CEOs Start to Push Back Against ‘Woke’ Employee Bullying - Page 2 - Politics Forum.org | PoFo

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#15234527
And, as usual, 'mainstream' politics lags *far behind* actual events -- the politics today isn't 'wokeness' anymore, as much as it's about work-from-home, in the larger context of the pandemic and the Great Resignation.



Remote work

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"Work from home" and "WFH" redirect here. For other uses, see Work from Home (disambiguation) and WFH (disambiguation).
map of 2019 global home-based workers

Remote work, also called work from home (WFH), work from anywhere, telework, remote job, mobile work,[1] and distance work is an employment arrangement in which employees do not commute to a central place of work, such as an office building, warehouse, or retail store.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Remote_work
#15234529
Beren wrote:
It just should be exempt from political activism. I don't mind if colleagues have political opinions or discuss politics, though.



What about when it's the *companies themselves* that are the the social / political problem -- ?


BUSINESS NEWS
JUNE 1, 2018 4:16 PM UPDATED 4 YEARS AGO


Google to scrub U.S. military deal protested by employees - source

https://www.reuters.com/article/uk-alph ... KKCN1IX5YC
#15234542
Beren wrote:
I don't know, it doesn't sound like authentic unionism.



Okay, thanks.



Internal organization

One major characteristic of "business unionism" is the principle that unions should be run like businesses. These unions would be organized as top-down hierarchies, with dedicated employees paid in a stratified way.[6] Business unionism creates a centralized bureaucracy that is independent from and unaccountable to the union rank and file.[7] The "union rep", who earns more than the union workers, is a key element of this structure.[8]

According to this model, the main 'battleground' for organized labour moves from the shop floor to the boardroom, where well-paid business leaders of the union negotiate with well-paid bosses of the company.[9]



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Business_unionism
#15234557
Pants-of-dog wrote:
Part of the problem is that people think a position such as feminism is political, but being sexist (i.e. opposed to feminism) is not political and therefore allowable.



Just as with *racism*, I think we as political people need to frame / contextualize *sexism* as being an *institutional* thing, primarily, as with the lack of legislation that defines abortion as health care.

For racism, it's *redlining*, environmental racism, police brutality / killer cops, and so on.

(See 'movements / institutions', about halfway up in the following diagram.)


History, Macro-Micro -- politics-logistics-lifestyle

Spoiler: show
Image
#15234559
Pants-of-dog wrote:Part of the problem is that people think a position such as feminism is political, but being sexist (i.e. opposed to feminism) is not political and therefore allowable.


At least legally that can get to the offender's firing for creating a hostile work environment.

That doesn't sound allowable to me.
#15234580
Pants-of-dog wrote:Part of the problem is that people think a position such as feminism is political, but being sexist (i.e. opposed to feminism) is not political and therefore allowable.


Perhaps. What is socially acceptable to express openly has shifted in a relatively short time-frame and that has become synonymous with political views. You wouldn't believe the sexist comments I've heard in workplaces and listening to older generations makes me think that it was not better before. By comparison, racist remarks have been far fewer and more tame.

I'll add this to my anecdotes, this was in 'working class' settings and it was very far from only 'the white guys' expressing these views. The most sexist, and quite racist as well, guy I've ever worked with was my former boss, who had a Chilean background actually. :)
#15234583
MadMonk wrote:
Perhaps. What is socially acceptable to express openly has shifted in a relatively short time-frame and that has become synonymous with political views. You wouldn't believe the sexist comments I've heard in workplaces and listening to older generations makes me think that it was not better before. By comparison, racist remarks have been far fewer and more tame.

I'll add this to my anecdotes, this was in 'working class' settings and it was very far from only 'the white guys' expressing these views. The most sexist, and quite racist as well, guy I've ever worked with was my former boss, who had a Chilean background actually. :)



Even *racists* aren't white anymore, huh -- ?


x D
#15235352

In an extraordinary demonstration of Labour’s extreme right-wing character, Labour Leader Keir Starmer ordered his frontbenchers not to attend rail strike picket lines. Five that did so have been told to apologise and are threatened with disciplinary action.

Labour’s hostility to the rail strikes is intimately connected to its support for war against Russia. As the Ukraine war broke out, Starmer demanded that the “British public” must be prepared to “make sacrifices” in the face of “economic pain.” As with his threat to punish his MPs for visiting picket lines, in May he told Labour’s Corbynite rump of 11 MPs that they would be expelled if they did not withdraw support for the Stop the War Coalition and show their “unshakeable support for NATO.” The Corbynite “left” caved immediately.

Build rank-and-file committees and fight for a general strike

The conditions exist for the working class to bring down the Johnson government. In workplaces and on picket lines across the country, talk is of strikes amid an outpouring of sympathy for the rail workers. Given a perspective on which to fight, the working class can unite its struggles in a general strike.

To do so the Socialist Equality Party and the International Workers Alliance of Rank-and-File Committees urge workers to form their own rank-and-file committees in every factory and workplace. This would open a new road for the class struggle, in which trusted representatives of the working class would take the lead and defeat the efforts of the bureaucrats to sabotage every fightback.

In the past weeks, general strikes have been carried out in Greece, Italy and Belgium. Waves of industrial action have rolled through Turkey. On Monday, another national strike was held in Belgium, with the capital Brussels brought to a standstill as 80,000 workers demonstrated. Strikes at Brussels Airlines will be held on Thursday, Friday and Saturday, and at Ryanair on Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Belgian Ryanair workers will be joined by workers in Spain, Italy, Portugal and France throughout the week and EasyJet workers in Spain will walk out next Friday.

A determined industrial and political offensive by the British working class, rallying behind the rail workers, would become a powerful focus and inspiration for the developing class struggles in Europe and internationally. It would halt the warmongers in their tracks.



https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2022/0 ... s-j23.html
#15240197
BlutoSays wrote:
Bravo.

https:// twitter.com/TPostMillennial/status/1550941330007810052



(Translation: The U.S. may need to bring back its postwar-era *internal colonies*, so the culture war has to be ramped-up, to keep social minorities in their place, for exploitation. Also, we're making the weather forecast to be that of recession.)

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