who signed a letter from 270 medical professionals to Spotify this month demanding that the company do more to prevent the spread of false covid-19 information. “He devalued the impact of the Holocaust.”

Van Bavel added: “He used a pseudoscience term and millions of people downloaded the episode — and it took on a life of its own, even though there is no evidence supporting it.”

Doctors call out Spotify for letting Joe Rogan spread ‘false and societally harmful’ covid-19 claims

Malone declined to be interviewed for this story, saying he would “not be able to support” The Washington Post’s request. He did not provide further explanation. Neither Rogan’s publicist nor a Spotify spokesperson immediately replied to requests for comment. A Fox News spokesperson declined to comment.

One person who has stood by Malone: Robert F. Kennedy Jr., a longtime anti-vaccine activist who also spoke at Sunday’s march. In a statement to The Post, Kennedy described media reports on Malone promoting misinformation as a “euphemism for any assertion that departs from government orthodoxies [whether] true or not.”

“In my experience, Malone’s statements are measured and scrupulously sourced,” he said. “I know him well enough to know that he would quickly and publicly correct any statement shown to be untrue.”

Colleagues and critics alike have acknowledged Malone’s impressive credentials in a career spanning more than three decades. Among those accomplishments was serving as CEO and founder of a company contracted by the U.S. government in 2016 to assist in the development of a treatment for the Zika virus. But his former co-worker told The Post that he is also known for his headstrong demeanor, often unwilling to change his stance on a position over the years, even if the science said the opposite.

“Like anything else in life, it can be a huge strength,” the former colleague said, “but that can also create blind spots.”

Malone has long billed himself as the inventor of mRNA vaccines, but the history behind the development is more complicated. When he was a graduate student in biology at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in San Diego in the late 1980s, Malone injected DNA and RNA into mice cells. He co-wrote papers in 1989 and 1990 that said such an injection of fatty droplets into a living organism could bring about new proteins — and possibly “provide alternative approaches to vaccine development” for human cells, researchers wrote.

Nature magazine reported that Malone’s experiments drew on the work of other researchers, and dozens of companies and academic labs would soon formulate the building blocks for mRNA vaccines. Malone’s work offered some of the steppingstones toward decades of innovations from hundreds of researchers that would eventually give way to the mRNA-based coronavirus vaccine administered to millions of people worldwide, according to Nature.

Malone has been public about saying his early work on mRNA vaccines has been overlooked in favor of those who have been declared mRNA pioneers for working on later advancements. Even though two of his papers were the first reference in a 2019 paper about the history of mRNA vaccines, Malone told Nature, “I’ve been written out of history.”

Stressed hospitals are asking workers with covid to return — even if they may be infectious

One of those people who has received recognition for work in mRNA vaccines is biochemist Katalin Karikó, who the New York Times said was among the many who “helped shield the world from the coronavirus.” Karikó shared with the Atlantic an email Malone sent her that accused the biochemist of inflating her accomplishments: “This is not going to end well.” Malone told the magazine in August that the message was not meant as a threat. Karikó declined to comment.

When Malone said he was infected with the coronavirus in February 2020, he said he turned to famotidine, the main ingredient in the over-the-counter heartburn medicine Pepcid, as a treatment. Malone, who at the time was the chief medical officer for the Florida-based pharmaceutical company Alchem Laboratories, took to his LinkedIn page to report how he had figured out the appropriate dose and became “the first to take the drug to treat my own case.”

The Trump administration funded a $21 million study of famotidine in April 2020 that was to be done by Alchem and Northwell Health, a New York health-care provider, despite a lack of data or published studies showing it could be effective against the virus. Malone resigned from Alchem the week the company got the contract, complaining to the Associated Press of a difficult work environment. The study eventually fizzled out amid allegations of conflicts of interest and scientific misconduct. Officials with Alchem and Northwell declined to comment.

Malone said he hoped getting vaccinated would alleviate the long-term symptoms he suffered. But he told the Atlantic that the Moderna injections made his symptoms worse, echoing similar claims from mandate opponents such as musician Eric Clapton. Since then, Malone’s objections surrounding the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines have been mostly about the expedited approval process, as well as the government’s system to track adverse reactions from those who have been vaccinated.

Fact Checker: The false claim that the fully approved Pfizer vaccine lacks liability protection

He published his criticisms of the vaccines and mandates on Twitter, building a following of more than 440,000 users — and a reach that extended far beyond the platform. At an Ohio school board meeting in August, a man who introduced himself as a doctor shared several misleading claims about the vaccines, including that Malone had said no one should ever take the vaccines.

While skeptical of the shots, Malone told the AP in August that he has never stated that coronavirus vaccines should not be administered. His comments have shifted against vaccines more in recent months. Malone argued Sunday that the omicron variant “is destroying the approved narrative that the vaccines are safe and effective,” ignoring last week’s CDC notice that vaccine boosters were preventing serious illness from the omicron variant of the coronavirus, which causes the disease covid-19. He also discouraged people from getting vaccinated and pushed instead for natural immunity, which, as emergency physician Leana S. Wen wrote for The Post in August, is dangerous.

What to know about the omicron variant

It didn’t stop there. A Canadian study suggesting a high rate of heart inflammation after people were given coronavirus vaccines was retracted by the study’s authors in September because of a significant mathematical error, the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. reported. Despite the major inaccuracy, screenshots of the preprint study spread among the anti-vaccine community. Among those who shared it was Malone, who got a huge response to the tweet but did not take it down, even though many noted that the study had been retracted.

Timothy Caulfield, the Canada research chair in health law and policy at the University of Alberta, said Malone injecting himself into a conversation with the kind of credentials he has, and “cherry-picking rotten data,” was “a worst-case scenario.”

“You have this individual who has all these credentials and this history in the biomedical world, so that looks impressive. And he’s referencing a study that, on the face of it, may look impressive. But you don’t know that the study is fraudulent,” Caulfield said, adding that Malone has “weaponized bad research.”

In November, Malone shared a deceptive video to his Twitter followers that falsely linked athlete deaths to coronavirus shots. The video suggested that coronavirus vaccination killed Jake West, a 17-year-old Indiana high school football player who died of sudden cardiac arrest. But the vaccine played no role in West’s death. The teen died of an undiagnosed heart condition in 2013.

Malone tweeted the video with three words about vaccination: “Safe and effective?” He deleted the tweet about the same time he received a cease-and-desist letter from West’s family, according to the AP, and later noted to his followers that he didn’t know the video had been “doctored.”

Twitter permanently suspended him in December; the next day, Rogan published his interview with Malone that pushed the vaccine scientist to stardom.

Rogan’s episode drew immediate backlash, but Malone found support from Rep. Troy E. Nehls (R-Tex.), who entered a full transcript of the interview into the Congressional Record. At Sunday’s march, numerous Malone followers were in the audience, including Rachel Gillert, who carried a sign reading, “Do you have mass-formation psychosis?”

“It seems like a lot of people saw his side of this issue for the first time when he did his interview with Joe Rogan,” said Gillert, 31, of Richmond. “It definitely seems like he’s made a big impact.”

Critics such as Laxton are frustrated with how Malone has been embraced as a credible ally against vaccines and mandates: “He’s put himself exactly where he wants to be. I don’t think you’re going to dissuade too many people from not following him.”

Daniel Kotzin, 52, who flew in from Denver with his two young children to attend Sunday’s march, said Malone’s interview with Rogan, as well as his credentials, have “galvanized” parents who are against vaccinating their children.

“Dr. Malone has risked his reputation and career to stand up for what’s right and true,” he said, adding that he doesn’t believe Malone was promoting misinformation. “Everything he does is done in the best interest for people as a whole.”

After Malone concluded his speech by urging parents to not comply with coronavirus mandates, he received one of the largest ovations of the day, and many yelled, “Thank you!”

With his increased profile in recent weeks, some are calling on him to take a step back and reflect on the damage his misinformation is causing.

“Given the polarization that exists in our world, I don’t think what he’s doing is helping,” said Malone’s former colleague. “That’s what I would ask him right now: ‘Do you think this is helping?’”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/health/2 ... -mandates/

More here, but no paywall:
Experts rate 12 vaccine claims by Robert Malone, the doctor catapulted to fame on Joe Rogan's podcast
https://www.businessinsider.com/experts ... ast-2022-2
#15225028
Godstud wrote:Another idiot, that you believe, @JB70, simply because it fits your foolishly dumb narrative.

The Latest Covid Misinformation Star Says He Invented the Vaccines
Dr. Robert Malone says he helped invent mRNA vaccines and has been wronged for decades. Now he’s spreading unfounded claims about the vaccines and the virus.

Dr. Malone also routinely sells himself on the shows as the inventor of mRNA vaccines, the technology used by Pfizer and Moderna for their Covid-19 shots, and says he doesn’t get the credit he deserves for their development. While he was involved in some early research into the technology, his role in its creation was minimal at best, say half a dozen Covid experts and researchers, including three who worked closely with Dr. Malone.

In spreading these exaggerations and unfounded claims, Dr. Malone joins medical professionals and scientists, like Dr. Joseph Mercola and Dr. Judy Mikovits, whose profiles have grown during the pandemic as they spread misinformation about mask-wearing and convoluted conspiracy theories about virus experts like Dr. Anthony Fauci.

The coronavirus pandemic has “given rise to a class of influencers who build conspiracy theories and recruit as many people into them as possible,” said Emerson T. Brooking, a resident senior fellow for the Atlantic Council who studies digital platforms. “These influencers usually have a special claim to expertise and a veneer of credibility.”

The idea that he is the inventor of mRNA vaccines is “a totally false claim,” said Dr. Gyula Acsadi, a pediatrician in Connecticut who along with Dr. Malone and five others wrote a widely cited paper in 1990 showing that injecting RNA into muscle could produce proteins. (The Pfizer and Moderna vaccines work by injecting RNA into arm muscles that produce copies of the “spike protein” found on the outside of the coronavirus. The human immune system identifies that protein, attacks it and then remembers how to defeat it.)

https://www.nytimes.com/2022/04/03/tech ... covid.html


You really are a conspiracy theorist of the worst kind. :knife:


There are the new studies that seem to confirm the vaxx cause problems with immunity with future infections.

Infection from a new variant after the injection produce only the old variant antibodies. That is what Vanden Bossche mean as well i suppose.

"We find that prior vaccination with Wuhan-Hu-1-like antigens followed by infection with Alpha or Delta variants gives rise to plasma antibody responses with apparent Wuhan-Hu-1-specific imprinting manifesting as relatively decreased responses to the variant virus epitopes, compared with unvaccinated patients infected with those variant viruses. "

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/a ... 7422000769
#15225031
JB70 wrote:There are the new studies that seem to confirm the vaxx cause problems with immunity with future infections.
:lol: You have YET to post anything that supports your stupid conspiracy theory that vaccines are hurting people. You've posted FUCK ALL to support your false statements. Nothing you have stated is fact, nor is it supported by your studies, that you clearly don't understand.

@JB70 You have no clue what that study, you just posted, is about.

Quote the relevant paragraph, then give me a synopsis.. If you can't do that, then you're simply trying to drown me in walls of your BS spam.

Nothing I've read of yours, so far, has supported even the slightest claim that you've said.

Nothing.
#15225035
Godstud wrote::lol: You have YET to post anything that supports your stupid conspiracy theory that vaccines are hurting people. You've posted FUCK ALL to support your false statements. Nothing you have stated is fact, nor is it supported by your studies, that you clearly don't understand.

@JB70 You have no clue what that study, you just posted, is about.

Quote the relevant paragraph, then give me a synopsis.. If you can't do that, then you're simply trying to drown me in walls of your BS spam.

Nothing I've read of yours, so far, has supported even the slightest claim that you've said.

Nothing.


You have to try to understand what the study says yourself.

"We find that prior vaccination with Wuhan-Hu-1-like antigens followed by infection with Alpha or Delta variants gives rise to plasma antibody responses with apparent Wuhan-Hu-1-specific imprinting manifesting as relatively decreased responses to the variant virus epitopes, compared with unvaccinated patients infected with those variant viruses. "
#15225036
https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-02483-w

There’s the Nature article. It’s quite fair, it’s up to the reader to draw their own conclusions.

Malone has the credentials to speak on the topic, but it would seem some people think he is bitter and his intentions are malicious.

Time will tell.

Edit- thanks for posting the whole article Godstud. It’s just an updated version of The Atlantic piece..
#15225053
"We find that prior vaccination with Wuhan-Hu-1-like antigens followed by infection with Alpha or Delta variants gives rise to plasma antibody responses with apparent Wuhan-Hu-1-specific imprinting manifesting as relatively decreased responses to the variant virus epitopes, compared with unvaccinated patients infected with those variant viruses. "
This doesn't mean what you say it does. You're BSing AGAIN.

More anti-vax nonsense.

Malone is a fraud. He's lied numerous times and he peddles lies. My last article clearly shows this.
#15225099
BlutoSays wrote:Robert Malone is an MD with 30+ years in practice.
So what? There are lots of doctors who have more experience who aren't lying assholes. An appeal to authority, when it's already been discredited is simply stupid. Good job on keeping up appearances! :lol:

ness31 wrote:A fraud? Really? Because he was used a Canadian study that got pulled? Did he know it had been retracted? When was the last time he used it publicly?
Read the article I posted. He's not done this ONE time. He's made many false claims.
#15225104
I’ve read the article Godstud, I still don’t think it should be banished to the conspiracy bin.

I personally have watched interviews with people like Robert Malone and Peter McCullough. If they say something publicly that turns out to be wrong, they correct themselves.
We’re going through this whole thing in real time so mistakes are bound to be made, like the value of masks, the origins of the virus, the predicted efficacy of the vaccine.

I don’t know how you’re so sure about it all when clearly it’s all being made up on the fly with changes implemented in light of new information.

Let’s just leave it there. This topic hurts my brain.
#15235323
CLAIM: A study from the Francis Crick Institute in London found that Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine destroys a type of white blood cell called the T cell and weakens the immune system.

AP’S ASSESSMENT: False. The vaccine doesn’t destroy T cells or weaken the immune system. On the contrary, it generates a strong T cell response and boosts immunity, according to experts. A researcher at the Francis Crick Institute told The Associated Press the claim distorts his team’s work, which did not examine T cells.

THE FACTS: Articles that have amassed thousands of views across social media this week misrepresent a June study from Britain’s Francis Crick Institute, which looked at the ability of COVID-19 vaccines to produce neutralizing antibodies against viral variants.

The articles claim that the study shows the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine “destroys T cells” and “weakens the immune system.”

But that’s not at all what the research shows, according to the Francis Crick Institute’s Dr. David Bauer, one of the study’s authors.

“Our work to date has not studied T cells at all,” Bauer told the AP in an email. “All research published to date shows that the Pfizer (and other) vaccines generate a strong, positive, protective T-cell response against SARS-CoV-2.”

Outside experts confirmed that the COVID-19 vaccines don’t destroy or damage T cells.

“There’s a lot of data that shows that the vaccines induce strong T cell responses that recognize the virus and probably lead to protection,” said Dr. Joel Blankson, a professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine who has personally studied T cell responses to COVID-19 vaccines.

“There is no evidence that any SARS-CoV-2 vaccine destroys any pre-existing T cells, rather the truth is the opposite,” said Dr. Grant McFadden, director of the Biodesign Center for Immunotherapy, Vaccines and Virotherapy at Arizona State University. “The vaccines all create new T cells that together with the antibodies all help to protect us from the COVID disease.”

The claim that the vaccines weaken the immune system is also false, Bauer confirmed. Research from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and others shows the vaccines boost the immune response. The mRNA vaccines work by training the immune system to recognize the spike protein on the surface of the virus that causes COVID-19, allowing it to generate an immune response, experts say.

The Francis Crick Institute study examined how antibodies generated by COVID-19 vaccines are able to neutralize new strains of the virus. It found that levels of antibodies generated by the vaccine were six times lower against the delta variant than against the original strain of the coronavirus. However, the vaccine still produced more protective antibodies against the delta variant than exist in unvaccinated people who have not had COVID-19, since unvaccinated people do not have the antibodies.

Therefore, Bauer explained, getting the vaccine offers more protection against the delta variant than going without it. https://apnews.com/article/fact-checking-823830789386
The claim: Cancer increased twentyfold among COVID-19 vaccinated due to suppressed T cells
As health systems across the country begin offering COVID-19 booster shots to those eligible under the CDC's Sept. 24 recommendation, an article circulating on social media claims the life-saving vaccines are creating more disease than they're fighting.

"Idaho doctor reports a '20 times increase' of cancer in vaccinated patients," reads the headline of the Sept. 13 article published by LifeSiteNews, a faith-themed website whose Facebook page was banned by Facebook in May for repeatedly violating the platform's COVID-19 policies concerning misinformation.

The Idaho doctor, Dr. Ryan Cole, says he observed a "20 times increase of endometrial cancers" since Jan. 1 over what he's seen on an annual basis, according to an Aug. 25 video shared to Twitter, which the LifeSiteNews article is based on. He also reported seeing a rash of "invasive melanomas in younger patients... skyrocketing in the last month or two" and an uptick in various autoimmune diseases.Cole asserts the culprits behind this slew of health problems are none other than the COVID-19 vaccines, which he claims are instigating a "drop in your killer T cells," a type of immune cell.

The Sept. 13 article has been shared across Facebook and amassed nearly 10,000 likes, shares and comments within a week, according to CrowdTangle, a social media insights tool.

But it's nonsense.

The claim that the COVID-19 vaccines can cause autoimmune disease has been previously debunked by USA TODAY. Similarly, experts say Cole's claim of COVID-19 vaccines suppressing killer T cells has no basis in reality. And there's no evidence of a cancer surge since the vaccine rollout.

The claim: Cancer increased twentyfold among COVID-19 vaccinated due to suppressed T cells
As health systems across the country begin offering COVID-19 booster shots to those eligible under the CDC's Sept. 24 recommendation, an article circulating on social media claims the life-saving vaccines are creating more disease than they're fighting.

"Idaho doctor reports a '20 times increase' of cancer in vaccinated patients," reads the headline of the Sept. 13 article published by LifeSiteNews, a faith-themed website whose Facebook page was banned by Facebook in May for repeatedly violating the platform's COVID-19 policies concerning misinformation.

The Idaho doctor, Dr. Ryan Cole, says he observed a "20 times increase of endometrial cancers" since Jan. 1 over what he's seen on an annual basis, according to an Aug. 25 video shared to Twitter, which the LifeSiteNews article is based on. He also reported seeing a rash of "invasive melanomas in younger patients... skyrocketing in the last month or two" and an uptick in various autoimmune diseases.


Cole asserts the culprits behind this slew of health problems are none other than the COVID-19 vaccines, which he claims are instigating a "drop in your killer T cells," a type of immune cell.

The Sept. 13 article has been shared across Facebook and amassed nearly 10,000 likes, shares and comments within a week, according to CrowdTangle, a social media insights tool.

But it's nonsense.

The claim that the COVID-19 vaccines can cause autoimmune disease has been previously debunked by USA TODAY. Similarly, experts say Cole's claim of COVID-19 vaccines suppressing killer T cells has no basis in reality. And there's no evidence of a cancer surge since the vaccine rollout.

Cole, owner and operator of his own medical laboratory chain, gained prominence this summer for his vocal opposition to COVID-19 vaccines – calling them "fake" and "needle rape." He also convinced Idaho school officials to scrap a mask mandate.

Cole did not reply to USA TODAY's request for comment. USA TODAY reached out to LifeSiteNews for comment.



T cells coordinate immune defense
Antibodies, immune molecules made in response to a foreign invader, have been well-publicized for their role in vaccine-induced immunity. But these Y-shaped proteins aren't the only ace up our immune system's sleeve.

T cells – the immune cells Cole mentions – are a type of white blood cell with many different functions but of two major types: helper T cells that coordinate an immune attack, and killer T cells that do the killing.

Typically during an immune response to a virus, helper T cells interact with and activate B cells – the white blood cell antibody makers – and killer T cells. Activated killer T cells go off hunting for any infected cells, killing them by triggering a self-destruct sequence programmed into all cells of the human body.



Typically during an immune response to a virus, helper T cells interact with and activate B cells – the white blood cell antibody makers – and killer T cells. Activated killer T cells go off hunting for any infected cells, killing them by triggering a self-destruct sequence programmed into all cells of the human body.



T cell- and B cell-based defense appears a vital element in determining whether a patient survives COVID-19 infection, said Kristen Cohen, a senior staff scientist in the Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Wash.

"(Studies show) you did better in the context of severe disease in terms of survival if you had both arms of the immune system fending off the infection," she told USA TODAY.

However, with COVID-19, Cohen said it was unclear how much killer T cells specifically contribute to the cause.

"We know they're induced and we know they're highly functional... but we don't have clear, sort of causal data ... that they contribute to clearing the infection," she said.


COVID-19 vaccines encourage T cells
Cole's claim about a drop in killer T cells is exactly wrong, said E. John Wherry, director of the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine's Institute for Immunology.

"There are dozens of studies at this point showing that these vaccines induce potent virus-specific T cells and that the rest of the T cell compartment is left essentially normal, essentially untouched," he told USA TODAY. "There's no logical way that (Cole's claim of killer T cells being affected) makes any sense."

In a recent study published in the journal Immunity, Wherry and colleagues found that in healthy people with no prior COVID-19 infection, helper T cells rose after the first dose and killer T cell counts rose after the second dose of either the Moderna or Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine.

Vaccination appeared to boost a T cell immunity already present in previously infected, fully vaccinated people, although only after the first dose and not by that much. In these cases, that the people who got COVID-19 first and then got their vaccination, the vaccination basically acted a little bit like you might predict a boost to do if we give people a (vaccine) boost," Wherry said.

Once the vaccines cajole these T cells into existence, both Cohen and Wherry said they can remain in our bodies for a pretty long time, likely up to six or seven months, much like some studies estimate for antibodies. https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/factcheck/2021/09/27/fact-check-false-claim-cancer-rise-since-vaccine-rollout/8348140002/
#15235331
Hi Deutschmania, nice to see a normal person in one of these threads. They’ve been neglected tbh and there hasn’t really been any meaningful discussion.

Of all the rubbish I have waded through - and it’s been a shit ton - this interview has been the only thing that’s really caught my attention where I feel the need to better grasp what’s being said.



Have a squiz if you are so inclined :)

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