Key Rasmussen Polls - Page 62 - Politics Forum.org | PoFo

Wandering the information superhighway, he came upon the last refuge of civilization, PoFo, the only forum on the internet ...

Political issues and parties in the USA and Canada.

Moderator: PoFo North America Mods

Forum rules: No one line posts please.
By Hindsite
#15090784
Drlee wrote:What a stupid comment. I am not going to hijack this thread arguing with another Trump drone. They are all hopelessly besotted anyway. I am through arguing with their fabricated excuses and outright lies from the administration. Indeed if you can call that disorganized collection of narcissists and sycophants an administration.

Oh. And Trump did get rid of the Pandemic team and refused to read their briefing papers prepared for when he took over.

It looks like to me that you are just making stuff up based on your hatred of President Trump without any real evidence.
I think it is termed Trump Derangement Syndrome.
By Doug64
#15090876
Drlee wrote:Oh. And Trump did get rid of the Pandemic team and refused to read their briefing papers prepared for when he took over.

If you’d rather rant than respond, that’s up to you. But for this, since for some reason my last link setup didn’t work: No, the White House Didn’t ‘Dissolve’ Its Pandemic Response Office
User avatar
By Drlee
#15090906
Nice Try. Snopes says:


The claim came from a series of tweets posted by Judd Legum, who runs Popular Information, a newsletter he describes as being about “politics and power.” Legum’s commentary was representative of sharp criticism from Democratic legislators (and some Republicans) that the Trump administration had ill-prepared the country for a pandemic even as one was looming on the horizon.

Legum outlined a series of cost-cutting decisions made by the Trump administration in preceding years that had gutted the nation’s infectious disease defense infrastructure. The “pandemic response team” firing claim referred to news accounts from Spring 2018 reporting that White House officials tasked with directing a national response to a pandemic had been ousted.

Rear Adm. Timothy Ziemer abruptly departed from his post leading the global health security team on the National Security Council in May 2018 amid a reorganization of the council by then-National Security Advisor John Bolton, and Ziemer’s team was disbanded. Tom Bossert, whom the Washington Post reported “had called for a comprehensive biodefense strategy against pandemics and biological attacks,” had been fired one month prior.

It’s thus true that the Trump administration axed the executive branch team responsible for coordinating a response to a pandemic and did not replace it, eliminating Ziemer’s position and reassigning others, although Bolton was the executive at the top of the National Security Council chain of command at the time.

Legum stated in a follow-up tweet that “Trump also cut funding for the CDC, forcing the CDC to cancel its efforts to help countries prevent infectious-disease threats from becoming epidemics in 39 of 49 countries in 2018. Among the countries abandoned? China.” That was partly true, according to 2018 news reports stating that funding for the CDC’s global disease outbreak prevention efforts had been reduced by 80%, including funding for the agency’s efforts in China.

But that was the result of the anticipated depletion of previously allotted funding, not a direct cut by the Trump administration. And as the CDC told FactCheck.org, the cuts were ultimately avoided because Congress provided other funding.

On Feb. 24, 2020, the Trump administration requested $2.5 billion to address the coronavirus outbreak, an outlay critics asserted might not have been necessary if the previous program cuts had not taken place. Fortune reported of the issue that:
By Doug64
#15092111
Hoping everyone is doing well. Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-five percent (35%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending May 7, 2020.

    The Rasmussen Reports Immigration Index for the week of May 3-7, 2020 has risen to 104.2 from 101.6 the week before.

    64% of Likely U.S. Voters are concerned that the government’s cure for the coronavirus threat may be worse than the problem, with 34% who are Very Concerned. This compares to 59% and 32% respectively in late March. Thirty-one percent (31%) don’t share that concern, but that includes only 11% who are Not At All Concerned. Still, 59% rate the coronavirus response by state and local authorities in the area where they live as good or excellent so far. Just 15% give those authorities poor marks. Even among those who are Very Concerned that the government cure may be worse that the problem, 52% rate the state and local response in their area positively.

    54% of Likely Democratic Voters are satisfied with Biden as the Democrats’ 2020 nominee. Twenty-eight percent (28%) think the party should find someone else to be their nominee, while another 18% are undecided. Ninety-two percent (92%) of Democrats, however, think it’s likely Biden will be the Democratic presidential nominee in 2020, with 77% who say it’s Very Likely. Because of the numerous primaries delayed or modified due to the coronavirus, most Democrats said in early April that an open convention in which delegates are not bound by primary outcomes is likely. But 90% still thought Biden was the likely nominee, with 70% who said it was Very Likely. Among all likely voters, 36% think Democrats need to find someone other than Biden to be their nominee; 45% disagree, and 19% are undecided. But 82% think Biden is the likely nominee, with 63% who say it’s Very Likely.

    22% of Likely U.S. Voters believe that the United States can buy its way out of the economic damage done by the coronavirus crisis with government money. Fifty-six percent (56%) disagree. This compares to 25% and 45% in early April when we first asked this question. Twenty-one percent (21%) remain not sure. Senate Democrats have proposed that the federal government pay $2,000 a month to those who earn less than $120,000 annually until the coronavirus emergency is over, with an additional $2,000 per child for up to three children. The payments would be retroactive to March. Forty-nine percent (49%) of voters favor such a plan. Thirty-eight percent (38%) are opposed, while 13% are undecided. Sixty-four percent (64%) of Democrats support the retroactive $2,000 monthly payments, compared to 39% of Republicans and 43% of voters not affiliated with either major political party. But then while 61% of GOP voters and 62% of unaffiliateds say America cannot buy itself out of the coronavirus economic crisis with government money, just 48% of Democrats agree.

    23% of Likely Republican Voters think their party should find someone other than Trump to be their presidential nominee. Seventy percent (70%) disagree. Only seven percent (7%) are undecided. 95% see Trump as their likely nominee, with 85% who say it’s Very Likely. Among all likely voters, 87% say Trump is likely to be the GOP nominee, with 74% who say it’s Very Likely. Voters are evenly divided – 45% yes, 45% no – when asked if Republicans should find someone else to nominate, with 11% who are undecided.

    60% of Likely U.S. Voters continue to share a favorable view of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, with 24% who view it Very Favorably. This is little changed from surveys over the past several years. Thirty-four percent (34%) view the agency unfavorably, but that includes just 14% with a Very Unfavorable opinion. Thirteen percent (13%) regard current FBI Director Christopher Wray as better than most of those who held the job before him. Seventeen percent (17%) say he’s worse than most of his predecessors, while 38% rate his performance as about the same. But nearly as many (33%) don’t know enough about the man named to the post by President Trump in 2017 to venture any kind of opinion on him.

    As parts of the country slowly emerge from coronavirus lockdown, economic confidence has slowed from April’s rapid descent, dropping just one point to 93.7 in May. But this is the lowest finding in six years of surveying and six points below the April 2014 baseline. Twenty-three percent (23%) of American Adults still rate the economy as good or excellent this month, down another six points from April. Forty-four percent (44%) say the economy is poor, the highest level of pessimism since the survey began. Just 13% think the economy is getting better, down one point from last month and the lowest level of confidence in economic direction in six years of surveying. Sixty-two percent (62%) expect a worsening economy, down five points from last month. Fifteen percent (15%) see things staying about the same. By comparison, just prior to the 2016 presidential election, 31% rated the economy as good or excellent, and 26% expected it to get better.

    And here's the President's job approval over the last week. Rasmussen's -1 for Friday is third highest of the RCP collection of polls, with The Hill/HarrisX (+2, 538 C+) and Gallup (+1, 538 ranking B) currently higher. Drop the highest and lowest polls, and the average is -3.4:

    • Strongly Approve: 34% (-1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 42% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 48%
    • Total Disapprove: 51% (+1)

    And over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 33% (+1)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43%
    • Total Approve: 46%
    • Total Disapprove: 52% (-1)
By Doug64
#15093912
Hoping everyone is still doing well. Here's this weekend's round-up of polls. Anyone that wants to check out any possible links over the next week can go to the link to the left. (Anyone wanting more details on a particular poll, just ask):

    Thirty-five percent (35%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending May 14, 2020.

    The Rasmussen Reports Immigration Index for the week of May 10-14, 2020 tumbled to 99.0, down over five points from 104.2 the week before. Are Americans growing more protective of the domestic job market?

    49% of Likely U.S. Voters believe Flynn was correctly convicted of the charges against him. Thirty-four percent (34%) disagree and say the former national security adviser to President Trump was a victim of illegal FBI entrapment. Seventeen percent (17%) are undecided. But 39% agree with the Justice Department’s decision to drop the charges against Flynn because of the FBI’s actions. Just as many (40%) disagree, while 20% are not sure.

    65% of American Adults rate Fauci’s performance as good or excellent. Just 11% say he’s done a poor job. Fauci at a Senate hearing last week cautioned against too-rapid reopening of the country, prompting rare public disagreement from President Trump. But 49% of Americans agree with Trump’s statement in response to Fauci’s testimony: “We have to get the schools open. We have to get our country open. We have to open our country. Now we want to do it safely, but we also want to do it as quickly as possible. We can’t keep going on like this.” Thirty-six percent (36%) disagree with the president. Fifteen percent (15%) are undecided.

    Similarly, 68% share a favorable opinion of the immunologist who is perhaps the most visible member of the Trump Administration’s White House Coronavirus Task Force, with 42% who view him Very Favorably. Only 20% regard Fauci unfavorably, and that includes just eight percent (8%) with a Very Unfavorable view. Fauci at a Senate hearing last week cautioned against too-rapid reopening of the country, prompting rare public disagreement from President Trump. But 49% of Americans agree with Trump’s statement in response to Fauci’s testimony: “We have to get the schools open. We have to get our country open. We have to open our country. Now we want to do it safely, but we also want to do it as quickly as possible. We can’t keep going on like this.” Thirty-six percent (36%) disagree with the president. Fifteen percent (15%) are undecided.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds Biden earning 48% support among Likely U.S. Voters to Trump’s 43%. Eight percent (8%) remain undecided. This marks little change from Biden’s 48% to 42% advantage in early March. Trump beat Biden 47% to 43% in a hypothetical matchup last September. When asked which candidate would do a better job bringing the country back economically from the coronavirus crisis, 47% of voters say Biden, 44% Trump. Nine percent (9%) are not sure.

    54% of Likely U.S. Voters believe Trump should release his tax returns to congressional Democrats, up from 51% a year ago. Thirty-eight percent (38%) disagree.

    32% of American Adults now say they or someone in their immediate family has lost their job because of the coronavirus outbreak. This is down from 40% in mid-April and back to the 32% reported a month earlier. Little changed from last month is the 87% who remain concerned about the financial impact of the coronavirus, with 60% who are Very Concerned. This compares to 91% and 67% in March.

    58% of Likely U.S. Voters approve of Trump’s decision to temporarily limit government regulation of small businesses to help them bounce back. Just 26% are opposed, while 17% are undecided. The president’s action has triggered criticism from some. While 70% of Republicans and 59% of voters not affiliated with either major party agree with the decision to temporarily limit government regulation of small businesses, just 44% of Democrats share that view. Seventy-six percent (76%) of all voters agree, though, that small businesses are hurt by government regulations more than big businesses are. Only nine percent (9%) think big businesses are hurt more. Fifteen percent (15%) are not sure.

    26% of American Adults have been forced to cancel tickets to a live sporting event because of the lockdown. Slightly more (28%) say they are more likely to watch sporting events on TV now that they are closed to the public. Nineteen percent (19%) are less likely to watch sports on TV, while 49% say their viewing habits are about the same. Forty-six percent (46%) of Americans say they rarely or never attend a live sporting event. Nineteen percent (19%) go at least a couple times a month. Among those who attend live sporting events at least a couple times monthly, nearly 60% have been forced to cancel tickets because of the coronavirus lockdown.

    And here's the President's job approval over the last week. Rasmussen's -7 for the week is only one point below the RCP's current average of -8:

    • Strongly Approve: 32% (-2)
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43% (+1)
    • Total Approve: 46% (-2)
    • Total Disapprove: 53% (+2)

    And over the past month:

    • Strongly Approve: 33%
    • Strongly Disapprove: 43%
    • Total Approve: 47% (+1)
    • Total Disapprove: 52%

    The RCP's latest average betting odds is Trump +8.5.
  • 1
  • 58
  • 59
  • 60
  • 61
  • 62

Police shoot at the media for filming them: http[…]

https://youtu.be/Z2wkFyIqg4E

I believe I dispensed with most of the arguments […]

I don't think Americans are as spineless as you […]