Why the category 'Political Circus'? - Politics Forum.org | PoFo

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#15235371
Well, 'cause it is. But why? That got me thinking.

I came up with a new [for me, at least,] rule of thumb for responses both verbal and physical by h. sapiens. Now, we tend to be a species given to rational thought, at least as far as everyday practicality's concerned. We easily handle the complex series of activities needed to get into our cars, drive through traffic to a store and purchase the groceries for supper. We do this in a logical, rational sequence. We don't, for example, go to a hardware store for a can of tomatoes.

So far, so good, right?

But the further we find ourselves removed from immediate practicality, the more likely we are to stray from fact-based rationality -- from a logical path to a solution. Political palaver about all manner of issues stands as an example. Few of the issues du jour affect us immediately and directly. Discussions abound with 'what if's' and appeals to emotion. Rationality becomes a rara avis midst the name-calling, straw man arguments and non sequiturs.

And so it goes.

Regards, stay safe 'n well.
#15235813
Torus34 wrote:... We easily handle the complex series of activities needed to get into our cars, drive through traffic to a store and purchase the groceries for supper. We do this in a logical, rational sequence.

There is virtually no thinking involved. It's just drone-like behavior.

You get into a car and drive to the store... because all the other drones are doing that.

There's nothing rational about jumping off a cliff with the other lemmings.
#15235850
QatzelOk wrote:There is virtually no thinking involved. It's just drone-like behavior.

You get into a car and drive to the store... because all the other drones are doing that.

There's nothing rational about jumping off a cliff with the other lemmings.


Hi, QatzelOK.

We carry out complex activities that we've done before by rote. This is true. I do not, for example stop and think out each individual step in tying mt shoe laces. These activities, however, were at some point carried out for the first time. That was not by rote.

Regards, stay safe 'n well.
#15235864
Torus34 wrote:These activities, however, were at some point carried out for the first time. That was not by rote.

Yes. Some government research person probably "drove the first car." The researchers then gave the blessing to some well-connected rich person to exploit the technology so that they would become a billionaire.

This process is not something that we study in Social Studies or Civics class. And yet, it is the primary way that Western countries operate: taxes are collected from millions of serfs in order to finance projects that will enrich a handful of oligarchs.

Only in a circus can you find enough performers and special effects to really interpret this kind of social dynamic.
#15235877
QatzelOk wrote:Yes. Some government research person probably "drove the first car." The researchers then gave the blessing to some well-connected rich person to exploit the technology so that they would become a billionaire.

This process is not something that we study in Social Studies or Civics class. And yet, it is the primary way that Western countries operate: taxes are collected from millions of serfs in order to finance projects that will enrich a handful of oligarchs.

Only in a circus can you find enough performers and special effects to really interpret this kind of social dynamic.


Hi again, QatzelOK.

Your response is at best tangential to the thrust of the OP. I'll not respond further to it.

Regards, stay safe 'n well 'n remember the Big 5.
#15236359
Torus34 wrote:...get into our cars, drive through traffic to a store and purchase...


rational thought


the further we find ourselves removed from immediate practicality, the more likely we are to stray from fact-based rationality -- from a logical path to a solution.


While you're out driving around looking for things to purchase, the earth will burn down because of the hyper-consumption involved in your "rational" behavior.

Rational is incomplete. It isn't enough for us to survive and be happy. Thus, circuses of experimental thought are essential because our rational knowledge is only a drop of water in the ocean of reality.

Your (previous) response is at best tangential to the thrust of the OP. I'll not respond further to it.

Don't like tangents? Next time you go driving your car to look for things to purchase, try not using the steering wheel at all to avoid "tangents" and then tell us what happens.
#15236392
Rancid wrote:Politics is a circus. :)

I mean, just look at the nonsense @QatzelOk constantly posts.


Just look at the history of the democrat party.

Image
#15236414
BlutoSays wrote:
Just look at the history of the democrat party.

Image



Life is full of ironies like that.

LBJ pushed hard to get civil rights legislation passed. He wanted to give Blacks what he called "vote power".

He grew up dirt poor in rural Texas, his personality was never much appreciated among the East coast upper crust.

But, if you think anyone else could have, or would have, gotten civil rights legislation passed, you are sadly mistaken.
#15236502
late wrote:Life is full of ironies like that.

LBJ pushed hard to get civil rights legislation passed. He wanted to give Blacks what he called "vote power".

He grew up dirt poor in rural Texas, his personality was never much appreciated among the East coast upper crust.

But, if you think anyone else could have, or would have, gotten civil rights legislation passed, you are sadly mistaken.


Well you democrats sure as F didn't help!

Democrat/GOP Vote Tally on 1964 Civil Rights Act

After reading Shelby Steele's excellent Dec. 18 essay "American Conservatism: Of Race and Imagination" we felt compelled to respond to the popular misconception that "conservatism, for all its commitment to freedom, did not make itself the principled enemy of racism during the civil-rights era." With a little research, the actual voting record for both Houses of Congress shows that the Civil Rights Act of 1964 passed the Senate on a 73-to-27 vote. The Democratic supermajority in the Senate split their vote 46 (69%) for and 21 (31%) against. The Republicans, on the other hand, split their vote 27 for (82%) and 6 against (18%). Thus, the no vote consisted of 78% Democrats. Further, the infamous 74-day filibuster was led by the Southern Democrats, who overwhelmingly voted against the act.

An examination of the House vote shows a similar pattern. The House voted 290 to 130 in favor. Democrats split their vote 152 (61%) to 96 (39%) while Republicans split theirs 138 (80%) to 34 (20%). The no vote consisted of 74% Democrats. Clearly, the 1964 Civil Rights Act could not have been passed without the leadership of Republicans such as Everett Dirksen and the votes of Republicans.

https://www.wsj.com/articles/SB1041302509432817073
#15236522
BlutoSays wrote:


After reading Shelby Steele's excellent Dec. 18 essay "American Conservatism: Of Race and Imagination" we felt compelled to respond to the popular misconception that "conservatism, for all its commitment to freedom, did not make itself the principled enemy of racism during the civil-rights era."




But Republicans are thoroughly racist now..

In addition, it was 46 Dem votes for it, and 27 Republican votes. That was a bipartisan era, a time before Republicans were trying to overthrow the government.

If something was worth doing, they would find ways to get enough votes to pass it.
#15236525
late wrote:But Republicans are thoroughly racist now..

In addition, it was 46 Dem votes for it, and 27 Republican votes. That was a bipartisan era, a time before Republicans were trying to overthrow the government.

If something was worth doing, they would find ways to get enough votes to pass it.



oops

:roll:

#15236530
Understanding The Clintons' Popularity With Black Voters

It's true that Bill Clinton enjoyed heavy support from the black community in the 1990s. But as Hillary Clinton seeks the nomination herself, some are raising questions about just how good the Clinton presidency was for black Americans — not to mention whether Hillary Clinton should get any credit (or, alternatively, blame) for her husband's legacy.

Why Black Voters Loved Bill

In fact, history has misunderstood that "first black president" idea, as Ta-Nehisi Coates wrote last year. Author Toni Morrison later said she was trying to talk not about Clinton's popularity with black voters but his treatment in the public arena, especially following the Monica Lewisnky scandal ("I said he was being treated like a black on the street, already guilty, already a perp").

What drove that popularity? In part, it was regionalism. Clinton did particularly well among Southern African-Americans, and the fact that he was from Arkansas probably helped him.

"Because of his Southern heritage, he appeared to be very, very comfortable in African-American communities," says Andra Gillespie, an associate professor of political science at Emory University. That ease, Gillespie said, ranges from his famous sax-playing appearance on The Arsenio Hall Show to his ease on the campaign trail in interacting with black voters — it "sort of hinted at a certain type of cultural fluency that was welcome to African-American voters," she added.

His Southern heritage probably helped him with white voters, too, though — hence the nickname "Bubba."

And once he was in office, he tried to show he was reaching across color lines.

"I think that a mixture of his personality and his politics really made him relatable and likable to many in the black community," said Stefanie Brown James

The Clinton years were also known for a booming economy. During that time, the median household income in African-American households grew by 25 percent, twice as fast as it did for all households nationwide. In addition, African-American unemployment plummeted from 14.1 percent to 8.2 percent (of course, the unemployment rate also fell for other groups). And the administration touted its record of boosting loans to minorities.

While it's true that African-Americans vote overwhelmingly Democratic, identity is just one small part of the many factors playing into the choice between Clinton and Sanders.
https://www.npr.org/2016/03/01/46818569 ... ack-voters

Vote gas station. Anyone hear about gas station?

, "I think people forget that we've lived in the White House for six years. ... Before that, Barack Obama was a black man that lived on the South Side of Chicago, who had his share of troubles catching cabs."
#15236592
late wrote:He grew up dirt poor in rural Texas, his personality was never much appreciated among the East coast upper crust.

He sounds like an Andrew Jackson, but with automobile technology added.

Perhaps the propaganda of car commercials made LBJ realize that he only needed to propagandized African-American voters into giving the Democrat Party their faith.

Used car salesman technology became America's political ideology after WW2, and instead of more democracy, Americans got more media intrusion into their alienated lives.
#15236597
QatzelOk wrote:He sounds like an Andrew Jackson, but with automobile technology added.

Perhaps the propaganda of car commercials made LBJ realize that he only needed to propagandized African-American voters into giving the Democrat Party their faith.

Used car salesman technology became America's political ideology after WW2, and instead of more democracy, Americans got more media intrusion into their alienated lives.


Andrew Jackson born to Scots-Irish immigrants, March 15, 1767. The family from which General Jackson came was founded in Western Virginia by John Jackson, an emigrant from Lon- don. His stock was Scotch-Irish . and it is most probable that John Jackson himself was removed by his parents from the north of Ireland to London^ in his second year. Nearly fifty years after he left England, his son, Colonel George Jackson, while a member of the Congress of the United States, formed a friendship with the celebrated Andrew Jackson of Tennessee. and the two traced their ancestry up to the same parish near London- derry, Although no more intimate relationship could be estab- lished between the families, siicli a tie is rendered probable by their marked resemblance in energy and courage, as illustrated not only in the career of the two great commanders who have made the name immortal, but of other members of their houses..
-life of Stonewall Jackson chapter 1 intro...
Thomas Woodrow Wilson was born to a family of Scots-Irish and Scottish descent in Staunton, Virginia. He was the third of four children and the first son of Joseph Ruggles Wilson and Jessie Janet Woodrow.

Image
My country, 'tis of thee
Sweet land of liberty
For this I sing
Land where my fathers died
Land of the pilgrims' pride
From every mountainside
Let freedom ring!
My native country, thee
Land of the noble free
Thy name I love
I love thy rocks and rills
Thy woods and templed hills
My heart with rapture thrills
Like that above
Let music swell the breeze
And ring from all the trees
Sweet freedom's song
Let mortal tongues awake
Let all that breathe partake
Let rocks their silence break
The sound prolong
Our fathers' God, to Thee
Author of liberty
To Thee we sing
Long may our land be bright
With freedom's holy light
Protect us by Thy might
Great God, our King
#15236601
QatzelOk wrote:
He sounds like an Andrew Jackson



Andrew Jackson was brutally racist, LBJ wanted to make it possible for the lives of Blacks to be better. In that sense, they are opposites.
#15236651
late wrote:Andrew Jackson was brutally racist, LBJ wanted to make it possible for the lives of Blacks to be better. In that sense, they are opposites.

So the entire Church was hostile in the Crusades and the slave trade and they pick at themselves and their end only for fun.
#15236708
Mike12 wrote:
So the entire Church was hostile in the Crusades and the slave trade and they pick at themselves and their end only for fun.



On the unlikely assumption you have a point, it escapes me.
#15236730
late wrote:On the unlikely assumption you have a point, it escapes me.

What, really? A man of his times with popularity years before and afterward and during his presidency.

Anyway. Whats it look like he did though, 'free entire sections of alabama and mississippi' and remove the indians from the power of the states. seek correction from the 'lights that reformed our governance'. Have a lot of discipline in mind for an asset inventory of 100 slaves. I mean I wouldn't want to see Brazil, Jamaica, Britain or Germany in 1829. I mean they, the government ,throw up prayers about it in a non-effectual non-scoail gesture that is weird for Presbyterians and the Reformation, in the '58 United PCUSA and the '84 PCUSA. So now black people flocked to the freedom cause in '58 or '84, is that a government program or what is it?

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