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By MistyTiger
#15206899
The Eye of the World by Robert Jordan

Reminds me of LOTR. I am not sure if I will read all the books in the series. One reviewer said that later books were not that good and Rand becomes a minor character.
By ness31
#15228252
Dante’s The Divine Comedy. I would have preferred to be a little high reading this, but I have no idea how to procure green, so stone cold, boringly sober it is.
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By Godstud
#15228262
Now reading the Witcher series of books. On the The Tower of Swallows. Pretty entertaining.

Also listening to Cibola Burn by James SA Corey.

I have Meditations, by Marcus Aurelius, as my next book.
By ness31
#15228264
You read a lot Godstud, an admirable trait. I think I need to bar myself from my screens lol.
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By Godstud
#15228276
I make the time. I visit coffee shops and read there, while having a nice drink or two, and do some "bird" watching. :D

Years ago I figured that if I was going to hit a gym and improve my body, that I needed to improve my mind, as well. Reading keeps you sharp, and is good entertainment. It's also handy that some bookstores, online, have free international delivery.
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By Drlee
#15228279
Meditations is a great book. I read it as a young man and it had an impact on me.

Spoiler alert:

“The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane.”
― Marcus Aurelius, Meditations
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By Godstud
#15241234
I just finished a Patrick O'Brian book, HMS Surprise, and am now embarking on a more serious book.

I started this book, today. I have heard good things about it.
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By ness31
#15241243
Wow, you’re reading JP.

I don’t know how to say this, because theoretically I should love everything about Jordan Peterson. But there’s something going on there that stops me from warming up to him properly…no idea what it is and I so desperately want to embrace him as a voice.

lol, it might just be his voice. Tim Dillon does a great impression of him :lol:
By late
#15241250
I started picking up Rise and Fall of American Growth again. It is heavy literally and figuratively.

Anyway, as I've learned about the world's demographics woes, it made me want to take a closer look at that book. He arrives at his pessimism from a different vantage point, but there is likely to be some synergy (assuming he's right).

I jumped forward a couple hundred pages to the point where he gets into the meat of his thesis. At least I hope he will eventually.

You should be able to get a copy through your library, but a month won't even get you to Ch. 2... But it will be enough to tell you if you want to buy a copy. I got a used copy through Amazon. It's a superb book, even if his pessimism is misplaced to some degree. (I have a couple bones to pick with what he's saying. For example, he's using economic growth as his base metric, but to take computers as an example, it has a lot of benefits that don't translate quickly into traditional ways of looking at progress. For example, science works a lot faster now. The dramatic improvements in computing power have enabled a lot of science and engineering that just wasn't possible earlier, like climate research)



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By Godstud
#15241261
ness31 wrote:I don’t know how to say this, because theoretically I should love everything about Jordan Peterson. But there’s something going on there that stops me from warming up to him properly…no idea what it is and I so desperately want to embrace him as a voice.
I have been very critical of him in the past, but recently I saw some videos of him and warmed to him. He was very unfairly demonized by "liberal media". His book gets great reviews, as well. In his element, psychology, he is brilliant and very engaging.
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By Mike12
#15241269
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The Underwoods are dumb white people that can't turn away from trying to care about Korea, there's antics of a line of 5 of them. I don't know what everyone's doing with that.
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In the Providence of God it was my privilege to be among the very first missionaries to go to the Hermit Nation, and He has permitted me during the past twenty-three years -to be present and to watch with keen interest the progress of His kingdom and the developments of the work, and to have some little share in it. We have seen His Church grow from nothing to a body of believers over one hundred thousand strong.
From the very start Koreans have shown a receptivity unequalled by the people of any other land, , and as a result the success that has followed the . preaching of the Gospel has been phenomenal. Thousands have been won to the Cross, and the only limit seems to have been the physical power of the missionary to cope with, guide, and direct the work.
Very early in the history of the work, almost at its beginning, God, in His Providence, led us to adopt methods that have been said by some to have been unique, but in reality are simply those that have been adopted by numbers of missionaries in different parts of the world. The only unique feature has been the almost unanimity with which these have been followed by the whole missionary body in this land.
A knowledge of this country, of the people, with their characteristics, of the methods employed by the Missions in Korea, together with a review of the results that have followed will, we believe, enable the Christian Church to hear the "Call of Korea," lead the people of America to realize that this is God's call at the present time and to send the reenforcements now. Horace G. Underwood.
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By ThirdTerm
#15241301
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In August 1765 the East India Company defeated and captured the young Mughal emperor and forced him to set up in his richest provinces a new government run by English traders who collected taxes through means of a vast and ruthless private army.0The creation of this new government marked the moment that the East India Company ceased to be a conventional international trading corporation, dealing in silks and spices, and became something much more unusual: an aggressive colonial power in the guise of a multinational business. In less than half a century it had trained up a private security force of around 260,000 men - twice the size of the British army - and had subdued an entire subcontinent, conquering first Bengal and finally, in 1803, the Mughal capital of Delhi itself. The Company's reach stretched relentlessly until almost all of India south of the Himalayas was effectively ruled from a boardroom in London. 'The Anarchy' tells the remarkable story of how one of the world's most magnificent empires disintegrated and came to be replaced by a dangerously unregulated private company, based thousands of miles overseas and answerable only to its shareholders. In his most ambitious and riveting book to date, William Dalrymple tells the story of the East India Company as it has never been told before, unfolding a timely cautionary tale of the first global corporate power.
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By Mike12
#15241359
ThirdTerm wrote:Image

In August 1765 the East India Company defeated and captured the young Mughal emperor and forced him to set up in his richest provinces a new government run by English traders who collected taxes through means of a vast and ruthless private army.0The creation of this new government marked the moment that the East India Company ceased to be a conventional international trading corporation, dealing in silks and spices, and became something much more unusual: an aggressive colonial power in the guise of a multinational business. In less than half a century it had trained up a private security force of around 260,000 men - twice the size of the British army - and had subdued an entire subcontinent, conquering first Bengal and finally, in 1803, the Mughal capital of Delhi itself. The Company's reach stretched relentlessly until almost all of India south of the Himalayas was effectively ruled from a boardroom in London. 'The Anarchy' tells the remarkable story of how one of the world's most magnificent empires disintegrated and came to be replaced by a dangerously unregulated private company, based thousands of miles overseas and answerable only to its shareholders. In his most ambitious and riveting book to date, William Dalrymple tells the story of the East India Company as it has never been told before, unfolding a timely cautionary tale of the first global corporate power.

China's Ming and India's Mughal are Mongol leftovers that seem to self-collapse. I hope they get there. Where's an Indian Muslim today in Pakistan. There's never been more than 200,000 military that are British in a continent of 1.1 billion, 260,000 is a cumulative number. Yes just put a coin in their hands and they become birdchasers on your giant estate, where you hire 100 birdchasers off your lawn, run run and scare the birds.
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By Potemkin
#15241362
Mike12 wrote:China's Ming and India's Mughal are Mongol leftovers that seem to self-collapse.

I presume you mean the Yuan Dynasty, @Mike12. The Mongols overthrew the Song Dynasty, then the Ming overthrew the Yuan Dynasty. Then the Manchus overthrew the Ming, and that was the last imperial dynasty.

I hope they get there. Where's an Indian Muslim today in Pakistan. There's never been more than 200,000 military that are British in a continent of 1.1 billion, 260,000 is a cumulative number. Yes just put a coin in their hands and they become birdchasers on your giant estate, where you hire 100 birdchasers off your lawn, run run and scare the birds.

More babbling…. :roll:
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By Mike12
#15241363
Potemkin wrote:I presume you mean the Yuan Dynasty, @Mike12. The Mongols overthrew the Song Dynasty, then the Ming overthrew the Yuan Dynasty. Then the Manchus overthrew the Ming, and that was the last imperial dynasty.


More babbling…. :roll:

The Yuan dynasty was a successor state to the Mongol Empire after its division and a conquest dynasty of imperial China[note 2] established by Kublai (Emperor Shizu), leader of the Mongol Borjigin clan, lasting from 1271 to 1368.The Ming dynasty (/mɪŋ/),[7] officially the Great Ming, was an imperial dynasty of China, ruling from 1368 to 1644 following the collapse of the Mongol-led Yuan dynasty. The Ming dynasty was the last orthodox dynasty of China ruled by the Han Chinese, the major ethnicity of China.

OK caught me. babble babble . The Mughal Empire was founded by Babur (reigned 1526–1530), a Central Asian ruler who was descended from the Turco-Mongol conqueror Timur (the founder of the Timurid Empire) on his father's side, and from Genghis Khan on his mother's side.[43] Ousted from his ancestral domains in Central Asia, Babur turned to India to satisfy his ambitions. The Mughal Empire was an early-modern empire that controlled much of South Asia between the 16th and 19th centuries.

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By Godstud
#15249545
Just finished "The Evening and the Morning" by Ken Follett. It's a prequel to "The Pillars of the Earth". I'm going to find that book, next. I like his writing style.
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By Local Localist
#15249548
Oedipus Rex! Well, I just finished it. I think it was easy to get through because I already knew what was going to happen, but I believe the play was written with the expectation that the audience already knew the story anyway. I'm onto Oedipus at Colonus now, but I might switch to something else first...
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